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Full text of "Southern Illinois University Information Service news release."

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://archive.org/details/southernillinois1962sout 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11-1-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. « Southern Illinois University research professor 
Richard 17. Poston's new book, "Democracy Speaks Many Tongues,'* (Harper & Row) 
is given a full-page review in the "Books in the News" section of the November 3 
issue of Saturday Review, it was announced today. 

The review, by noted author Stringfellow Barr, calls the book a "first-hand 
report on what 'community development 1 is accomplishing in the villages of Asia, 
Africa and Latin America, and a plea that Washington's official efforts in foreign 
economic aid make more effective use of community development." 

Barr states in the review that he has "read few books that can more quickly 
and movingly help the American reader discover why the bulk of mankind rejects 
our cold-war assumption that the quarrel between Washington and Moscow is this 
century's highest priority. 

"Or why most men and women consider that quarrel merely the obstacle to 
solving man's chief problem, the life-and-death need of most nations for economic 
growth," Barr adds. "Anybody who has gone into the villages of Asia for himself 
will recognise Mr. Poston as a superb guide, equipped with a warm heart and a 
cool head." 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11-1-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — B.D. (Bill) Hudgens, vice president and branch 
manager of the Mercantile Mortgage Co. in Carbondale for the past nine years, has 
been named assistant director of Auxiliary Enterprises for Southern Illinois 
University. 

Hudgens, a graduate of Southern in 1940, is presently treasurer of the SIJ 
Alumni organization and has served on the Alumni board since 1957. He received his 
LLB from Washington University in St. Louis and is a member of the Missouri Bar 
Association. He is a member of the Carbondale Planning Commission and commanding 
officer of Naval Reserve Composite Unit Co. 9-109 *7hich meets on the SIU campus. 

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CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Susan Caldwell, Carbondale piano student at 
Southern Illinois University, x*ill perform her senior recital Thursday (Nov. 8) at 
8:15 p.m. in Shryock Auditorium. The recital is required of all candidates for the 
bachelor of music degree in the School of Fine Arts. 

Miss Caldwell will play the "French Suite V," by Bach; Mozart's "Concerto 
in A Major," and Schumann's "Carnaval, Opus 9." 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11-1-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — Southern Illinois University's special program for 
disabled students has created a demand for an unusual type of student employment- 
attendants for wheel chair students, 

Thomas North, coordinator of disabled student affairs, reports 37 wheel chair 
students this year - about the same number that attended SIU last year - but the 
seriousness of their disabilities is greater. Last year only two wheel chair 
students required regular attendants. This year at least six of the 37 need regular 
assistance. The remainder require help at special times. 

The Illinois Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, working with the University's 
Rehabilitation Institute, keeps a list of students willing to work as attendants. 

Had there been a better supply North said, the wheel chair figure this year 
"would be 50 instead of 37—1 can think off-hand of six who couldn't come to SIU 
because there weren't attendants available," 

Being an attendant is a confining job, North said, "Some in wheel chairs need 
assistance only in getting to the right place at the right time— a big responsibility 
in itself— but others require help with dressing and other personal chores," 

Employing an attendant usually is a business arrangement between the disabled 
student and his helper. Rate of pay is about a dollar an hour— slightly higher 
than the average campus student work rate— or is figured on a weekly basis, North 
said. Some disabled students receive a $25 weekly allowance for attendant hire. 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 1 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Southern Illinois University graduate 
Glendon R. Miller of East St. Louis (830 N. 25th), has won the University of 
Missouri's Mallinckrodt Microbiology Research Fellowship for studies in 
microbiology. 

Miller received bachelor's and master's degrees in microbiology at SIU and 
was a research assistant working in cancer -related research programs with Dan McClary, 
assistant professor. He went to Missouri this fall to begin doctoral degree 
studies. 

The Mallinckrodt Fellowship provides $11,400 for the student's research work 
and personal support. Miller was chosen by the University of Missouri department 
of microbiology and School of Medicine. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone : 453-2276 



J ^\y n-i-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — This is the time of the year when southern 
Illinoisans should he especially alert to the fact that fire continues to be one 
of the frequent takers of life in our nation, according to James E. Aaron, 
coordinator of the Safety Center at Southern Illinois University. 

Did you realize, for example, that: 3*400 children died in fires last year - 
38 per cent of all fire victims are children; 115,200 persons have perished in 
fires during the last 10 years; %\\ billion was the economic loss attributed to 
fires last year; 50 per cent of all fires affect jobs; and 43 per cent of business 
firms hit by severe fires never resume operation. 

The very fact that some 800 homes are consumed by fire each day in the United 
States should stimulate us to put our houses in order to eliminate the possibility 
of such a disaster, Aaron said. Learn and obey these rules: 

* Be careful with matches and smoking materials. 

* Eliminate electrical hazards. 

* Clean out old rags, papers, mattresses, broken furniture and other 
combustibles. 

* Check heating and cooking equipment. 

* Keep basement, garage and yard clean. 

* Develop a family exit plan and practice it. Know how to evacuate your 
home from any room. 

For a free copy of a Home Fire Safety Check List, write to Coordinator, 
Safety Center, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 1 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLIIIOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



SIU COUNTRY COLUMN 
By Albert Meyer 

Several thousand American communities will be focusing attention on ways 
to create better understanding of mutual problems between farmers and their city 
cousins during the eighth national Farm-City Week observance, Nov. 16-22, says 
Walter J. Wills, chairman of the Southern Illinois University agricultural industries 
department. 

In proclaiming this special week, President John F. Kennedy calls for all to 
join in the observance "as evidence of America's appreciation to all those in the 
cities and on the farms who provide us with food and fiber for better living." 

This year the national Farm-City Committee has agreed on a six-point action 
program to create better understanding and closer relationships between citizens 
living in rural America and those who inhabit the towns and cities. It highlights 
the main areas in xfhich misunderstanding exists and undertakes to correct some false 
ideas that may exist on farms and in metropolitan areas. The points are: 

1. Food is a bargain in America. Americans lead the world by a wide margin, 
both in the small portion of income needed to buy food and in the high quality of 
food consumed. 

2. Industry and agriculture have worked together to provide this food, industry 
providing efficient tools for the farm and facilities for converting raw farm products 
into fine food. Wholesalers and retailers distribute it efficiently at low cost, 

3. Progress has been possible because farmers and industry both have made a 
profit. 

4. Much of the tax billions allocated to agriculture are used for such services 

as agricultural education, research, school lunches, foreign aid, regulatory work 
and similar activities— not to farmers as direct subsidies, 

5. The American food supply is the most wholesome in the world in spite of 
"scare 11 reports about radioactive fallout, farm chemicals and cancer. 

6. A responsibility as citizens to improve farm-city understanding calls for 
studying facts, correcting mistaken impressions through discussion and urging others 
to take a personal interest in better understanding, 

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From Bill Lyons 11 - 1 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLinOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



FREEBURG, ILL., Nov. — H.W. Miller, Southern Illinois University swine 
production specialist, will discuss swine breeding and feeding at an evening 
meeting for farmers in Freeburg Monday (Nov, 12). 

The meeting will begin at p.m. in Freeburg High School. Vocational 
agriculture instructor Edward Mobley arranged the session, co-sponsored by the 
SIU School of Agriculture, SIU Division of Technical and Adult Education, and 
the local high school. 

Miller joined the SIU agriculture faculty in 1961 after three years on the 
University of Tennessee staff. He holds a doctorate in animal nutrition from the 
University of Kentucky and other degrees from Iowa State University and the 
University of Tennessee. He is a native of Moline. 



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From Bill Lyons 11-1-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY J~/f 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

Number 479 in a weekly series — "It Happened in Southern Illinois" -- a series 
consisting of regional folklore and historical accounts suitable for feature, 
column, or editorial use, 

SNIFFING AN ALBUM OF ODORS 

By John W, Allen 

Southern Illinois University 

One never knows where a trivial thought may lead him. A few measures from the 
music of an old song or phrases from an almost forgotten ballad often cause a train 
of memories to come trooping back. There also are other strange and infrequently 
heard sounds that arouse their echoes. Experiences like these are not unusual. In 
the present case it was not sounds, but an odor that started the memory mill. 

Instead of calling this particular appeal to the sense of smell an odor, one 
is tempted to say fragrance, for that term could very well be applied to the 
delightful smell that came from the crisp, buttered, oven heated slices of garlic 
bread recently served with thick juicy steaks broiled over a charcoal fira beside 
a woodland log cabin. 

Strangely, the memories aroused are not attached to some past feast, far from 
that. Also, they are not about garlic alone, though garlic, from its force of 
character, holds high place among remembered odors. In location, however, these 
remembered scents are concentrated, and concentrated is a chosen word. They are 

associated in memory with a one-room country school, the "Hardscrabble" of childhood, 

i 

The faint odor of garlic started it all, but there were several others 
associated with it, one of which was distinctly a rival. That was the arch stinker, 
asafoetida. With it came sulphur, coal oil (kerosene), turpentine, onion juice, 
weird concoctions containing goose grease, possum oil, tallow and beeswax, with 
occasional whiffs of camphor. These might be termed aids to health and classified 
as medicinal smells. 

Others, non-medicinal, could be added. There was the smell of soiled woolen 
clothing steaming beside the schoolroom stove, that of heavy felt boots that needed 
airing, and of leather boots newly coated with a dubbin made of tallow and beeswax. 

Most all the time there was no absence of odors, 

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Most impressive among the remembered smells of the well warmed winter school- 
room was the pervading and powerful smell of asafoetida. This malodorous gum came 
from Afghanistan. It was considered powerful, somewhat in proportion to the fumes 
it gave off. It was an ancient and highly esteemed remedy, being popular with 
Greek physicians over 2,000 years ago. Its powerful and repellant scent was 
thought to ward off diseases. That belief still lingered. 

Small tots, and some not so small, came to Hardscrabble school with lumps of 
the vile gum tied in small cloth bags and worn on strings about their necks. Some 
of the smaller ones of us, seeing these bags and smelling their contents, considered 
them somewhat as status symbols and thought that perhaps our unbelieving parents 
were neglecting us. Older children of unbelieving parents seemed pleased. 

In addition to being considered a potent defense against diseases breathed 
in, asafoetida had other uses. A piece of gum "about the size of a thumbnail" 
placed in some whiskey was a ready remedy for the baby's colic when given, a few 
drops at a time, at proper intervals. The last folk use recalled for asafoetida 
was by an elderly gentleman who, when fishing, placed a lump of the stuff in his 
can of fishworms. The reaction of the worms was not observed, anyway he caught fish. 

There was one more use of asafoetida, and that was to test a speller's ability. 
According to the speller used, it had to have the 'o' in it. 

Garlic seems to have been next up on the list of disease repellants. A bag 
of crushed garlic was worn about the neck. It too kept people from unduly crowding 
the wearer. There is a bare possibility these repellants were slightly effective, 
since they helped to furnish a degree of isolation. Garlic has its other uses in 
addition to being worn about the neck. A bunch hung above the fireplace mantle 
brought good luck. A few bulbs kept in the pocket and nibbled occasionally 
assured good health. If disease entered the home, bunches of garlic hung about 
would drive it away. 

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Feeding a child garlic would cure bedwetting or worms. For these purposes it 
was finely ground. Eating garlic was thought to cure bronchitis. It also was a- 
remedy for colds, rheumatism, and "lung trouble" when boiled in milk. 

When high blood pressure came into prominence, garlic was a folk remedy. It 
also enjoyed a vogue as a heart remedy. In many cases simply rubbing the soles of 
the feet would work wonders. Garlic bulbs and sulphur placed in the mouth of a 
mole's burrow x*ould bring the inhabitant into the open. Onions and onion juice 
were considered as somewhat watered-down substitutes for garlic. 

Sulphur came in for its place in the list of folk remedies and left its 
scented trail in the schoolroom. Mixed with lard or tallow it was an effective 
remedy for scabies or body vermin, A warm day or a heated room betrayed its 
user. Sulphur and molasses were about as regular as spring. They thinned the 
thick blood of winter. 

It is strange how some trivial thought can start memories. 



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SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Nov, 1. 1962 



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CAMPUS: Located in Carbondale, community of 15,000 approximately 100 miles 
southeast of St. Louis in orchard, mining, lake-recreation area. 
Main campus extends over much of town's south edge, centers around 
woods and 40-acre Lake-on-the-Campus . Carbondale campus includes 
test farms, Vocational-Technical Institute 10 miles east, and 
recreation-outdoor education areas at Little Grassy Lake eight miles 
southeast. Atmosphere is predominately rural-urban. 

EDY/ARDSVILLE CAMPUS: The Edwardsville Campus of Southern Illinois University, 
now nearing construction from $25 million share of Universities Bond 
Issue funds, will serve second largest population complex in the 
state. Enrollment at the campus' Alton and East St. Louis centers 
this year is 4,624, is expected to reach 15,000 or more in 1970 at 
new 2,400 acre site. Undergraduate and master's degree v/ork is 
offered. Education, fine arts and humanities are major areas. 

HISTORY: Chartered as Normal University in 1S69, opened for classes in 1S74. 
Remained Normal school and teachers college until university powers 
were granted by state legislature in 1943 and name officially 
changed in 1947. Three basic academic units in 1949 were Collegs of 
Education, Liberal Arts and Sciences and Vocations and Professions. 
In early and mid-50s, College of Vocations and Professions was 
eliminated with development of School of Fine Arts, School of 
Business, School of Agriculture, School of Home Economics, School of 
Communications and Division of Technical and Adult Education. 
Legislature granted SIU authority to grant engineering degrees in 
1961 and School of Technology was instituted. 

EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS: Among SIU's strongest academic programs are those in 
design, microbiology, chemistry, psychology, sociology, speech, 
speech correction, government, journalism and many areas of education 
and agriculture. Some recent additions include a department of higher 
education (graduate), nursing, Latin American Studies and a "Plan A" 
honors curriculum for gifted undergraduates. SIU offers 76 fields of 
undergraduate study, 21 one and two-year terminal courses of study in 
the Vocational-Technical Institute. Six Institutes offer special 
programs: Community Development, Labor, Latin-American, Rehabilitation, 
Small Business and Transportation. Center for Studies in Crime and 
Correction, expansion of doctoral degree programs, nuclear physics, data 
processing and computing, air technology, a new 96-hour General Studies 
curriculum required of all undergraduates and an Experimental Freshman 
Year project are among newer programs. 

GRADUATE SCHOOL: The Graduate School offers master's degrees in some 45 fields 
of study, PhD. programs in 23 areas. A sixth year program leading to 
a specialist's certificate also is offered. Strong fields are 
generally same as those mentioned earlier. Current research funds from 
University and outside sources total more than $2 million. Funds for 
graduate assistant ships average around $65,000 yearly. 

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SIU FOUNDATION: The Southern Illinois University Foundation, chartered by 

the state in 1942, is a non-profit corporation authorized to receive 
gifts and financial grants for the University's benefit. One of its 
main activities is helping faculty researchers by securing copyrights 
and patents and establishing market contacts for inventions. Several 
staff inventions now draw royalties by virtue of Foundation assistance. 

SERVICE: Service to the downstate area has been traditional at SIU. The 

Division of Technical and Adult Education offers non-credit courses to 
10,000 adults in hometowns each year. Some 600 residents get degree 
credits in extension classes offered in the area. The Small Business 
Institute offers professional counsel and assistance to small manufacturers 
and business owners and the SIU Community Development program has 
assisted 50 southern Illinois towns to originate local self-help crives. 
The Southern Illiniis Symphony Orchestra and Oratorio Society provide 
performance outlets for part-time musicians and the SIU Opera Workshop 
and various choirs perform in the area. Agriculture programs range 
from on-campus workshops for farmers to off-campus consultation on 
farm and forestry problems. Other services available to residents 
include fisheries management, various clinical services, industrial 
psychological counseling, employment training for the handicapped, 
labor-management assistance, local government research, trade-skills 
development, job retraining, conservation work, regional library services, 
and many more. 

SOCIAL LIFE: Major campus recreational facility is the Lake -on-the -Campus which 
includes beach and bath house, boat dock, fishing, hiking, picnicking 
facilities, miles of walking and bicycle trails through campus woods. 
University Center includes bowling alleys, billiards, usual indoor 
recreation. All manner of outdoor recreation available at Little 
Grassy Lake campus which features permanent improvements in way of 
dining hall, cabins, beaches, etc. SIU features very strong intramural 
program. Southern Players, student drama group, is well known for area 
tours, campus productions in school year and summer stock bill. 
It toured northern command (Greenland, etc.) Army bases under US0 
auspices in 1962, School is national power in minor sports (gymnastics, 
wrestling, tennis, swimming), is moving toward major status in basket- 
ball, football, track. Student membership in fraternities, soroities is 
perhaps 8 per cent of Carbondale resident enrollment. A forementioned 
Small Group Housing area, where Greeks live and eat, totals 15 buildings. 

SIU FACTS 

Buildings 



Major completions since 1950 
Power Plant $880,119 

Service Shops $502,784 

University School $4,162,832 

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Service Garage $203,954 

Woody Hall $1,972,811 

Life Science $1,761,517 

Library $2,447,615 

Agriculture Building $1,773,450 

Thompson Point Residence Halls $7,581,333 

Home Economics Building $3,200,000 

Family Apartments (Southern Hills) $3,053,121 

Small Group Housing $3,716,695 

Browne Auditorium $200,304 

University Center $4,600,000 

Anthony Hall reconstruction $657,000 

Other permanent bulidings ; 

Old Main (1887) 
Altgeld Hall (1896) 
Wheeler Hall (1903) 
Allyn Building (1908) 
Shryock Auditorium (1916) 
Gymnasium (1925) 
Parkinson Laboratory (1928) 
McAndrew Stadium (1938) 
Anthony Hall (1913) 






(including animal house, green- 
houses and sub-station) 

(first stage) 



(11 units plus dining center) 



(17 apartment buildings for 272 
families) 

(15 residence halls) 



(first stage) 



Major construction in vrrngress : 

Physical Education- 
Military Training Building 

College of Education 

Morris Library Addition 

Power Plant Addition 



$4,290,350* 
$2,900,000* 
$2,885,000* 
$785,000 



Ma far construction scheduled. 1962-63 ; 
School of Communications est. $3,250,000* 
Technology Building Group est. $4,200,000* 

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General Classroom Group est. $3,250,000* 
University Park Residence Halls est. $10,500,000** 

Ma.ior construction scheduled, 1963. Edwardsville Campus :*** 

Power Plant 

Library 

Science Laboratory and Faculty Office Building Group 

General Classrooms and Faculty Office Building Group 

Central Offices and Service Building 

University Center 

Communications Building 

* Construction from SIU Share ($28,250,000 for Carbondale Campus) of 

Universities Bond Issue funds. 
** Financing from government and commercial self -liquidating loans 
*** From SIU share ($25,000,000 for Edwardsville Campus) of Universities Bond 

Issue funds. 

Building and Operating Appropriations . past 10 years ; 



Year 
1951-53 


Building 
$560,000 


Operations 
$7,612,400 


Enrollment 
3,036 ('52) 


1953-55 


$3,053,510 


$8,748,900 


4,619 ('54) 


1955-57 


$5,665,000 


$14,677,426 


6,255 ( ! 56) 


1957-59 


$6,000,000 


$22,902,139 


10,518 ('58) 


1959-61 


$6,800,000 


$31,511,850 


13,332 (»60) 


1961-63 


$1,531,250* 
$53,250,000** 


$42,200,000 


16,243 062) 



* Reappropriated from General Revenue 

** Universities Bond Issue funds, Carbondale and Edwardsville 

University land holdings (As of Sept. 30. 1962 ) 

SIU owned— 6,900*04 acres (includes 159.92 acres at Edwardsville Campus and 

1,303,37 acres at Little Grassy Lake Campus) 

SIU leased— 589,65 acres 

SIU Foundation owned — 1,031.16 acres (includes 513.09 acres at Edwardsville Campus) 

Total acreage — 8,520.85 acres 

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Enrollment. Fall. 1962 

Carbondale Campus 11,619 

Edwardsville Campus A. 624 

Total 16,243 



( 1961 ) 
(10,311) 

(14,628) 



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SIU Rank. National Enrollment — 26th (full time Students ) 



Enrollment by Academic Classifications. Fall. 1962. (Carbondale Campus) : 



Experimental Freshman Year — 220 
Agriculture — 585 
Business — 1, 009 
Communications — 342 
Education— 2,946 
Fine Arts— 251 
Home Economics — 338 



Liberal Arts and Sciences — 2,840 

Nursing — 91 

Technology — 433 

Small Business Institute — 22 

Unclassified Undergraduates — 610 

Vocational-Technical Institute — 697 

Graduate— 1,257 



Faculty and Staff (Oct. 1. 1962) : 

Faculty in tenure ranks — 758 

Civil Service — 765 (Carbondale Campus) 

On-campus student employes — Average 2,000 monthly 

University Hpusing Capacity (Cob. 1. 1962) : 

Small Group Housing — 444- men; 238 women 

Chautauqua Apartments — 37 families 

Dowdell Halls— 210 men 

Illinois Avenue Residence Halls — 49 men 

Southern Acres Residential Area— 257 men (residence halls; 46 cooperatives; 44 

families (apartments) 

Southern Hills Apartments — 272 families 

Thompson Point Residence Halls — 734 men; 613 women 

University Avenue Residence Hall — 27 women 

University Trailer Courts — 53 families 

Woody Hall — 446 women (including 24 in temporary lounge space) 

University Courts — 16 faculty families (visiting professors) 



Total: 3,064 single students 
406 student families 
16 faculty families 



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University Rousing Construction Planned:* 

University Park Group — 17-story dormitory for 800 women; three four-story 

residence halls for 1,000 men, and a commons building. 
Estimated start, winter 1963; estimated cost, $10,500,000. 

* (All permantnt housing and University Center at SIU have been financed 

through revenue bonds, to be retired from rental and service income. Federal 
Housing and Home Finance Agency has purchased more than $15 million in SIU 
dormitory and University Center revenue bonds. University Park issue — half 
already spoken for by HHFA— will bring to $30,655,000 total bond sales for 
housing at SIU since Woody Hall construction in 1953). 

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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



S/0 



11-2-62 



Release: IMMEIDATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — "Don't forget the resistance movement; it's ready to 
go if the Cuban people know the United States is on their side." 

That's -he plea of Luis Baralt, Cuban refugee professor at Southern Illinois 
University and formerly one of the most distinguished faculty members at the 
University of Havana, He is convinced that "a large proportion of Cuba's six 
million people are ready to fight Castio if they're backed by the U.S. and the 
Organization of American States." He says preparation of Cuban refugee elements is 
important, but that "it's just a drop in the bucket compared to the resistance 
potential inside Cuba today*" 

The white-haired visiting professor of foreign languages and philosophy has been 
at SIU since 1960. He fled the island after having been pressured into resigning 
as dean of the School of Philosophy and Letters, then being forcibly retired as 
professor along with many other faculty members. As a member of the University 
Council, Baralt had incurred the revolutionary government's displeasure by opposing 
student demands for what he termed "arbitrary and anti-American statements" under 
university indorsement. 

Both Baralt and his wife, Lillian, a former practicing architect in Havana, are 
solidly behind U.S. moves in the Cuban crisis. But Baralt says control of the Cuban 
press is so tight most islanders probably "haven't a remotely accurate view of the 
situation." 

"Because of cruel repression, economic crises and the communist takeover 
Castro's popular appeal has dwindled tremendously," Baralt said. "In the beginning, 
the revolution was a beautiful spectacle since it was aimed at returning the country 
to normal democratic procedures after the overthrow of Fulgencio Batista. The 
people were cooperating in civic work as never before; it was the first sign of 
national solidarity in Cuba. Castro has betrayed all that." 

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Baralt and his wife left behind theia all their worldly belongings. Leaving at 
about the same time was their youngest son, Carlos, now a student at Lehigh University. 
Another son had fled earlier, and still another quit as Cuban ambassador to Canada 
in July, 1960, because he disagreed with the revolutionary government's communist 
leanings. He now works for a Spanish encyclopedia publisher in Chicago. Carlos 
brought along his future brother-in-law, Jose Menendez, who won a scholarship to SIU 
and is now a freshman history student here. 

"Castro has to be ousted," Baralt said. "If Russia is thrown out, a new 
government is elected and the effects of systematic indoctrination can be neutralized, 
then the people will see the truth. The Cuban situation is tragic because the 
revolution did not originally foreshadow such a drastic social upheaval, nor was it 
necessary." 

"Despite the talk about misery and a priveleged upperclass, Cuba's standard of 
living is actually very high. The country was more mature than others in Latin 
America in almost every respect. Castro exaggerated the need for reforms. Batista 
had to go, but Castro is much worse." 

Born in New York of Cuban parents, Baralt moved to Cuba with his family in 
1900 and was on the University of Havana faculty for 26 years. He never met Castro 
when the bearded revolutionist was a student, but said he was aware of his activities 
in student politics. He keeps up *;ith Cuban events through "Diario Las Americas," 
a Spanish language newspaper published in Miami, and from other refugees and 
friends ;*ho write to him. 



-pb- 



V 



From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Car bond ale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 






11-2-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — A river to river Shawnee Hills scenic road is needed 
across southern Illinois before the region's recreation potential can be developed 
economically, says a Southern Illinois University geography department study for 
the Southern Illinois Recreational Council, 

The report was accepted this week by the Council's Shawnee Scenic Highway 
Advisory Committee which submitted it Oct. 30 to the U.S. Forest Service for approval. 

The report suggests these major points about the proposed road. 

1. It should be an all-weather automobile highway following the high ridges 
as much as possible to provide scenic overlooks and linking the major recreational 
attractions in the Shawnee Hills • Access spurs to other points of interest should 
be provided. 

2. By tying together the present scattered scenic and recreational sites it 
will make possible developing and promoting them as a major midwest attraction in a 
unified manner. 

3. The road will provide a link tri.th existing north-south highways, giving 
access to major metropolitan centers such as Chicago, St. Louis and Memphis, from 
which vacation visitors could be expected. The major higtways are Routes 3,51,37 
or Interstate 57,45,34 and 1. 

4. The route would make feasible the development of restaurants, lodging 
facilities and other recreational attractions not possible at present, encouraging 
longer stays by visitors and increasing vacation spending in the area. The 
predominantly day time visitors average spending only $2 to $3 while overnight 
visitors leave an average of $10 a day in the area. 

5. The report lays out a generalized route without considering construction 
and right-of*way cost details. The western terminus would be at Grand Tower on the 
Mississippi, the eastern terminus either at Cave-in-Rock or Shawneetown. Cave-in- 
Rock is preferred. -more- 






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The proposed routing offers four natural segments in the road: Mississippi 
River to Highway 51, including the Pine Hills area; Highway 51 to Interstate 57 and 
Highway 37, including Giant City State Park and the bluffs of the Lick Creek and 
Feme Cliff Park area; Highway 37 to Highway 34 f providing numerous panoramic 
overviews; and Highway 34 to the Ohio River at Cave-in-Rock or Shawneetown. 

The report advocates developing three recreation catering centers in the 
area. One would be further development of the Crab Orchard Lake area recreational 
facilities. Another would be in the scenic Eagle Creek area between Highway 34 
and the Ohio River. The other would be around Cave-in-Rock which would give access 
to Kentucky by way of ferry service across the Ohio River plus other attractions 
already centered there. Adequate recreation facilities must accompany the road 
to make it effective. Catering centers would provide a variety of leisure time 
activities such as golfing, swimming, boating, fishing, horse riding, hiking and 
sight-seeing tours. 

The report suggests that current estimated recreational expenditures of $3 
or $4 million in the area could be increased six to eight times by well-planned 
coordinated recreational development in the Shawnee Hills recreation area with the 
advantages of the scenic highway. 



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From Bill Lyons 11-2-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — A Southern Illinois University alumnus, 
Thomas I. Brown, Oak Park, will leave Sunday (Nov. 4) for the South Pole where he 
will become one of those rare individuals who has visited both poles. 

Brown, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank C. Brown, will live a year in a snow tunnel 
while doing ozone studies for the U.S. Weather Bureau. 

He visited the other end of the earth when he was with the U.S. Weather 
Bureau in 1957-58. 

Brown, who was graduated from Southern in August, 1962 with a bachelor's 
degree in mathematics and a minor in physics, says through his research as a 
physicist with the U.S. Weather Bureau at Byrd Station, "we hope to find out more 
about the earth's circulation pattern." 

He developed his interest in polar regions while serving with the U.S. Navy 
in meterology primarily in Kodiak, Alaska from 1952-56. He also taught math 
and physics at Dongola high school (from 1961-62), while finishing his studies 
at Southern through night classes. 

At the South Pole, he said, he will live under the snow, with the facility 
comprised of nine inner -connecting tunnels. He'll spend 90 per cent of the time 
in them. The inside of the tunnels is packed snow and ice. 

Along with him, facing severe antarctic conditions, will be 11 scientists and 
21 Navy personnel. 

Among problems he lists: no mail from February to October; winds which may 
reach 80 to 90 knots per hour; temperatures ranging from zero to 85 below. 

But Brown considers it a "snap" compared to his life at the North Pole. 

"Here we'll have movies, *happy hours,* even a PX," he smiled. 



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Also at the antarctic venture, sponsored by the National Science Foundation, 
will be Clarence D. McKenny, Eldorado, who attended SIU in 1935 and is making 
his sixth trip to the South Pole. 

Among groups and studies to be conducted there, he said, are Ohio State 
representatives who will go on a traverse; the University of Wisconsin which will 
do a penguin study; Stanford University, which will study frequency noise signals; 
and the Arctic Institute of North America which will do studies on the ionosphere 
and aurora austraus. 

How is living there? 

"It's like people living in a fallout shelter, in close contact, and under 
severe conditions - except it's for a more extensive period," he said. "Fire is 
the extreme danger and water is at a premium." 

Why the water problem with all the snow around? 

"You can walk across this snow and leave no footprints. It's as hard as 
concrete. Imagine, we heat (xriLth diesel fuel) inside these snot*- tunnels with no 
worry about it melting. 

"It's actually a great life for students," he said. "You've never really 
smelled fresh air until you've gone to the polar regions," 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11-2-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



EDITORS NOTE LOCAL NAMES 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Poetry by nine Southern Illinois University 
students enrolled during the 1961-62 school year makes up "The Search: Second 
Series," just published by the SIU Press, 

The verse series was launched last year by the SIU English Club, advised by 
Georgia Winn of the English department faculty. Miss Winn said the series is 
sponsored to encourage campus students to "express their own fee lings... and, if 
the efforts justify, to receive the reward of seeing their verses in print." 

Judging of submitted material was by Charles D. Tenney, vice president for 
instruction, James Benziger and Robert Partlow of the English department, and a 
committee of English Club members. 

Student poets in the new volume are Margaret Stout Kent, Murphy sboro; 
Sharon Cogbill, Carbondale; K.K. Webber, Carbondale; Pat Mason, St. Elmo; 
George Kuehn, Glenview; Marilyn Mertz, Springfield (2349 S. 9th); William Rose, 
Murphysboro; Carol Singer, Carbondale; and Wendell Luke, Jr., Chelmsford, Mass. 



-pb- 









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Luis Baralt, Cuban refugee professor at Southern Illinois University, keeps 

up with events in his homeland through ; 'Diario Las Americas," Spanish language 

daily published in Miami. Baralt, who fled Cuba and came to SIU in 1960, thinks 

a Cuban at home resistance movement is ripe for action, given U.S. support. 

PHOTO BY INFORMATION SERVICE 11-2-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



>J> 







11-2-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. «- Interior design as a professional career has become 
one of the booming areas of home economics for students at Southern Illinois 
University. A new interior design laboratory was opened this fall and classes 
are crowding the tilt-top drawing boards. 

Fifty students are enrolled as majors this year, approximately doubling last 
year's figure, according to Marjorie Jones, who heads the interior design program. 
Three graduate students have started work toward a master's degree. 

The laboratory, located on the third floor of the Home Economics building, 
provides ample storage space for swatches of fabrics, carpeting and other decorative 
materials. A tiny "gallery" for honors -winning designs is provided just inside 
the entrance. 

Richard Henton, a housing and interior design specialist, has joined the 
staff this year. He and Miss Jones share in undergraduate instruction, while 
Miss Jones directs the graduate students. 

From the beginning course in which students laarn to floor plan, color-scheme, 
and execute simple elevations, they move on to study of both traditional and modern 
interiors and furniture; the decorative arts using textiles, glass, plastics, 
lighting, metals, hardware, pictures window treatments, floor coverings; the 
detailed perspectives for professional presentation to clients; and the economics 
of interior design. Finally, putting into operation all the skills and techniques 
of the whole program, they plan an entire house for presentation to a client in a 
professional project form. 



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Heavy line indicates general route of a proposed Shawnee Hills highway 

across Southern Illinois form Grand Tower on the Mississippi River at left to 

either Cave-in-Rock or Shawneetown on the Ohio River at right. Broken lines 

indicate suggested alternate routes. Light shading suggests higher elevations 

in the terrain. 

FHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11-2-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Fhone: 453-2276 




11-2-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



MILWAUKEE, Wise., Nov. ~ Far from being a "dead" language, Latin as a 
subject in high schools is in increasing demand. The real problem is finding 
sufficient teachers, Arthur Lean, dean of Southern Illinois University's College 
of Education told the Wisconsin Latin Teachers Association here Thursday 
(Nov. 1). 

Dean Lean, who taught Latin in public and private schools for 12 years before 
service in the Army and subsequent work in higher education, noted that there is 
a definite upswing in the number of students desiring to take Latin. 

But of almost half a million students now studying Latin, only about 20,000 
continue beyond the second year, Lean said, "a time when the student can really 
begin enjoying it." 

Lean told the annual Latin teachers meeting that he sees five special "values" 
in teaching the subject: a precision of expression; first hand acquaintance with 
the classics; a contribution to understanding English and other languages; 
appreciation of the classical content in early English and American literature; 
and acquaintance with a "durable, unchanging language." 

"Unfortunately," he noted, "much of the secondary school Latin is now taught 
by instructors whose major training was in some other field, and the consequences 
of such a situation are obvious. We are now reaping the whirlwind; placement 
services are receiving many more calls for Latin teachers than they can supply." 



-Ik- 



From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 







11-2-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



EDITORS: NOTE LOCAL NAMES 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Arrangements have been made with the Columbia 
Broadcasting System to use seven Southern Illinois University radio students for 
special election night coverage, Ray Mofield, of the SIU Radio-Television department, 
announced today. 

Mofield, an ex-CBS newsman, made the agreement with CBS news producer 
Bill Eames, New York. 

The students will pay special attention for CBS to the Dirksen-Yates senate 
race. 

Students who will be doing the coverage, listed by home towns, are: 

BAYLIS: John Harry. 

CARBONDALE: Paul McRoy and Charles Tudor. 

EVANSTON: Tom Hecht (3315 Dartmouth). 

EWING: Tom Stewart. 

LACON: John Kanive. 

MARION: John Harry. 



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Thomas I. Brown, Oak Park (left), a graduate of Southern Illinois University, 

tells Lucille Turigliatto of the Alumni Service his plans to work for the U.S. 

We/Tther Bureau doing ozone studies in the South Pole* 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11-2-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11-2-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov* — J. Allan Patmore, Southern Illinois University 
exchange geography professor from the University of Liverpool, England, will 
discuss British recreational geography at a public meeting in the Agriculture 
Building Seminar Room at G p.m. Wednesday (Nov, 7). The session is part of a 
geography seminar series arranged by David E. Christensen, SIU associate 
professor of geography, 

Patmore's topic will be "Waddling To The Waters: a study in British 
Recreational Geography." 

A member of the University of Liverpool faculty since 1954, Patmore is a 
specialist in urban and transportation geography. He holds degrees from 
Oxford University. He has traded jobs with SIU's Frank H. Thomas for the 
current school year. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11-2-62 
Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — Nicholas Vergette, ceramic artist at Southern 
Illinois University, has won the $100 Mr, and Mrs, Herbert Gordon Award in the 
New Horizons Sculpture exhibition in Chicago, The show, sponsored by Chicago's 
North Shore Art League, is currently on display at the McCormick Place Gallery, 

Vergette' s entry was a stoneware sculpture. 



-pb- 



The Carbondole Rotarian 

rbondale Rotary Club Meets Every Wednesday Noon at the Elks Club 

Charter Club No. 743 - May I, 1920 



Vol. 5 Mo. 10 Itoemhjar a, 1Q6? 



HAIL THE MEW EDITOR , Fresh from the far off places of the Orient and with a handful 
of newly sharpened goose quill pens, Charles (Rover Boy) Clayton has consented to 
demonstrate the skills he has learned during the past year by resuming editorship 
of The Rotarian. We have been assured it will be more dignified and scholarly than 
it has been under the interim management of the drumbeaters and perhaps even a 
little bit cultural as Charley draws upon mystic knowledge of ancient Chinese arts 
to impart a certain something to the memographed page. Be that as it may, we speak 
for the entire membership in welcoming back the editor-in-chief to The Rotarian. 

LAST WEEK a goodly passel of Rotarians (they had to set an extra table and water the 
saurkraut) heard the story of academic and vocational counseling at Carbondale 
Community High School, as told by chief counselor Harold R. O'Neil. Club members 
also had the opportunity to meet two outstanding high school students, 
Mary Ellen Bahr, who plans to become a nurse, and Bob Monroe, who can't decide 
between counseling and civil engineering* O'Neil explained that the Carbondale high 
school program of guidance and counseling bids fair to be a model for the state and 
involves not only several phases of testing but also numerous interviews with studentt 
and the promise of always being available for talks when special problems arise. 
The speaker also explained an experimental program being started which will assist 
seniors in preparing for their college entrance exams. Superintendent O.K. Bowen 
provided the dash of humor needed for a good program by dryly remarking it was too 
bad counseling wasn't available when Tom Easterly was in school here, an inference 
President Tom vehemently denied, 

NEXT WEEK Frank Klingberg will present the program which deals x*ith the Rotary 
Foundation and its fellowships for foreign study. Speaker will be David Lauerman 
of Mascoutah, a graduate student at SIU who is waiting until March to start his 
year's fellowship study in New Zealand. The following week (Nov. 14) will be a 
salute to National Education Week, and the speaker will be SIU's visiting professor 
George S. Counts, an authority on the Soviet educational system, whose topic 
naturally will be, "What Can We Learn from Soviet Education?" 

Charles Clayton will tell (Nov. 21) of his experiences and observations while 
farmed out to the Formosa educational system and Joseph P. Vavara will round out 

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The Carbondale Rotation 

• ar bondale Rotary Club Meets Every Wednesday Noon at the Elks Club 

Charter Club No. 743 - May I. 1920 
Vol. 5 No. 1G Nnvpnihgr X, I'M? 

HAIL THE NEW EDITOR . Fresh from the far off places of the Orient and with a handful 
of newly sharpened goose quill pens, Charles (Rover Boy) Clayton has consented to 
demonstrate the skills he has learned during the past year by resuming editorship 
of The Rotarian. He have been assured it will be more dignified and scholarly than 
it has been under the interim management of the drumbeaters and perhaps even a 
little bit cultural as Charley draws upon mystic knowledge of ancient Chinese arts 
to impart a certain something to the memographed page. Be that as it may, we speak 
for the entire membership in welcoming back the editor-in-chief to The Rotarian. 

LAST VJE3K a goodly passel of Rotarians (they had to set an extra table and water the 
saurkraut) heard the story of academic and vocational counseling at Carbondale 
Community High School, as told by chief counselor Harold R. O'Meil. Club members 
also had the opportunity to meet two outstanding high school students, 
Hary Ellen Bahr, who plans to become a nurse, and Bob Monroe, who can't decide 
between counseling and civil engineering. O'Neil explained that the Carbondale high 
school program of guidance and counseling bids fair to be a model for the state and 
involves not only several phases of testing but also numerous interviews with studentt 
and the promise of always being available for talks when special problems arise. 
The speaker also explained an experimental program being started which will assist 
seniors in preparing for their college entrance exams. Superintendent O.K. Bowen 
provided the dash of humor needed for a good program by dryly remarking it was too 
bad counseling wasn't available when Tom Easterly was in school here, an inference 
President Tom vehemently denied. 

NEXT WEEK Frank Klingberg will present the program which deals with the Rotary 
Foundation and its fellowships for foreign study. Speaker will be David Lauerman 
of Mascoutah, a graduate student at SIU who is waiting until March to start his 
year's fellowship study in New Zealand. The following week (Nov. 14) will be a 
salute to National Education Week, and the speaker will be SIU's visiting professor 
George S. Counts, an authority on the Soviet educational system, whose topic 
naturally will be, "What Can We Learn from Soviet Education?" 

Charles Clayton will tell (Nov. 21) of his experiences and observations while 
farmed out to the Formosa educational system and Joseph P. Vavara will round out 
the month and Ralph Gallington's tour as program chairman with a talk Nov. 28 on 
Soil Water Conservation in Illinois, 

TWO NEW MEMBERS were applauded into the Carbondale Club last week, Julian Lauchner 
who returned to Illinois from Mississippi to head SIU's School of Technology and 
Gordon C, Estes, who will have to remain as "doing something in lumber" until 
Secretary Mowry gets more accurate statistics. Myrl Alexander, chief of SIU's Center 
for the Study of Crime and Correction, is in the twilight zone between nomination 
and acceptance as a new member. Better open another can of saurkraut next week, 
the Carbondale Rotarians are on an attendance spree and their numbers are growing. 

GUESTS LAST WEEK in addition to those already mentioned, were five in number, all 
Rotarians. There were two ministers, R.M, Thompson of Mew Castle, Ind., and 
A.L. Jones of Murphysboro; another Jones, Ernest, of Benton; Wayne Bagley of 
Taylorville; and Jim McQuie, of St. Louis, Secretary Mowry, meanwhile, gleefully 
entered makeups for six local Rotarians who broke bread with other clubs: Dean Swartz, 
Col. MacMillan and Glenn Murray at Murphysboro; C.A. Parrish and Col. Mac again, at 
Herrin; Philip Kimmel at Oak Park; and Dean Swartz again, at St. Louis, 

POTPOURRI--George Hand is putting in some good licks in behalf of McKendree College 
accreditation. . . Phil Kimmel who returned from a Wyoming elk hunt by way of 
Washington, D.C., remarks "there are a lot of new members since the last time I 
attended". . . Bill McKeefery and Henry Piper attended a top level Buck Rogers in 
space conference in Chicago. . . Louise and Harry Curtis have returned from their 
trip to Seattle last summer (honest, that's the way the item was turned in) . . . 
Rotarians of District 606 have a travelling billy goat that gets board and lodging 
at each club of the district and then a quick trip to the next honored victim club. 
Wonder what happens to the goat when it gets back to the Virden club which originated 
the goat- pas sing routine. Anyone for hamburger in Virden? The Carlinville newspaper 
refers to the goat as the "area's much-sought-after trophy. The writer probably 
is a Lion, 

NOW COACH. NOW can I turn in my suit and go to the showers? 



Service CfLve Self ■ JL (Profits Jiosl QYL Serves 3esl 



CARBONDALE ROTARY CLUB — 1962-63 



VICE-PRESIDENT 
Max Sappenfield 



GOVERNOR DIST. 651 PRESIDENT 

Norman Beck Tom Easterly 

DIRECTORS: Frank Gumm, Ken Miller, Max Sappenfield, Bob Vokac 
PAST DISTRICT GOVERNOR: Lester Webb PAST PRESIDENT: Harry Goldstein 



SECRETARY-TREASURE 

Jim Mowry 



COMMITTEES 



CLUB SERVICE 

Max Sappenfield, Director 
ATTENDANCE 

Bryan Kimmel, Chairman 
CLASSIFICATION 

Carl Birkholz, Chairman 
CLUB BULLETIN 

Bill Lyons, Chairman 
FELLOWSHIP - 
SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 

John Q. Clark, Chairman 
MAGAZINE - 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Roye Bryant, Chairman 
MEMBERSHIP 

Clyde Winkler, Chairman 
PROGRAM 

Max Sappenfield, Chairman 
AUDITING 

W. B. Crane, Jr., Chairman 
MUSIC 

George Hand, Chairman 
LEGISLATION 

Herb Settle, Chairman 
HISTORY 

John Allen, Chairman 



Name Nickname 

Abbott, Talbert W. (Abbott) 
Adams, George W. (George) 
Armstrong, John M. (John) 
Birkholz, Carl K. (Carl) 
Bryant, Roye R. (Roye) 
Budslick, William (Bill) 
Bushee, Ralph W. (Ralph) 
Campisi, Paul J. (Paul) 
Clark, John Q. (John) 
Clayton, Charles C. (Charley) 
Crane, William B., Jr. (Bill) 
Crocker, D. R. (Don) 
Curtis, Harry C. (Harry) 
Easterly, Thomas A. (Tom) 
Eddings, W. L. (Tinner). 
Feirich, Charles E. (Charley) 
Fisher, Harvey I. (Harvey) 
Frazer, C. A. (C.A.) 
Gallington, Ralph O. (Ralph) 
Goldstein, Harry S. (Golde) 
Gray, Ralph (Ralph) 
Gumm, Frank L. (Frank) 
Hamblen, John W. (John) 
Hand, George H. (George) 
Hoffman, Paul M. (Paul) 
Hosley, Neil W. (Neil) 
Joseph, R. C. (Joe) 
Keith, Malcolm Robert (Bob) 
Kimmel, Bryan (Bryan) 
Kimmel, Philip (Phip) 
Klingberg, Frank L. (Frank) 
Koonce, Harry (Harry) 
Lee, W. D. (Doug) 

T nno T-fnu/arH R m R "» 



VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

Frank Gumm, Director 
BUYER-SELLER- 
COMPETITOR-RELATIONS 

Henry J. Rehn, Chairman 
EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE 
RELATIONS 

Curt Mann, Chairman 
FOUR WAY TEST & 
COMMUNITY 
GOVERNMENT 

Mason Parker, Chairman 
OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Neil Hosley, Chairman 



COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Kenneth Miller, Director 
YOUTH 

Paul Hoffman, Chairman 
COMMUNITY SAFETY 

James Wallace, Chairman 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Don Crocker, Chairman 
SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS & 
STUDENT LOANS 

Frank Klingberg, Chairman 
STUDENT GUESTS 

Chuck Southard, Chairman 
INTER-SERVICE 
CLUB MEETINGS 

A. R. MacMillan, Chairman 



ROSTER 



Membership or Classification 

Senior Active 

Edu. — History 

Gas & Oil Wholesaling 

Art Goods — Retailing 

Senior Active 

Motor Courts 

Edu. — Library 

Edu. — Sociology 

Edu. — High School Principal 

Edu. — Journal Publishing 

Accounting Service 

Christianity — Prostestantism 

Senior Active 

Decorating materials — Retailing 

Heating Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Zoology 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Industrial Education 

Men's Furnishings — Retailing 

Real Estate Agency 

Associations — YMCA Director 

Edu. — Computing Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Marketing 

Edu. — Forestry 

R.R. Transp. — Dispatching 

Plastics — Mfg. 

Petroleum — Production 

Taxi Service 

Edu. — Government 

R.R. Transp. — Div. Supt. 

Television — Service 



FHi 



Imirnali«m 



Name Nickname 

Mann, Curt F. (Curt) 
Mars, John T. (John) 
McKeefery, William J. (Bill) 
McRoy, Paul F. (Paul) 
Miller, Kenneth R. (Ken) 
Mowry, James B. (Jim) 
Murray, Glen H. (Glen) 
Murrie, B. J. (B.J.) 
Nagel, William E. (Bill) 
Neunlist, Dempsey V. (D.V.) 
Parker, H. M. (Mason) 
Parrish, Carl A. (Cap) 
Parrish, Gordon A. (Gordon) 
Pulley, Charles (Charles) 
Rehn, Henry J. (Henry) 
Renfro, Louis F. (L.F.) 
Sappenfield, Max M. (Max) 
Sederlin, Elvin L. (E.L.) 
Semar, Preston 
Settle, Herbert B. (Herb) 
Southard, Charles (Chuck) 
Stafford, Eugene (Gene) 
Swartz, Willis G. (Bill) 
Swick, Ralph D. (Ralph) 
Veath, Irose J. (I. J.) 
Vokac, Robert B. (Bob) 
Wiegand, G. Carl (Carl) 
Winkler, Clyde V. (Clyde) 
Allen, John W. (John) 
Davis, Robert W., (Bob) 
Dill, John D. (John) 
Hodge, John R. (John) 
J or don, Roy V. (Roy) 

I pnt7 F n rGiKi_ 



INTERNATIONAL SERVIC 

Robert Vokac, Director 
INTERNATIONAL 
CONTACTS 

Howard Long, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Paul Campisi, Chairman 
ROTARY FOUNDATION 

Wilis Swartz, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
STUDENT PROJECTS 

Ralph Bushee, Chairman 



Membership or Classificatioi 

Men's Clothing — Retailing 

Banking — Savings 

Edu. — Admin. Acad. Affj 

Broadcasting Services 

Edu. — University Admin. 

Horticulture — Research 

House Furniture — Retailinj 

Building Construction 

Edu. — Tech. Adult Edu. 

Comercial Photography 

Elec. Light & Power Service 

Insurance — Life 

Milk — Distributing 

Edu. — Architectural Servici 

Edu. — School of Business 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Government 

Public Health 

Loans — Auto Financing 

Highway Eng. Utilities 

Edu. — Student Counseling 

Ins. — Health and Hospital 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Accounting 

Sporting Goods — Retailing 

Edu. — Placements 

Edu. — Economics 

Past Service 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 



No. 45G November 3, 1962 

S. I. E. A. NEWSLITTER 

ROSES to Ren Mollraan, who made his exit as TPA pres. with one of the largest meetings 
and best programs ever— for which he gave full credit to Art Strang... Ken established 
a "first" by not telling time-consuming stories on a crowded banquet program. • .He was 
just about the most relaxed president we've ever seen— which is a strong statement* •• 
More roses to Harrison Church, son of the Lebanon Leon Churches and U. of I. senior, 
who was awarded the I. P. A. $150 scholarship. 

JOHN DENSON. the Minonk miser, bought the FLORA DAILY NEWS-RECORD from Earl Wood and 
Co., effective Oct. 29... Even before the paper was purchased, the Densons had bought 
a FIVE BEDROOM house in Flora, plus acreage, and it was for this reason that they 
really had to buy the paper •••As John explains it, "My wife is a nut about flowers; 
now she has plenty of room.".. .They expect to move within a few days .. .Pauline 
Colburn, who has been Earl's editor, and Jean Tolliver will remain with the N-R, and 
a reporter or two may be added later to step up local news coverage. • .John D. also is 
likely to use local editorials regularly, and, when he has had time to become 
acquainted, we predict that Flora natives will be entertained— and possibly shocked, 
mildly— by the Denson column on which Minonk-ites have thrived for 16 years or so... 
Bob and Bill Denson will continue to operate the mint at Minonk... A notice last week 
read, "The MINONK NEWS DISPATCH office is prepared to get out wedding invitations on 
short notice..." 

BILL CROSIER , backshop man at Russ Hoffman's HIGHLAND NEWS-LEADER, will run the 
R00DH0USE RECORD, recently acquired by Paul Simon and Co. ••Bill may not get rich at 
Roodhouse, but he'll have glory, fun— and headaches •• .Two lines "stuck 1 ' with us from 
the CBS follow-up special on integration in the South. One was the reference to 
"respect that comes with understanding" (of individuals), and the other, "1 lost so 
much time because of hate." 

RAY JOHNSEN . home after spending a year in England, accompanied by his family, is 
back at the old stand in Troy.. .Has promised to send soon a letter sketching the 
highlights of the sojourn abroad. ..Ray was at Springfield with Elmer Fedder, the 
Metamora poet, and Boss Simon. . .We're still laughing over a letter received this ayem 
from the Voice of Olin. Unfortunately, or fortunately, it bore a note, "Not for 
publication, ever". • .Our guess is that Brother Jacquin was having a bad day and just 
had to unload on someone. • .Last time we did that verbally and directly and we thought 
rather well, nobody gave us any heed. ..The very least my targets should have done 
was get mad. 

ROSES to SIEA winners in the IPA contest, with extra garlands for THIS GIBSON CITY 
Kramers, first two-time winners of the Loorais award— plus 1st in General Excellence, 
2nd for Best Original Column, 1st for Best News Story, 2nd for Best Typography and 
Make-up, and three honorable mentions •• .To add frosting to the cake, Don Kramer, 
FAIRBURY BLADE, had four honorable mentions. 

KARL MONROE . COLLINSVILLE HERALD, copped a Best News Story first and an H.M...,Jess 
Stonecipher, ARCOLA RECORD- HERALD, won a Local Editorial first, a General Excellence 
third, a Best Original Column third and two H.M's. 

J. 0. LERE . LEROY JOURNAL, won a Best Editorial Page first, a Best Local Editorial 
third, and two H.M's. • .The Millstadt Mollmans took a Best Feature second and an H.M.. 
In Community Service, Paul Cousley, ALTON EVENING TELEGRAPH, nabbed a second, and Sam 
Smith , METROPOLIS NEWS, an H.M...And Charlie Feirich of the NEWS rated an H.M. on his 
column. >jMWWhfeMWb> 

Compiled by Information Service, Southern Illinois University, for the Southern 
Illinois Editorial Association, the Newslitter is made possible because of the extent 
to which area editors include Information Service on their mailing lists. (more) 



CARBONDALE ROTARY CLUB — 1962-63 



GOVERNOR DIST. 651 PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Norman Beck Tom Easterly MaTsap^nfield 

DIRECTORS: Frank Gumm, Ken Miller, Max Sappenficlii Bob Vokac 
PAST DISTRICT GOVERNOR: Lester Webb PAST PRESIDENT: Harry Goldstein 



SECRETARY-TREASURE, 

Jim Mowry * 



CLUB SERVICE 

Max Sappenfield, Director 
ATTENDANCE 

Bryan Kimmel, Chairman 
CLASSIFICATION 

Carl Birkholz, Chairman 
CLUB BULLETIN 

Bill Lyons, Chairman 
FELLOWSHIP - 
SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 

John Q. Clark, Chairman 
MAGAZINE - 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Roye Bryant, Chairman 
MEMBERSHIP 

Clyde Winkler, Chairman 
PROGRAM 

Max Sappenfield, Chairman 
AUDITING 

W. B. Crane, Jr., Chairman 
MUSIC 

George Hand, Chairman 
LEGISLATION 

Herb Settle, Chairman 
HISTORY 

John Allen, Chairman 



COMMITTEES 



VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

Frank Gumm, Director 
BUYER-SELLER- 
COMPETITOR-RELATIONS 

Henry J, Rehn, Chairman 
EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE 
RELATIONS 

Curt Mann, Chairman 
FOUR WAY TEST & 
COMMUNITY 
GOVERNMENT 

Mason Parker, Chairman 
OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Neil Hosley, Chairman 



COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Kenneth Miller, Director 
YOUTH 

Paul Hoffman, Chairman 
COMMUNITY SAFETY 

James Wallace, Chairman 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Don Crocker, Chairman 
SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS & 
STUDENT LOANS 

Frank Klingberg, Chairman 
STUDENT GUESTS 

Chuck Southard, Chairman 
INTER-SERVICE 
CLUB MEETINGS 

A. R. MacMillan, Chairman 












INTERNATIONAL SERV1Q 

Robert Vokac, Director 
INTERNATIONAL 
CONTACTS 

Howard Long. Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Paul Campisi, Chairman 
ROTARY FOUNDATION 

Wilis Swartz, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
STUDENT PROJECTS 

Ralph Bushee, Chairman 



ROSTER 



Name Nickname 

Abbott, Talbert W. (Abbott) 
Adams, George W. (George) 
Armstrong, John M. (John) 
Birkholz, Carl K. (Carl) 
Bryant, Roye R. (Roye) 
Budslick, William (Bill) 
Bushee, Ralph W. (Ralph) 
Campisi, Paul J. (Paul) 
Clark, John Q. (John) 
Clayton, Charles C. (Charley) 
Crane, William B., Jr. (Bill) 
Crocker, D. R. (Don) 
Curtis, Harry C. (Harry) 
Easterly, Thomas A. (Tom) 
Eddings, W. L. (Tinner) 
Feirich, Charles E. (Charley) 
Fisher, Harvey I. (Harvey) 
Frazer, C. A. (C.A.) 
Gallington, Ralph O. (Ralph) 
Goldstein, Harry S. (Golde) 
Gray, Ralph (Ralph) 
Gumm, Frank L. (Frank) 
Hamblen, John W. (John) 
Hand, George H. (George) 
Hoffman, Paul M. (Paul) 
Hosley, Neil W. (Neil) 
Joseph, R. C. (Joe) 
Keith, Malcolm Robert (Bob) 
Kimmel, Bryan (Bryan) 
Kimmel, Philip (Phip) 
Klingberg, Frank L. (Frank) 
Koonce, Harry (Harry) 
Lee, W. D. (Doug) 
Long, Howard R. (H.R.) 
Lyons, William H. (Bill) 
MacMillan, Alexander R. (Mac) 



Membership or Classification 

Senior Active 

Edu. — History 

Gas & Oil Wholesaling 

Art Goods — Retailing 

Senior Active 

Motor Courts 
Edu. — Library 

Edu. — Sociology 

Edu. — High School Principal 

Edu. — Journal Publishing 

Accounting Service 

Christianity — Prostestantism 

Senior Active 

Decorating materials — Retailing 

Heating Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Zoology 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Industrial Education 

Men's Furnishings — Retailing 

Real Estate Agency 

Associations — YMCA Director 

Edu. — Computing Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Marketing 

Edu. — Forestry 

R.R. Transp. — Dispatching 

Plastics — Mfg. 

Petroleum — Production 

Taxi Service 

Edu. — Government 

R.R. Transp. — Div. Supt. 

Television — Service 

Edu. — Journalism 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Transportation 



Name Nickname 

Mann, Curt F. (Curt) 
Mars, John T. (John) 
McKeefery, William J. (Bill) 
McRoy, Paul F. (Paul) 
Miller, Kenneth R. (Ken) 
Mowry, James B. (Jim) 
Murray, Glen H. (Glen) 
Murrie, B. J. (B.J.) 
Nagel, William E. (Bill) 
Neunlist, Dempsey V. (D.V.) 
Parker, H. M. (Mason) 
Parrish, Carl A. (Cap) 
Parrish, Gordon A. (Gordon) 
Pulley, Charles (Charles) 
Rehn, Henry J. (Henry) 
Renfro, Louis F. (L.F.) 
Sappenfield, Max M. (Max) 
Sederlin, Elvin L. (EX.) 
Semar, Preston 
Settle, Herbert B. (Herb) 
Southard, Charles (Chuck) 
Stafford, Eugene (Gene) 
Swartz, Willis G. (Bill) 
Swick, Ralph D. (Ralph) 
Veath, Irose J. (I. J.) 
Vokac, Robert B. (Bob) 
Wiegand, G. Carl (Carl) 
Winkler, Clyde V. (Clyde) 
Allen, John W. (John) 
Davis, Robert W., (Bob) 
Dill. John D. (John) 
Hodge, John R. (John) 
Jordon, Roy V. (Roy) 
Lentz, E. G. (Gib) 
Smith, Clyde L. (Clyde) 



Membership or Classificalioi 

Men's Clothing — Retailing 

Banking — Savings 

Edu. — Admin. Acad. Affairs 

Broadcasting Services 

Edu. — University Admin. 

Horticulture — Research 

House Furniture — Retailing 

Building Construction 

Edu. — Tech. Adult Edu. 

Comercial Photography 

Elec. Light & Power Service 

Insurance — Life 

Milk — Distributing 

Edu. — Architectural Service 

Edu. — School of Business 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Government 

Public Health 

Loans — Auto Financing 

Highway Eng. Utilities 

Edu. — Student Counseling 

Ins. — Health and Hospital 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Accounting 

Sporting Goods — Retailing 

Edu. — Placements 

Edu. — Economics 

Past Service 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 



AREA ROTARY MEETINGS— 

Monday Noon — Centralia, Harrisburg, Herrin, New Athens, O'Fallon 

Monday Evening - Cairo, Chester, Cisne, Columbia, Frceburg, Golconda, Mt. Carmel, Olney, Pincknewiile W Salem 

Tuesday Noon - Albion, Belleville, Chicago, Eldorado, Mt. Vernon, Urbana, West Frankfon mCktKyU " e ' W ' Sa ' em 

I uesday Evening - Benton, Carmi, DuQuoin, Flora, Murphysboro, Sparta, Waterloo, Wayne City 

Wednesday Noon — Carbondale. East St. Louis, Johnston City, Lebanon 

Thursday Noon — Anna, Carlyle, Fairfield, Lawrenceville, Marion, Metropolis, St. Louis 

rhursday Evening _ Marissa, Mascoutah, Nashville, Zeigler 

Friday Noon — Louisville, Salem 

Friday Evening — Crossville, Millstadt 



No. 45 G November 3, 1962 

S. I. E. A. NEWSLITTBR 

ROSES to Ren Mollman, who made his exit as IPA pres. with one of the largest meetings 
and best programs ever— -for which he gave full credit to Art Strang. • .Ken established 
a "first" by not telling time-consuming stories on a crowded banquet program. • .He was 
just about the most relaxed president we've ever seen— which is a strong statement. •• 
More roses to Harrison Church, son of the Lebanon Leon Churches and U. of I. senior, 
who was awarded the I.P.A. $150 scholarship. 

JOHN DENSON. the Minonk miser, bought the FLORA DAILY NEWS-RECORD from Earl Wood and 
Co., effective Oct. 29... Even before the paper was purchased, the Densons had bought 
a FIVE BEDROOM house in Flora, plus acreage, and it was for this reason that they 
really had to buy the paper •• .As John explains it, "My wife is a nut about flowers; 
now she has plenty of room. ".. .They expect to move within a few days .. .Pauline 
Colburn, who has been Earl's editor, and Jean Tolliver will remain with the N-R, and 
a reporter or two may be added later to step up local news coverage. • .John D. also is 
likely to use local editorials regularly, and, when he has had time to become 
acquainted, we predict that Flora natives will be entertained— and possibly shocked, 
mildly— by the Denson column on which Minonk-ites have thrived for 16 years or so... 
Bob and Bill Denson will continue to operate the mint at Minonk... A notice last week 
read, "The MINONK NEWS DISPATCH office is prepared to get out wedding invitations on 
short notice..." 

BILL CROSIER , backshop man at Russ Hoffman's HIGHLAND NEWS-LEADER, will run the 
R00DH0USE RECORD, recently acquired by Paul Simon and Co... Bill may not get rich at 
Roodhouse, but he'll have glory, fun— and headaches •• .Two lines "stuck" with us from 
the CBS follow-up special on integration in the South. One was the reference to 
"respect that comes with understanding" (of individuals), and the other, "I lost so 
much time because of hate." 

RAY JOHNSEN . home after spending a year in England, accompanied by his family, is 
back at the old stand in Troy.. .Has promised to send soon a letter sketching the 
highlights of the sojourn abroad... Ray was at Springfield with Elmer Fedder, the 
Metamora poet, and Boss Simon. • .We're still laughing over a letter received this ayem 
from the Voice of Olin. Unfortunately, or fortunately, it bore a note, "Not for 
publication, ever", • .Our guess is that Brother Jacquin was having a bad day and just 
had to unload on someone.. .Last time we did that verbally and directly and we thought 
rather well, nobody gave us any heed. ..The very least my targets should have done 
was get mad. 

ROSES to SIEA winners in the IPA contest, with extra garlands for TH2 GIBSON CITY 
Kramers, first two-time winners of the Loomis award— plus 1st in General Excellence, 
2nd for Best Original Column, 1st for Best News Story, 2nd for Best Typography and 
Make-up, and three honorable mentions •• .To add frosting to the cake, Don Kramer, 
FAIRBURY BLADE, had four honorable mentions. 

KARL MONROE . COLLINSVILLE HERALD, copped a Best News Story first and an H.M...,Jess 
Stonecipher, ARCOLA RECORD- HERALD, won a Local Editorial first, a General Excellence 
third, a Best Original Column third and two H.M's. 

J. 0. LERE , LEROY JOURNAL, won a Best Editorial Page first, a Best Local Editorial 
third, and two H.M's. • .The Mills tad t Mollmans took a Best Feature second and an H.M.. 
In Community Service, Paul Cousley, ALTON EVENING TELEGRAPH, nabbed a second, and Sam 
Smith METROPOLIS NEWS, an H.M...And Charlie Feiricb of the NEWS rated an H.M. on his 
column. »Aft*A***A* 

Compiled by Information Service, Southern Illinois University, for the Southern 
Illinois Editorial Association, the Newslitter is made possible because of the extent 
to which area editors include Information Service on their mailing lists. (more) 



Page 2 



*o 



ED KIRKPATRICK . MCLEANS BORO TIMES- LEADER, came through with a second for Best News 
Story... Harold Holmes and Phil Hundley CHAMPAIGN NEWS-GAZETTE, drove over to pick 
up a second for Best Local Editorial and a first, the only award given for Promoting 
Newspaper, while competitor Bob Sink or the COURIER had a third in General Excellence 
and four K,M*'s. 

J OHN GLaNZNER . TRENTON SUN, won an H.M. in the Best Local Editorial category, and Bill 
Schmitt, MACOUPIN COUNTY ENQUIRER, an H.M. for Best Editorial Page... 133 newspapers 
were entered, but many from the southern Illinois area were not.,,Sam Smith, making 
one of his rare IPA appearances, was accompanied by an attractive young lady, his wife 
•••Sam definitely favors an SIEA contest for next year* 

TOM PHILLIPS gave the Pauscherts a break and brought them over from Pana...Mrs. Small 
brought her boy Curt from Harrisburg. ..Among panel chairmen were Curt, Karl Monroe, 
Charlie Jones and Jim McLaren, . .Brother Small's chief contribution was the story of 
a fellow whose building extended two feet onto a railroad right-of-way and two feet 
onto a highway right-of-way. When these structural errors were pointed out, his 
comment was. "Let's just forget the whole thing. I don't want to cause any trouble," 

THE EVERETT oMITHS . ST. ELMO BANNER, used what some Kansans back in the 30's called 
double duty dollars* Not only did they get to the meeting, but also they had a good 
visit with ti.t?r daughter, who has been working in Spfg. for some time. ..Harry Hillis 
reports that Ci.ney Community College will offer freshman courses beginning in Snpt., 
1963, sophomore, courses in 1964. 

EVERY SILVER lining has a cloud* No sooner had we returned from an enjoyable IPA 
meeting than we learned that the sage of Fair Hope, Ala*, Baker Brownell, scholar, 
teacher, philosopher and author who laughs at corny jokes, had been in town for a 
day. A great man by many standards (he went over Neosho Falls in a canoe), he has 
more of the common touch than most commoners, so even the Newsl. ed got to know him 
when he wa? here in the early 50's..*0ne thing about Baker is that if he possibly 
can see the least thing you've done that may be good, he'll heap praise... In my case 
he glorified my dogs. 

T'-JS RUCIC5RS . Bridgeport, must have had a good week on ads ...Roy and Bob both brought 
their wives to the IPA... Char lie Miller, twice retired, was the first person we met* 
He was crouched in the lobby, ready to pounce on anyone who hadn't bought a Photo- 
Lathe (Ad/.)... Set beside Glenn Luttrell, Edinburgh HERALD-STAR, at the banquet* He 
thought he might have been the youngest publisher in the business when he started at 
19... We think he would be fair game for Sec-Treas. Kirkpatrick come Jan* 1. 

PRES. RUSS HOFFMAN and his blonde conferred with various personages concerning the 

winter and spring gatherings— and received amazingly little help, which is par for 

the course.. .On the basis of past experiences would say a good meeting in January is 
assured* 

NOFETp GOODE, retired publisher of the VIRDEN RECORDER, seemed to be enjoying the 
IPA proceedings to the hilt* He brought some young people, the Charlie Joneses, along 
•••Maggie Boswell, formerly of the Southern Illinoisan and now assistant Sunday editor 
for the ILLINOIS STATE JOURNAL AND REGISTER, covered part of the meeting... Bob Howard 
of the TRIBUNE came over for the i/irgil Martin talk on public aid., # The Ace Ryans of 
Beecher City fame arrived Thursday night.*. J. Mulkin, HEREIN SPOKESMAN, paused enroute 
at Pinckneyville, where we were visiting with L. B* Sheley in front of the DEMOCRAT 
shop (John S. had gone to St* Louis)* ..Might have hooked a ride with Brother Mulkin, 
or vice versa, but be had to arrive in time for a 2 p.m. preliminary, and we didn't 
figure to make it before dark. • .John also returned that night, departing at 1:30 a.m., 
according to reports. ., Joe Go^sett, NORRIS CITY NEWS, has contracted for a new feature, 
the "Dear Sally" column, which he hints, "revitalizes the 'advice- to- the- lovelorn' 
kind of journalism*" -more- 



Page 3 

AFTER QUOTING Al Hodgson, WAVERLY JOURNAL, in various Newsl. eruptions over the years, 
finally bad the pleasure of meeting him and his good mate. As we recall, Paul Vannier 
"signed up" Al and Ken,Btaendle, aLcui: -seven years ago.. .Paul reported Ken has been 
making a rather prolonged hospital visit... Vera Ittnar, Highland, came to the meeting 
although he had been out of the publishing business a whole day. • .When Russ Hoffman 
read Vern's announcement that he was suspending publication of the Journal, Russ went 
over to the Journal to say, "I can't believe it". ..To which Vern replied, "Whenever 
we meet, just call me Santa Claus"...Russ, who will go offset by contract this week, 
has sold, sight unseen, to a fellow in Ohio most all equipment which had become 
"surplus". • .Then decided to buy a new car. • .Other dealers were so busy taking orders 
he had to settle for a Buick... Speaking of cars, Royce Bridges, the Vienna squire, 
did NOT buy a new, white Cadillac. Says it was an OLD 1961 model .. .Also kept the old, 
old car. ..Bob Bliss thinks anyone with a white Cadillac should be investigated. This 
matter will be considered at the January meeting. 

THANKS TO CARL H. WITTMOND we have a new paper on our list, the CALHOUN HERALD, and 
we presume that the publisher is State Representative Wittmond of Brussels •• .Although 
the old days of packetboats and showboats on the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers have 
gone, Editor Wittmond observes, "With the passing of time, it looked as though our 
only claim to fame would be our apples, but with the coming of automobiles, apple 
blossom time brought many people through the county, who saw other beauty, and again 
the rivers beckoned— cabins were erected, resorts sprang up— the air was refreshing, 
soothing, quiet, the ideal spot for a second home, seemingly far out, yet near enough 
to the city home for restful week ends. 

"These Old Rivers just won't let Calhoun be passed by." 

GERALL VEACH, FORMAN VALLEY EXPRESS, is Karl Monroe's son-in-law since two month's 
ago..i' r rs. Veach ; had been back at Alma College for two weeks when she answered the 
call o the EXPRESS. This paper covers Forest City, Manito and Green Valley ...SIEA 
Sec.-Ti *as, Ed Kirkpatrick had plenty of cash in Spfg. because Paul Vannier, having 
just sold his papers and being loaded, was the first to pay SIEA dues for 1963. •• 
With the acquisition of a slightly used Dodge (Adv.) the Vanniers are now a three* 
car, three-boat family, much to Dorothy's surprise. • .In case you are unfamiliar with 
boats, we can say with some assurance that this is much more significant in social 
circles than being a one-car, four-dog family. • .Paul was accompanied by editor R.H. 
Pragoset the new publisher of the BLUFFS TIMES and MEREDOSIA BUDGET. 

MOBY DICK FINFGELD . HENRY NEWS-REPUBLICAN, brought his pretty, black-haired mate to 
the meeting while grandmother kept the six-year-old twins... Les Stone, Aiedo, brought 
Herschel Blazer. • .The Charlie Mills, Vandalia, came for the past- presidents' dinner 
but had to rush back home to make more money... Bill Brooks, now a globe-trotter, 
fretted in St. Louis while his plane's take-off was delayed long enough for it to be 
an hour and a half late Friday evening. • .Daughter Linda, graduate studenting at Ohio 
U., went to Southern's homecoming, missing a chance to reunion with her parents and 
brother Bill, Prophets town... Bill Sparta Morgan helped grind out the resolutions, 
and Ho- re spoke to the Man upstairs about blessing the banquet victuals •• .Tom Mathews, 
Verle Kramer, Tom Lee and Dick Finfgeld maneuvered the nominations •• .The Lees were 
joined by son Dick and mate, Edwardsville stringers for the MARISSA MESSENGER. 

IN LOWELL COFFMAN'S BENLD ENTERPRISE is a political ad in Polish, we think,— although 
a couple of the office "brains" think it's Czechoslovakian. However, some have 
led us to believe nearly all Benldians were Italian— excepting the Coffmans, of 
course. . ..Tohn Allen Crabtree, publisher of the RAYMOND NEWS, was married Oct. 29 to 
Mrs. Helen Marie Welton, Virden— which may seem to conflict with an item "elsewhere 
in this issue". • .Maybe we have been strung by a stringer. 

HENRY B. FRERICHS. 75, St. Louis, died October 23 in a St. Louis hospital. A Ludlow 
service representative for more than 45 years, "Hank" was known and respected 
throughout the graphic arts industry •••Thanks to Harry Hellmann for passing the word, 

-more- 



, 



Page 4 

LUCIUS SMITH. DUOUOIN CALL has praise for offset some days but doesn't think the 
process is yet to the place— if it ever will be— where all else can be forgotten... 
He has been having quite a run on scratch pads one-half inch wide "for narrow-minded 
people"... You can give one of these to any narrow-minded person and he will not take 
offense because he immediately thinks not of himself but of another qualified 
recipient... Lucius observes that some machines have feminine quirks .. .Whatever could 
he mean by that?... He had praise, however, for one of John Sheley's female employees, 
"Lon Ann," who can fix most any machine by "using a hairpin and some fingernail 
polish. "...The CALL was scooped by a lunchroom a couple of weeks ago. When Frank 
Fox learned that the Hayes brothers had succeeded in retaining the Hambletonian for 
the DuQuoin State Fair, he plastered the news on the outside of his restaurant, well 
ahead of presstime for the CALL. 

HARRY STANTON was nowhere to be seen at the PERRY COUNTY ADVOCATE, probably gone 
fishing... Mrs, I. J. McDonald reported, however, that the only thing they needed 
more of was money, an unusual remark for a newswoman. . .Vince Van Cleve at Centralia 
said his staff was near full strength for the first time in months, with Bill 
Niepoetter, sports ace, shifted to city ed...But this would be short-lived— an A-l 

tape-puncher had announced she would be leaving in a few days Will Joy and Pete 

Seymour, AP, were hovering over the teletype watching for the Russians. 

PETUNIAS to Ed Schmitt, NASHVILLE NEWS, and wife, only persons we've encountered who 
reported a good fishing season, Ed's only explanation: "We found a new farm pond 
full of bass "...Ed's son, Roger, a dead shot on pheasants while attending Linotype 
school in Iowa some time ago, reports a good quail crop this year, which should 
encourage "Huts" Webster no end, 

AT CARLYLE . CASEY DEMPSEY had a "beaut" of a cold. He and son Warren have doubled 
the size of their shop since buying the UNION BANNER. They were still working on 
"the list," but Casey had taken time to catch trout in Missouri, and Warren had gone 
to the Illinois homecoming,,, We assured them Curt Small would be coming by, which 
he did. Had a woman with him. Her name was Small. . .Casey had succeeded in selling 
most surplus equipment, the offset wave not withstanding, 

AT GREENVILLE , we found Leo Reeves had gone to the Smokies after returning from the 
Ozarks; George Denny had been reading the Newsl. after delivering his papeis, and 
Brother Brewer was in the basement doing the work. We didn't bother him. Somebody 
had to get things done,,,L, B, Sheley has lost 18 pounds, on purpose, and feels 
better for it, ..It is his considered opinion that "there are fewer headaches with 
offset," although this has nothing to do with weight control. 

SO WE BY- PAS SEP DUDLEYVILLE and reached Hillsboro, where we exchanged "dark black" 
stogies with Sam Little. Sam, who is about 82, seems to be getting younger, probably 
because he has eased up on his work. He doesn't go to the office until 9 a.m. now. 
When he goes home he takes a bunch of newspapers along and nearly always has finished 
these by midnight ,. .At the "other paper," Rollicking Robert Bliss was trying to get 
Mary Lou Foster, who runs the place, to give him a buck so he could take his wife to 
the IPA past presidents' dinner. He knew better than to ask for enough cash to stay 
overnight.,, Tom was in the basement happily doing the work he knows and loves— single 
wrapping,,, Said school teaching was agreeing with George, Rather than replace George, 
Tom and Bob just divide his former salary,,. Had trouble getting out of the basement. 
The place has more than one door,,, Sister Foster never did find her savings account 
book. She suspects now that it was not lost but stolen, probably an inside job, 

AT RAYMOND it was learned that Publisher John Crabtree has been ill off and on for 
four months, hasn't even been in the office for a month. The high school principal's 
wife, Mrs, Krumm, and others are carrying on,,. Roy Clippinger, CARMI TIMES, is quite 
ill again. . .Somewhere along the way we passed John Brown's Body shop. . . .WILLARD M. 
RAYMOND, editor and publisher of the MOWEAQUA NEWS, has joined hands with community 
merchants to sponsor a 12-week Civic Loyalty program, including a full page ad each 
week urging subscribers to "patronize our merchants whenever possible," (more) 



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Page 5 

HARDIN COUNTY INDEPENDENT , Oct. 25: "The condition of Harry L. Porter, who suffered 
a heart attack October 16, is much improved. He is still in the Hardin County 
General Hospital, recuperating. He has been allowed to have a limited number of 
visitors this week." 

ERNIE SCHELLENGER in Vol. 1, No. 31 of the CHESTER NEWS gives this advice to young 
lawyers: "If you have the facts on your side, hammer them into the jury; if you 
have the law on your side, hammer it into the judge; if you have neither, pound on 
the table"... The Ryans, BEECHER CITY JOURNAL, ran a picture last week of A.J., who 
died Oct. 24, 1954... Which reminds of a pleasant conversation over coffee with A.J. 
only a few days prior to his death. The talk was mostly about— yes, quail hunting! 

HAVING MADE one of the two top newspapers in Hillsboro, the Newsl. ed would 
appreciate a little more respect from those who haven't... Following the annual 
exchange of black cigars-- in which the Newsl. ed has received far more than he has 
given (although it is more blessed the other way), Sam Little gave me two long 
paragraphs on the back page, including the not too subtle observation that my Spfg. 
meals would be free— one way or another... No matter that some of the material was 
questionable, or that Sam used the situation as an excuse for telling a story with 
a "bad" word in it... To wit: "The JOURNAL cigars are reputed to be sure killers so 
he was presented some to give to "friends* who abuse him professionally... He 
probably has no more than three alleged enemies— not quite like the old gentleman at 
a church service. The pastor had preached on the topic 'Forgiveness, ' and to stress 
his theme he asked those in the audience who had no enemies to rise. Only the old 
gentleman arose, and the pastor remarked, 'Brother, how do you account for not having 
even one enemy? I .. .The old gentleman replied, 'All the so-and-so's have died.'..." 

JERRY MAHLANDT . BREESE JOURNAL, raised to $3.50, Oct. 15, for out-of-county 
subscriptions... Jerry had a good story about a refugee from Red China who was 
befriended by Breese businessmen and the sisters at St. Joseph's Hospital... Jack 
Vertrees, WAYNE COUNTY PRESS, who brought to the attention of husbands that the week 
of Sept. 24-29 was "National Dog Week," noted that Illinois now has 1,283,000 dogs, 
that 951,000 dog-owning families spend some $10,000,000 a year for purchase, care 
and feeding, and some $637,000 more on medicare. And dogs don't pay income taxes! 

A COMMUNIQUE from Maurice Jones, JOHNSON CITY PROGRESS, requesting football tickets 
from Fred Huff, included this tender note: "Tell Lyons I hope he enjoys his new 
headquarters in Anthony Hall as much as I used to back in the Golden Age. Can't 
remember the co- Edna's name I dated, but she was interesting"... (Must have been to 
have made such a lasting impress ion).... Now that the CHICAGO TRIBUNE finally has 
carried the story, "Ship" Shipton's shift from professional journalism to drumbeating 
at the U. of I. may be considered official...Rae Holman, the office sage-ess, opines, 
"Housec leaning is so unrewarding; it only shows if you don't do it." 

THE MONROE'S . COLLINSVILLE HERALD, carried eight lucrative pages of a fall fashions 
section on pink, we think— or maybe "autumn brown"— paper... And this head on page 1: 
"Glen Sewer Wins 4 to 1"... Meaning, of course, that establishment of a sanitary 
sewer district was approved... Dave Felts, Lindsay-Schaub chain brain who has been 
lolling on vacation again, including Las Vegas gambling dens, tells of the young 
woman who thought the Bey of Tunis was a typographical error. 

FRED NA3TE R. publisher and co-founder of the SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN, was pictured in 
the POST-DISPATCH along with a fellow named Truman... Fred is still hopping about at 
the ripe age of 88...SIEA-ers will recall various occasions when he has hosted the 
whole durn association down at "Cape." 

K EN TRIGG'S ELDORADO DAILY JOURNAL reports plans completed for water- flooding the 
Waltersburg sand which has yielded about 4 million barrels of that lovely, stinkin 1 
black stuff since the discovery well was punched down in the Eldorado oil patch 
Dec. 20, 1954. -30- 



9 



From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



\ 



11-5-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. «« Parents of Sou>:Lorr, Illinois University students 
will be honored Saturday (Nov. 10) at the Carbondai.e campus. 

Parent's Day co-chairmen Marian K. Dean of Collinsville and Wayne P. Comstock 
of (423 Dodson) Geneva, said the day's activities will open with campus tours from 
9 to 10:30 a.m. A coffee hour for students, parents and faculty members will be held 
in the University Center from 10 to 11:30 a.m. 

From 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. a buffet luncheon is scheduled in the University Center 
ballroom followed by the football game between SIU and Fort Campbell, Ky., e : : 
1:30 p.w«, 

The various campus living area will hold receptions following the game, and a 
dance at 8 p.m. in the University Center climaxes the day's activities. 

Two couples selected as "Parent's of the Day" will be honored at the football 
game and other events. The couples will be announced Saturday. 

Members of the student steering committee for Parent's Day include _________ 

of . 

Note local Names: 

ALTAMONT: Barabara Sue Conlin, 131 East Jackson, Coffee hour committee. 
BELLEVILLE: Trudy K. Kulessa, 313 West H, registration committee. 

Mary K. Chultes, R.R.I, dance committee. 
CARBONDALE: Gerald M. Boughan, 704 N. Springer, campus decoration committee. 

Joyce Pace, 507 Poplar, parent's day committee secretary. 
COLLINSVILLE: Marian K. Dean, parent's day committee co-chairman. 
DECATUR: Pamela A. Newberry, 980 West William, coffee hour committee. 
EFFINGHAM: Linda K. Boals, 107 Eiche, £ampus decoration committee. 
ELMHURST: Janet Wier, 431 Evergreen, dance committee. 
GENEVA: Wayne Comstock, 423 Dodson, parent's day committe co-chairman. 
GODFREY: Barbara L. Weber, publicity committee. 
HOOPDjTON: Ann E. Benjamin, publicity committee. 

LOMBARD: Patricia A, Marshall, 65 N. Glenview, parent's of the day committee. 
MURPHYSBORO: Terry G. Hamilton, 1911A Walnut, registration committee. 
O'FALLON: Robert K. Gray, parent's of the day committee. 
PROSPECT HEIGHTS: Robert Bruce Wescott, tour committee 
SPRINGFIELD: Julie M. England, 2448 South State, tour committee. 

Richard L. Parnell, 1003 North 10th, publicity committee. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 

ATTN: RADIO-TV PAGE EDITORS 



SO 



/ 



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11-5-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Southern Illinois University's USIU-TV (Channel C) 
began its second year of operation Tuesday (Nov. 6). Richard Uray, operations 
manager, said an increasing number of schools and an "at-home" audience estimated 
at 80,000 are watching USIU-TV programs. 

A year ago there were few at-home viewers and only 35 schools who vere charter 
members of the Southern Illinois Instructional Television Association, receiving 
educational programs through Channel 3's facilities. 

Today, the audience, Uray said, sometimes reaches as high as 150,000 (especially 
on the "Play of the Ueek" series), and the number of schools has more than doubled. 

Carl Planinc, coordinator of instructional television, reports there are 
currently 83 schools a potential audience of 30,000 students -watching the 17 
educational programs. The schools are getting, via TV, courses in such subjects 
as elementary French (for fourth and fifth graders), art, music, the sciences, 
social studies and mathematics. There are "in-service" training courses for 
teachers in journalism, French, music, and one in women's physical education is 
being developed. 

Meanwhile the station staff is working on closed-circuit television. Starting 
in the spring of 1963, college level courses in English and health education will 
be piped into classrooms of Old Main on the Carbondale SIU campus. 

One of the big improvements made in the first year of operation, Uray feels, 
is in evening programming. Such programs as "Bold Journey," "Play of the Week," 
"Festival of the Arts," "Continental Cinema," are offering viewers top quality 
entertainment. 



-Ik- 



From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



t< 



11-6-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



ATTN: BOOK PAGE EDITORS 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — The University Press of Southern Illinois University 
has announced publication of a new line of paperback books beginning Jan. 14. 

Vernon Sternberg, director, said the new line would be called "Arcturus 
Books," and the first book in the new series will be "Maintaining Fishes for 
Experimental and Instructional Purposes," vnritten by William M. Lewis, director 
of SIU's Fish Laboratory. 

The book will also be issued in a cloth-bound edition simultaneously, with 
the cloth-bound costing $5, the paper -bound $1.45. 

Sternberg indicated his primary market would be the American college 
student. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbotidale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11-5-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — The fall meeting of the Randolph County 
Southern Illinois University Alumni Club will be held Tuesday (Nov. 13) at 
6:30 p.m. at the E & R Church in Red Bud, it was announced today. 

Paul Isbell, director of Auxiliary Enterprises for SIU, will discuss 
Southern's student housing program and a representative from the Student 
Activities Office will tell the group about SIU's student program. 



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From Bill Lyons 11-6-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, -- Thirteen night classes, planned for people not 
able to attend during regular university hours, have been announced by Southern 
Illinois University's School of Business for the winter quarter. 

Courses available range in subject matter from elementary accounting to 
teaching typewriting. 

Courses to be offered, hours of credit, and times and days of meeting, are 

as follows: 

ACCOUNTING: 

Elementary Accounting II, 4, 5:45-7:25 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. 
Elementary Accounting II, 4, 5:45-7:25 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. 
Individual Income Tax, 2, 5:45-7:25 p.m. Thursdays. 
Advanced Auditing, 4, 5:45-7:25 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. 

ECONOMICS : 

Survey of Economic Principles, 4, 6-7:25 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays, and 

Thursdays. 

Latin American Economic Development, 4, 5:45-7:25 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, 
Economics of Welfare, 4, 7:35-9:15 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays. 

MANAGEMENT: 

History and Theory of Management, 5, 7:35-9 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. 

MARKETING: 

Sales Management, 4, 5:45-7:25 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 
Marketing Theory, 4, 5:45-7:25 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays. 

SECRETARIAL AND BUSINESS EDUCATION: 

Teaching Typewriting, 3, 6-7:25 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, 

Tests and Measurements in Business Education, 4, 9-11:50 a.m., Saturdays. 

Principles and Problems of Business Education, 4, 7:35-9 p.m. Mondays and 

Wednesdays . 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 






11-6-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Dr. Ulysses Grant Dubach, Portland, Ore., 
political scientist, will discuss "The Meaning of America" at an open-to-the-public 
lecture at Southern Illinois University Thursday (Nov. 15). 

The meeting, to be held at 7:30 p.m. in Muckelroy Auditorium in the 
Agriculture Building, is sponsored by the School of Business. 

Dubach is national scholarship director of Sigma Phi Epsilon, holds an 
A.B. degree from Indiana University, an M.A. from Harvard, a Ph.D. from Wisconsin, 
and an LLD from Williamette. He taught at Oregon State for 34 years and served as 
deaii of men there. 

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CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — A four-day home decorating clinic will be held at 
Mt. Vernon Nov, 13-16 by the Southern Illinois University Small Business Institute, 
Ralph Bedwell, institute director, announced today. 

Each of the first three days will provide lectures by professional specialists, 
the first on paints and wall coverings, the second on draperies, carpeting and 
floor covering, and the third on furniture and accessories. The fourth day will 
be a problems clinic arranged by Marjorie Jones, assistant professor of interior 
design in the School of Home Economics at the University, aided by qualified 
interior decorators of the area, Bedwell said. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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11-6-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE , ILL., Nov. — Jack Brundage, advertising director for the 
Southern Illinoisan and president of the tri-state Illtnoky Advertising Club, V7ill 
be the principal speaker at the fall meeting of the club at Cape Girardeau Friday 
(Nov. 16). 

Brundage will tell members of the group about ''Advertising Budgets for Retail 
Accounts" at a 7 p.m. dinner meeting in the Blue Room of the Idan-Ha Hotel. 

Don Hileman, associate professor of journalism at Southern Illinois University 
and executive secretary of the organisation, said co-hosts for the meeting will be 
Keith Reed, of the Southeast Missourian, Cape Girardeau newspaper, and 
Charles Blanton III, of the Sikeston (Mo.) Standard. 

-lk- 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — Southern Illinois University students who want 
summer jobs in 1963 should make arrangements for them right now, Charles J. Carls en, 
assistant supervisor in the student work office, said today. 

A summer employment center at Carlsen's office has details on jobs at resorts, 
national parks, camps and in industry. Last year more than 500 SIU students used 
the summer employment program and more than 400 resorts, national parks and 
industries channeled job requests through the student work office. 

Urging students to seek jobs now, Carlsen said, "After January is usually 
too late." 



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From Bill Lyons X* v 11-6-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY -f °~ 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov, — Community development progress in 4b^ion, and 
Mt, Carmel communities, Saline, Randolph and Crawford counties is reported in the 
current issue of the Community Development Newsletter, issued by Southern Illinois 
University's department of community development. 

The Albion report, written by community consultant Robert C. Child, reviews 
steps taken to provide "facilities for recreation for citizens of all ages in and 
about Albion," 

The Chamber of Commerce, in 1961 voted to buy a 15-acre site adjacent to the 
high school recreation area for development as a park area. After combined 
community efforts, the park was equipped with a shelter house, water lines, 
concession booth, baseball diamond, new road and lights. In August, an "Albion 
Park Chowder" raised more funds. More than 4,000 people attended. 

Since that time, tennis courts have been added and Albion has hopes of a 
community swimming pool. 

"In the process," Child said, "something has happened to the community and to 
its citizens. Through their participation in the program, old friendships have 
been strengthened and new ones formed. Novel ways of doing things have been tried. 
The community has discovered that even a difficult project can be carried out if 
there is sufficient citizen interest and participation." 

The Newsletter also noted that the Saline Valley Development Association was 
entering its fifth year; that comprehensive planning has begun in Randolph County 
through efforts of the Randolph County Development Association; that Crawford 
County is holding joint community workshops for Palestine and Hutsonville; and that 
Mt. Carmel and Wabash County have entered their third year of community 
development operations. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




XI 



11-6-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Kenneth R. Hansen of Elwood, 111. and 
Joel M. Travels tead of (663 Niagara Falls) Buffalo, N.Y. have been named 
co-chairmen of the annual Christmas Week celebration at Southern Illinois 
University. 

The University Center Student Programming Board said Hansen and 
Travelstead will coordinate all activities for the Dec. 1-7 event. Christmas 
week precedes final examination week for the fall quarter at SIU and includes 
musical events, parties and dances. 



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From Bill Lyons 11-6-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

SIU NEWS SUMMARY 
FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION 

Parents of Southern Illinois University students will be honored Saturday 

(Nov. 10) at the Carbondale campus. The day's activities open with campus tours 

from 9 to 10:30 a.m., and a coffee hour for students, parents and faculty will be 

held in the University Center from 10 to 11:30. From 11 to 1 p.m. a buffet 

luncheon is scheduled in the Center's ballroom, followed by the football game 

between S-I-U and Fort Campbell, Kentucky at 1:30 p.m. The couple selected as 

"Parents of the Day" will be honored at the football game and other events, 

ft * * ft 

Now in its fifth year of operation, Southern Illinois University's Asian 
Studies Program can point to what its chairman calls a "sound and influential record 
of accomplishment." H.B, Jacobini, an associate professor of government who nox? has 
the Asian Studies Committee's rotating chairmanship, says the SIU program has served 
as a model for others. Approved courses in the area range from Chinese language to 
oriental philosophy, art, and comparative economic development in Asia. The 
committee also sponsors lectures, exhibitions and library acquisitions, all slanted 
toward the Orient. 

* * * * 

Latin as a subject in high schools is in increasing demand. So says Arthur Lean, 
dean of S-I-U's College of Education, and a former Latin teacher. Lean says the 
real problem isn't getting enough students.. .but finding a sufficient number of 
qualified Latin teachers. Lean says high school students get five principal values 
from studying Latin... a precision of expression,,. first hand acquaintance with the 
classics... a contribution to understanding English and other languages. ..appreciation 
of the classical content in early English and American literature,. .and acquaintance 
with a durable, unchanging language. 

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Southern Iilinoisans should be especially alert to the dangers of fire at this 
time of the year, warns James E. Aaron, coordinator of Southern Illinois University's 
Safety Center. Aaron said 3-thousand 4-hundred children iied in fires last year, 
and some 8-hundred homes are consumed by fire each day in the United States. To 
avoid a fire disaster, Aaron asks southern Iilinoisans to,. .be careful with matches 
and smoking materials... eliminate all electrical hazards... clean out old rags, 
papers, mattresses and broken furniture... check all heating and cooking equipment... 
keep basement, garage and yard clean... and develop a family exit plan and practice 
it. 

* * * * 

Albion, Illinois has a new community park - thanks to a community development 
effort working with S-I-U's department of community development. The park is 
reported on in a current issue of the department's newsletter. Community consultant 
Robert C. Child says Albion bought a 15-acre site in 1961, now has a shelter house, 
water lines, a concession booth, baseball diamond, a new road and lights, a tennis 
court, and hopes to have a community swimming pool. Child says in the process of 
getting the park, as he puts it.., "Some thing happened to Albion and its citizens. 
Through their participation in the program, old friendships have been strengthened 
and new friendships formed.,, Novel ways of doing things have been tried... Albion has 
discovered that even a very difficult project can be carried out if there is 
sufficient citizen interest and participation." 



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Needing only one more pass interception to establish a new school record, 

members of Southern Illinois University's defensive secondary are expecting plenty 

of opportunities this week when the Salukis host Ft. Campbell, a top service team 

quarterbacked by former Army star Tom Blanda. Southern's defenders have picked 

off 15 of the opposition's 87 passing attempts this season to equal a SIU record 

set by the 1955 club. Kneeling are inside linebackers Jim Minton, St. Anna, and 

Rich Slobodnik, Chicago, while Dennis Harmon (left), Watseka, Harry Bobbitt, 

Carbondale, Pete Winton, Williamstown, Mass., and Joe Rohe, Chicago, complete the 

group. Safetymen Bobbitt and Winton have accounted for nine of Southern's 

interceptions with five and four, respectively. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11-6-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




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U - 6 - 62 
Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — Competing against top teams in the three leading 
Midwest athletic conferences, Southern Illinois University lists eight meets on 
its 1962-63 swimming schedule. 

Coach Ralph Casey's Salukis are slated to open against Oklahoma of the 
Big Eight Conference Nov. 23 prior to hosting their own open meet Dec. 8. Southern 
will compete in the Big Ten Relays Jan. 5 and travels to Cincinnati, a member of 
the Missouri Valley Conference, Jan. 19. Iowa State calls at SIU Jan. 26 and 
North Central College Feb. 9. 

Southern will challenge powerful Indiana Feb. 16 and closes its regular-season 
schedule Feb. 22 at home against Minnesota. 



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CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — A quadrangular meet at Norman, Okla., highlights 
Southern Illinois University's 1962-63 schedule while a dual meet against Oklahoma 
State will feature the Saluki's home slate. 

Coach Jim Wilkinson's outfit, which last year placed sixth in the NCAA 
championship meet, opens Dec. 1 when it will compete in the Illinois Invitational 
at Champaign. A dual meet with Findlay College calling at SIU follows Dec. G 
before the Salukis travel to Norman for the two-day affair Dec. 14-15. 

The remainder of the schedule includes dual meets at Bloomsburg (Pa.) State 
College Jan. 12; at Miami (0.) Jan 26; Oklahoma State here Jan. 20; and at Indiana 
State Feb. 15. 

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CRETE: Denice Jos ten 

DUQUOIN: Roger Striker 

FREEBURG: Marianna Laughlin 

HEREIN: Larry Wade 

IUKA: Helen Clifton 

JERICO SPRINGS, MO.: Diana Long 

JOHNSTON CITY: Mary Felts 

JOLIET: Margaret Boydston (405 Grant) 

LAKE FOREST: Fred Rounsfull, Janet Proctor 

LAKE ZURICH: Barbara Nemeth 

MARION: Mike Sniderwin 

MURPHYSBORO: Beverly Todd 

OAK LAWN: Brenda Finn (6710 W. 95th) 

ORIENT: Zella Burton 

OTTAWA: Jim Cavatorta (301 Christie) 

ROBARDS, KY. : Sheryl Reach 

SALEM: Deanna Stevenson 

SPRINGFIELD: Patti Walsh (1512 W. Lakeshore Dr.) 

URBANA: Robert Sink (214 W. Vermont) 

WEST FRANKFORT: James McHaney, Joe McHaney, Ruth Batts 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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11-6-62 
Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — Needing only one pass interception to establish a 
new school record, Southern Illinois University challenges one of the top service 
teams in the nation Saturday afernoon when Ft. Campbell invades McAndrew Stadium 
with an impressive 4-1 mark. 

Coach Carmen Piccone's Salukis, who last week bowed to an upstart Northern 
Michigan club 14-9, need a victory over the talented Screaming Eagles to assure 
themselves of at least a .500 season. Currently owning a 4-3 record, Southern 
must travel to Bowling Green next week before closing out the season at home 
against North Texas State, 

Southern's best offense against Northern Michigan was its defense and the 
Salukis will have to be particularly alert this week to protect their goal line 
from the accurate-throwing Tom Blanda. A younger brother of one of professional 
football's all-time greats, George Blanda, the Ft. Campbell quarterback has been 
instrumental in all of their victories this season. 

Should Blanda and his Ft. Campbell teammates launch an air offense they will 
be attacking Southern's strongest defensive point. The Salukis have allowed only 
29 pass completions this season and have intercepted 15 of the opposition's G7 
attempts, to equal a school record set by the 1955 club. 

Harry Bobbitt, a Carbondale prep product, has been the Saluki's leading 
interceptor with five while Pete Winton, Williams town, Mass., has four and 
Rich Slobodnik, Chicago, three. 



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Seven Southern Illinois University coeds have been chosen to guide the 

1962-63 academic year for Angel Flight, an honorary adjunct to the Air Force ROTC. 

Angel Flight members are specially chosen for leadership, scholastic abilities, and 

talent. Southern's unit is one of the nation's largest. Pictured are (1 to r, 

seated): Judy Finley, Benton, Angelaires director; Paula Browning, Freeburg, 

commanding officer; and Jan Muser, Belleville, materials officer; (standing, 1 to 

r): Phyllis R.acina, Argo, Angelette director; Jane Dougherty, Arlington, Va., 

administrative services officer; Jenny Gentry, Carterville, comptroller; and 

Kay Woodruff, Hillsboro, executive officer. Wot pictured is Julie James, Houston, 

Tex., public information officer. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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Eigbt northern Illinois coed3 at Southern Illinois University are among the 

37 pledging Angel Flight this fall. Angel Flight, an honorary adjunct to the 

Air Force ROTC, is comprised of 60 girls specially selected for leadership, 

scholastic abilities and talent. Southern's unit is one of the nation's largest, 

Pictured are (1 to r, seated): Pam Allen, Galesburg; Adrienne Harast, Cicero; 

Janet Walendy, Clarendon Hills; and Mary Kirley, Kewanee; (1 to r, standing): 

Bobi Kokta, Chicago; Toby Ettinger, Skokie; Carol Spector, Joliet; Shirley Gold, 

Batavia; and Jane Dougherty, Arlington, Va«, administrative services officer for 

the unit a 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 












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From Bill Lyons 11-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Southern Illinois University, through its food 
and nutrition department, will assist the Illinois School Food Service Association 
to conduct a survey of salary and job specifications for school lunchroom personnel, 

Jan Harper, associate professor of food and nutrition in the School of Hoeie 
Economics, is a regional director of the association, and will cooperate in the 
study. She will be assisted by Mrs. Marion Stephens of Carbondale, a graduate 
student in food and nutrition. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11-7-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Yohanes Wolde Selassie, an Ethiopian industrial 
education specialist, left Southern Illinois University Friday (Nov, 9) for 
Washington, D.C., after two weeks* observation of agricultural engineering and 
vocational agriculture education practices and facilities in the School of 
Agriculture, 

He will leave Washington Nov, 29 to return to Ethiopia where he expects to 
teach in an industrial-technical school at Bahar Dar, This recently-established 
school will provide training in vocational agriculture and shop work. Little 
mechanization has occurred in Ethiopian agriculture, Yohanes says, and this is 
one problem the school's trainees will face, 

Yohanes, 27, was graduated in June from Wayne State University, Detroit, 
with an industrial education degree. He spent the summer at Braidwood, 111,, 
in a farm machinery repair and maintenance course at Greer Technical Institute, 
His studies in the United States were sponsored by the State Department's Agency 
for International Development, 



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J.J. Paterson, left, Southern Illinois University associate professor of 

agricultural engineerings shows Ethiopian educator Yohanes Wolde Selassie an 

instructional chart of a farm tractor gear system, one of several he uses to 

supplement laboratory work on tractors and other farm machinery in the SIU School 

of Agriculture agricultural enginnering shops. Yohanes concluded two weeks of 

observational study at SIU Friday (Nov. 9) before returning to Ethiopia as an 

industrial -technical school teacher. 

PHOTO BY INFORMATION SERVICE 11-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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Eleven southern Illinoisans are among 37 Southern Illinois University coeds 

who pledged Angel Flight this fall. Angel Flight, an honorary adjunct of the Air 

Force ROTC, is comprised of girls specially selected for leadership, scholastic 

abilities and talent. Southern's unit is one of the nation's largest. Pictured 

are (1 to r, seated): Annette Battle, Metropolis; Andrea Anderson, Scott Air Force 

Base; Sandra Sears, Scott Air Force Base; Jackie Goble, Trenton; Alice Poole, 

Salem; and Rachael Calhoun, Carbondale; (1 to r, standing): Bonita Deputy, Mt. 

Camel; Joyce Hall, Metropolis; Kathleen Wicker, Steeleville; Betty Borger, 

Carbondale; Michele Middle ton, Freeburg; Diana Brashier, Carmi; and Paula Browning, 

Freeburg, commanding officer of the unit. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 






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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11-7-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



EDITORS: NOTE LOCAL NAMES 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — Nine senior students in the Southern Illinois 
University School of Agriculture majoring in vocational agriculture education 
are practice- teaching in five area high schools this term. 

Each student spends six weeks in a high school vocational agriculture 
department. He assumes, under supervision of the local instructor, the 
responsibility for teaching day and adult classes and for home visits to inspect 
student projects. 

William Beldon, RR1, Windsor; and Joseph Berberich, RR4, Mt. Carmel, are 
student teaching at Flora. 

William Eagleton, Fieldon; and James Kuntz, 760 E. Benton, Morris, are 
student teaching at Joppa. 

Kern Doerner, RR3, Norris City, is student teaching at Murphysboro. 

Ralph Gann, RR1, Raleigh; and Robert Matthes, RR3, West Salem, are student 
teaching at Pinckneyville. 

William De Werff, RR1, Nokomis; and Lowell Heller, RR1, DeSoto, are 
student teaching at Trico of Campbell Hill. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11-7-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — Southern Illinois University will accept the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) invitation to submit research 
plans for possible subsidy. 

An SIU delegation headed by President Delyte W, Morris attended NASA's 
conference with university officials in Chicago last week and heard space experts 
project research needs for the decade ahead. Spokesmen for the federal agency 
that has a $262,000,000 annual research budget outlined areas of research and 
training in which NASA is especially interested. They described steps to be taken 
by colleges and universities in submitting research programs which would bear upon 
the nation's space exploration and which might be financed by NASA grants. 

Southern does not hold any NASA research grants at present, according to 
William McKeefery, academic dean, although Robert W. Hunt, one of its faculty 
members has been selected as an advisor to NASA. 

Attending the conference with President Morris and Dean McKeefery were 
Henry Dan Piper, dean of liberal arts; Julian Lauchner, dean of technology; 
John Anderson, coordinator of research; and Kermit G. Clemans, division chief 
of science and technology at the Edwardsville campus, 

"We will review our research plans and capabilities to see if any pertain 
to the nation's space effort," McKeefery said, "Southern wants to help Uncle Sam 
'shoot the moon , , M 



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One-armed Bobby Hight demonstrates the place -kicking form which has 
enabled him to attract rave notices in each of Southern Illinois University's 
games this season. Hight, a former Centralia (111.) prep star who lettered in 
football, tract and baseball, has booted two field goals and seven of 10 extra-point 
tries this season while averaging 52 yards on 22 kick-off attempts. A junior 
at SIU, Hight is majoring in forestry and carrying a 3.7 scholastic average 
(5.0 is straight A). 



Photo by PHOTO SERVICE 11-8-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: BMEDIATE 



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From Fred Huff , Sports Publicist 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone : 453-2276 




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11-8-62 
Release : IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. —Although one of the lightest players listed on 
Southern Illinois University's varsity football roster, one-armed Bobby Hight, 
a former Centralia (111.) prep star, is carrying more than his share of the load 
as the Salulds battle for a .500 season in their first year as an athletic 
independent . 

Hight, a junior at SIU who despite his physical handicap has already 
experienced more thrills in sports than the average college athlete, has given the 
Salukis a potent offensive weapon which Coach Carmen Piccone may be forced to lean 
on more in the closing weeks of the season. 

A place-kicking specialist, Hight has successfully booted two of four field 

goal attempts this season and seven of 10 extra point tries as the Salukis won four 

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of their first seven outings. Of the two field goal attempts he missed, one struck 

the goal post and the other barely fell short from 50 yards out. 

Both of Hight f s three-pointers gave the Salukis short-lived leads in games 
which they eventually lost to Texas A. & I. (14-10) and to Northern Michigan (14-9). 

Hight 1 s team value, however, is not restricted to the scoring column. 
Handling all of Southern's kick-offs, Hight has averaged ^2 yards in 22 attempts 
this season and his normal kick, which sails high as well as long, enables SIU 
defenders plenty of time to get down field. As a result opponents have averaged 
only 13 yards per runback this season. 

"He's one of the most valuable players on the squad," Piccone said, "and if 
he continues to improve next season I won't be too surprised if some pro club 
shows an interest in him." 

Hight isn't counting on a pro career, however, and would prefer to go directly 
into forestry work which he is majoring in at Southern. Prior to entering school 
here Hight lettered in football, track and baseball at Centralia and is an 
accomplished bowler and golfer. 

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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11-3-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Writers and would-be writers will have a chance 
to learn some techniques of the trade at a one-day \7riters conference to be held 
at Southern Illinois University Dec. 8. 

The conference will present several speakers v7ho have made their marks in 
various fields of professional writing and will provide a workshop period at which 
conference registrants may pose questions on specific problems, according to 
Jamec L.C. Ford, journalism professor and conference director. 

Fiction, "how to do it" articles, television scripts, science writing and 
other free-lance writing will be discussed, Ford said. 

The conference will be sponsored by the journalism department, the extension 
division and Theta Sigma Phi, women's journalism fraternity. 

Ford directs the magazine sequence in the journalism department. He has 
free-lanced for a number of years and formerly served as assistant managing editor 
of Popular Science Monthly and as associate editor of Fairchild Publications. 

Inquiries concerning the conference should be directed to Ford at the SIU 
journalism department. 



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Harold Wood, (left) chairman of the nationwide University Aviation Association 

and dean of Parks College of Aviation, Bast St. Louis, hands trophy to two 

Southern Illinois University students who placed in the Intercollegiate Flying 

Meet in Kalamazoo, Mich*, last weekend (Nov. 3-4), The students, James Mohan, 

(center) Cambria, and Al Woodwin, Harrisburg, took a prize in the "bomb-drop" 

contest. They represented the Saluki Plying Club which will host the spring, 

1963 nationwide meeting of the flying group at SIU. 

PHOTO BY INFORMATION SERVICE 11-8-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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11-8-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — Taking a trolley to the theatre isn't the pleasant 
venture it sounds like when you're in Zaka, Southern Rhodesia, Africa. 

What it means, said Dr, Richard V. Lee, director of the Southern Illinois 
University Health Service, is taking a stretcher (trolley) to the operating 
room (theatre). 

Dr, Lee, who is spending nine months leave from SIU at the Southern Rhodesian 
Chrisitan Hospital at Mashoko Mission in Zaka, wrote a letter to the Health 
Service staff in which he told of his duties and the many diagnostic problems 
he has encountered. 

"A major problem is treating many infants, who are near death after having 
been given 'muti' by a witch doctor for diarrhea* This is some kind of a root 
that has a powerful atropine-like effect," he said. 

Unusual aspects of the job include treating crocodile bites as well as 
tropic ulcers, yaws, malaria and nutritional deficiencies. 

The 35-year-old doctor said, "my genuine, guaranteed, general practice does 
not include auto accident injuries, coronaries, penicillin reactions or 
appendicitis, 

Dr, Lee is a graduate of the University of Illinois School of Medicine and 
has been on the SIU staff for eight years. His wife Ruth and three children are 
with him at the mission hospital. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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11-8-62 
Release: IMMEDIATE 



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CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — The Graduate School of Southern Illinois University 
is rounding out its second decade of operation with an enrollment of 1,257 in 
51 advanced degree programs on the Carbondale campus Dr. David T. Kenney, assistant 
dean, said today. 

He said graduate enrollment has almost doubled in the past five years after 
an explosive growth from 110 to 779 students during the 1947-57 span. 

The assistant dean emphasised the importance of the graduate programs, "as 
the training ground for future college teachers. 

"If graduate school enrollment does not keep pace with undergraduate 
enrollment," he said, "there is a danger of running out of qualified college 
teachers in the coming school population explosion." 

Enrollment the first year of Graduate School operation (1944) was 19 and no 
degrees were awarded. The number of students more than doubled the second 
year and two master's degrees were granted. 

By 1943 there were 167 graduate students and 36 degrees were awarded. The 
enrollment climbed to 1,003 by 195G with 262 graduate degrees granted. 

The doctor of philosophy program added in 1956 gave new impetus to the 
graduate enrollment climb. Southern awarded its first Ph.D. in 1959. Doctoral 
programs are now offered in 25 departments and 14 students won doctorates in 1962. 



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GENERAL MEDICAL practice in Southern Rhodesia includes a variety of ailments 

according to Dr. Richard V. Lee, right, director of the Southern Illinois University 

Health Service, He is shown with some of his ward patients at the Christian 

Hospital at Hashoko Mission in Zaka where he is serving as a staff physician while 

on sabbatical leave from the University. Patients in this photo include two with 

tropic ulcer, a snake bite victim, a boy with two broken arms and a post polio. 

Traction for the patient in bed at left is supplied by a rock hung over the end of 

the bed. 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 11-8-62 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



NO AUTO ACCIDENT cases, but crocodile bites and the yaws instead are some of 

the medical problems encountered by Dr. Richard V. Lee, director of the Southern 

Illinois University Health Service while serving at the Christian Hospital at Zaka, 

Southern Rhodesia, Africa. Dr. Lee is spending his sabbatical leave from the 

University in general medical practice at the mission hospital. He is shown'. 

performing a minor operation on a native infant. 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 11-8-62 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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Release: IMMEDIATE 



WEEKLY SAFETY COLUMN 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Having respect for and understanding of one's 
firearm and his hunting companion are the prime factors in hunting safety, 
Dr. A, Frank Bridges of Southern Illinois University's Safety Center, warned today. 

Bridges said hunters should keep in mind 11 points in the handling of 
firearms : 

Treat every gun with the respect due a loaded one; transport only empty guns, 
taken down and preferably in a case; be positive that the barrel and action are 
clear of obstruction; always carry the gun in such a manner that you can control 
the direction of the muzzle even if you fall; make sure of your target before 
you pull the trigger. 

Never point a gun at anything you do not intend to shoot; never leave the gun 
unattended unless it is unloaded; never climb a tree or a fence with a loaded gun; 
do not shoot at a flat, hard surface or the surface of water; do not mix gunpowder 
and alcohol; keep your finger out of the trigger guard until your sights are on 
the target. 

Bridges said a recent study by the National Rifle Association showed that 
major causes of firearm hunting accidents were: the victim moved into the line of 
fire; the victim was shot by an excited hunter; the victim was not seen; the 
victim was mistaken for game. 

"It is obvious," Bridges said, "that a gun can be a most dangerous instrument 
and that understanding and training are essential to safe handling and use. What 
one does to prevent the gun accident must be done before the accident happens." 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondala, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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11-8-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — Dr. Herman M. Haag, Southern Illinois University 
professor of agricultural industries, is one of 30 delegates from the Disciples 
of Christ (Christian) Church denomination attending a National Council of 
Churches conference in Pittsburgh, Pa,, Friday through Sunday (Nov. 9-11). 

Four hundred churchmen from various denominations are expected at the 
meeting to consider the theme: "Ethical Implications of Rapid Economic Changes in 
the United States." 

Haag, a member of the SIU School of Agriculture faculty since 1959, is a 
native Missourian who formerly taught agricultural economics at the University 
of Missouri and was director of research for the Missouri Farmers Association for 
12 years. He is active in church and community affairs. 



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From Bill Lyons ( -t * 11 - C - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois u , 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

ATTENTION: FARM AND FOOD PAGE EDITORS 

SIU COUNTRY COLUMN 
By Albert Meyer 

With Thanksgiving Day coming earlier in the month (Nov. 22) than usual, more 
and more persons are beginning to think about turkey as the meat dish for the 
dinner table, and how much it will cost this year, Bill Goodman, Southern Illinois 
University poultry specialist, said today. 

Government and poultry industry reports indicate that the price of turkeys 
will be a little higher this year than last. However, consumer costs will still be 
low enough to make turkey a good buy for the housewife. The 1962 crop is now 
estimated at nearly 91. G million birds, down about 15 per cent from the record- 
breaking 107 million of last year. The 1962 production still is rather large, 
considering that last year's output was 26 per cent above the 1960 crop. 

Heavier breeds comprise the largest portion of the turkey crop— 83 million 
birds, which is down about 13 per cent from last year. Lighter breeds will be down 
nearly 32 per cent to 0.6 million birds. Turkey growers suffered rather heavy losses 
last year while the consumer was reaping the benefits of over production in low 
prices at the meat counter. This year the producers estpect a more profitable margin 
and the shopper will face a slightly higher price in the market. 

Turkey production has become highly specialized, resulting in improved meat 
quality and flavor through selection, breeding, better feeds and other production and 
processing research. One eastern turkey farmer raises 700,000 turkeys annually. 
With modern feeds the best producers get a pound of bird for about four pounds of 
feed used. Turkey production has more than doubled in the last 12 years. 

Modern packing and merchandising methods are making the product more attractive 
to the shopper. Nearly all turkeys today are sold as "oven-ready" birds. Three- 
fourths of all slaughtered birds are federally inspected and a large per cent are 
graded voluntarily. This mass production and packaging provides a wide selection 

of bird sizes for the consumer at reasonable prices. 

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Gathering on the new University Center stairway at Southern Illinois University, 
Carbondale, are students and staff members for a special School for Towboat Masters 
conducted by the University Nov, 5-9, From left are, front row: Milton Goldstein, 
St, Louis attorney in admiralty lav?; Capt, Robert McCulloch, Huntington, W.Va., 
port captain, both program speakers; M.L. Clausing, New Orleans (228 Barry), student; 
Victor Honey, SIU supervisor in adult education; Amos J. Waddell, Charleston, W.Va, 
(429 21st W. St,), and Wallace Wiseman, Ashland, Ky., students; William A. McCormick, 
Pittsburgh, Fa., barge line safety specialist, and Charles E. Moore, Camden, N.J., 
RCA staff engineer; Otto Ball, Chesapeake, W.Va,, students; and Alexander R, MacMillar. 
director of the SIU Transportation Institute, 

Middle row: Eldon Shannon, Mt. Vernon, Ind.; James D, Jones, West Chicago; 

John Morman, Portsmouth, 0,; Charles Lehman, Webster Groves, Mo,; and Reese Lloyd, 

Fort Thomas, Ky,; back row: Cecil Hartsock, Marseilles, 111,; John Honeyman, 

Morning Sun, la,; Carl B. Trobaugh, Clarksville, Ind.; and Hezza Johnson, 

Huntington, W. Va,, all students, 

PHOTO BY INFORMATION SERVICE 11-8-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release* IMMEDIATE 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - G - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



EDITORS: Note local names 



CARBONDALE, ILL,, Nov. — Thirteen towboat masters from eight states returned 
to their jobs Monday (Nov. 12) after seeking new ideas in a special five-day school 
at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Nov. 5-9. Known as a School for Towboat 
Masters, it has been developed as an educational program to enrich the professional 
abilities of men of experience in the barge and towing industry. 

Col Alexander R. MacMillan, director of Southern's Transportation Institute, 
said at the school's opening session that challenging developments and the potentials 
for growth in inland water transportation has intensified the need for supplementing 
experience with practical knowledge of new methods and controls to help the men 
become better towboat masters. The Institute and the SIU Division of Technical and 
Adult Education sponsor the special school. Its program of instruction has been 
developed with the help of a Waterways Advisory Committee composed of SIU educators 
and officials of major barge lines operating on the inland waterways. 

Specialists in various fields, picked for their practical approach to the 
subject, comprised the faculty. Discussion centered on supervisory responsibilities 
and operation, responsibilities of the master, human relations, communications, 
comprehension and limitations of radar, labor relations, employe rights under 
admiralty law, and rules of the road on inland waterways. 

Attending the school were, by towns (and states): 

Illinois— MARSEILLES: Cecil Hartsock. 

WEST CHICAGO: James D. Jones (729 E Grand Lake Blvd.) 
Indiana— CLARKSVILLE: Carl B. Trobaugh 

MT. VERNON: Eldon Shannon (324 Audubon Drive). 
Kentucky— ASHLAND: Wallace Wiseman 
FORT THOMAS: Reese Lloyd 
Iowa— MORNING SUN: John Honeyman 
Louisiana— NEW ORLEANS: M.L. Clausing (220 Barry). 
Missouri— WEBSTER GROVE: Charles Lehman 
Ohio— PORTSMOUTH: John Morman (231S Elmwood). 
West Virginia— CHARLESTON: Amos J. Waddell (429 21st W.) 
CHESAPEAKE: Otto Ball 
HUNTINGTON: Hezza Johnson (1050 Sixth St.). 

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Prom Bill Lyons . a 11-3-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY \} /+ 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

Number 480 in a weekly series « "It Happened in Southern Illinois" --a series 
consisting of regional folklore and historical accounts suitable for feature, 
column, or editorial use. 

GUNBOATS OF THE RIVERS 
John W. Allen 
Southern Illlinois University 

Informed persons agree that Cairo, at the very southern tip of Illinois, was an 
important military center during the Civil War, The farthest south free-state point, 
it was the location toward which hastily gathered forces of both the North and the 
South were sent, the North winning the race by a few miles. In the earlier years of 
the conflict it easily was the most important western military center, the one where 
the national forces were assembled and organized into armies that were sent afield 
to subdue the rebellious South. 

The names of many men who became famous for their part in the war first came 
into prominence here. Among the Illinois men were Grant and Grierson, Lawler and 
Logan, McClernand and Turchln, and perhaps a full dozen others who attained general 
officer rank. Army activities there were great. Its often repeated designation as 
a military rendezvous is justified. 

In addition to the army activities centering in and about Cairo, a unique 
development that did much to change military history grew there. This was the 
gathering place of armored naval craft for use on the Western Waters. These craft 
did much to radically all change earlier naval practices. 

It is true that some armored craft had been built earlier and had shown their 
usefulness. France had one such vessel, the Gloire, in 1859. Britian had the 
Warrior Im 1860. Floating batteries on armored barges had been used effectively in 
the Crimean War. The way already had been pointed. The United States, however, 
did not have a single armored naval vessel at the outbreak of the conflict. 

When Union forces abandoned the naval yard at Norfolk, Va., early in the conflict, 

they scuttled a wooden ship, the Merrimack, being built there. The Confederates 

promptly raised the hull and began to make it into an armored vessel. When the North 

knew of this they sought means of defending themselves against such a craft. 

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John Ericsson, a Swedish born engineer, the inventor of the screw propellor 
that still is universally used, proposed a solution. He offered plans for an armored 
craft, even less vulnerable than the Virginia, nee Merrimack, that the Confederates 
were hastening to completion. 

Events moved rapidly. An act to authorize the building of an armored craft was 
passed August 3. On August 7 Ericsson submitted his plans. They were accepted by 
the naval board September 16, The contract for building the ship was awarded 
October 4. The armored ship was launched January 3 and hastily fitted for service. 
At 11 a.m. March 6 the tugboat Seth Low started for Hampton Roads with the newly 
commissioned Monitor, for that was the name of the vessel in tow, They arrived after 
nightfall on the eighth. 

The small Monitor took position behind one of the federal boats to screen itself 
from the view of the Confederates. The Virginia returned the next morning to complete 
its planned destruction of the remaining wooden vessels of the U.S. Navy, begun on 
the afternoon before. The vessels had been little better than sitting ducks. 

At the approach of the Virginia the queer- looking Monitor steamed out to meet 
it. The historic first battle of ironclads was on. The Virginia retired to its base 
with neither scoring a decisive victory. One thing however, was demonstrated, the 
long age of wooden ships and iron men was ended. 

Even before the clash of these two armored vessels, the leaders of both sides 
had foreseen that armored ships were coming. Three days after the fall of Sumter, 
James B. Eads, a retired St. Louis man with engineering abilities, was told to expect 
an important call from Washington, It came, asking that Eads come to Washington for 
a conference. Arriving there, he was asked to undertake the building of a flotilla 
of armed river boats for use on the Ohio, Mississippi and their tributaries, Eads 
accepted • 

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In a short time the work of converting steamboats into armored fighting craft 
and the building of new vessels began. This work centered at the Mound City 
shipyard that had begun operations in 1856. The national government took the yards 
over. The Ohio from Mound City to Cairo quickly became a great naval yard with 
4,000 men working around the clock. 

Large barges held blacksmith and machine shops. Likewise there were others 
for storage of supplies. Some were for woodworking, where timbers were shaped for 
vessels under construction, alterations, or repairs. There were barracks for 
workmen and military guards. An old cut shows great lumberyards with oxen dragging 
and hauling timbers about. 

Prominent in all this were the sloping shipways, remnants of which still may 
be seen. Up these ways the largest river craft were drawn on wheeled carriages, 
pulled by great chains wound on a steel shaft hundreds of feet long. Old drawings, 
bits of description, and treasured mental images of the 'ways' as they once were, 
impressed their great importance. 

This article endswith nothing said about the many historic armed craft 
associated with the locality. Some of these will be mentioned later. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



SO 



11-9-62 



Release: After 3 p.m. 
Nov. 10 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Two of Southern Illinois University's greatest 
morale boosters were acclaimed here Saturday at half time in the SIU-Ft. Campbell, 
Ky., football game. 

The University Foundation, a trustee corporation serving the University, 
was honored on its 20th anniversary. The Foundation in turn presented a $25 
gift certificate to John Rush, a talented gymnast who as "Hey Dog" has 
entertained football fans with his zany impersonations of the famed Saluki 
mascot dogs. 

Rush, a sophomore from Arlington Heights, dons a dog costume and mask made 
for him by the female cheer leaders and becomes a one-man pep club. He ranges 
up and down the sidelines, ignored by the real life Saluki dogs but thrilling the 
fans with his impersonations and dizzy cartwheels. 

The Foundation, started Nov. 16, 1942 with a $10 bill, now has assets 
totalling $1,343,998. It receives gifts from alumni and SIU patrons, administers 
trust funds setting up scholarships, distributes non-earmarked funds in the 
form of awards and prizes, helps finance research projects and follows through 
with aid in securing patents and royalties for faculty members and the university. 

"V7e think 'Hey Dog' will become a fixture on the SIU campus and we wanted 
to honor John Rush, originator," said Kenneth Miller, executive director of the 
Foundation. 

The gift presentation was made by Trudy Kulessa, a cheerleader who is also 
a member of the Foundation's student advisory committee. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11-9-62 
Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — Southern Illinois University's department 
of journalism is participating in the Third Annual Journalism Awards Program of 
the IJilliam Randolph Hearst Foundation. 

The program, consisting of monthly writing competition during the 1962-63 
school year, will award a total of $40,900 in scholarships and grants to 
undergraduate journalism students in the 43 American Association of Schools and 
Departments of Journalism in the United States, 

The ten highest scoring students each month, picked from a maximum of two 
entries from each school in categories of news, sports, features, spot news and 
editorial writing, will receive fellowship awards. The students' journalism 
school or department will receive matching grants. 

The three journalism schools or departments whose students accumulate 
the highest number of points during the seven months of competition will receive 
grants of $2,000, $1,000 and $000 respectively. 



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Trudy Kulessa, of Belleville, Southern Illinois University cheerleader, 

rewards "Hey Dog" for his crowd-pleasing antics during the 1962 football season. 

The real life John Rush, of Arlington Heights, a gymnast who ranges the sidelines 

impersonating the Saluki dog mascots of SIU, also received an award from the 

University Foundation for his contribution to school spirit. The presentation 

was made at half time in Saturday's football game with Ft, Campbell Ky, 

PHOTO BY INFORMATION SERVICE 11-9-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: after 3 p.m. 

Nov. 10. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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11-9-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov* — Thirteen towboat masters from eight states returned 
to their jobs Monday (Nov, 12) after collecting new ideas in a special five-day 
school at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Nov. 5-9, 

Known as a School for Towboat Masters, the short course has been developed as 
an educational program to enrich the professional know-how of experienced men in 
the barge and towing industry. Col. Alexander R. MacMillan, director of Southern's 
Transportation Institute, said at the school's opening session that challenging 
developments and the growth potential in inland waterways transportation has 
intensified the need for supplementing experience with practical knowledge of new 
methods and controls to help the men become more proficient in their work. 

The Institute and the SIU Division of Technical and Adult Education sponsor 
the special school. Its instructional program has been developed with the help of 
a Waterways Advisory Committee composed of practical SIU educators and officials of 
major barge lines operating on inland waterways. Working on the committee with 
MacMillan, Harry B. Bauernfeind, E.J. Simon and Victory H. Honey of the SIU staff 
are Gresham Hougland, Paducah, Ky., president of Hougland Barge Lines; Capt. 
A.C. Ingersoll, Jr., St. Louis, president of Federal Barge Lines; P.A. Johnson, 
Jeffersonville, Ind., industrial relations director of the American Commerical Barge 
Line Co.; J.M. Jones, president of Canal Barge Co., New Orleans; F.A. Mechling, 
vice president of A.L. Mechling Barge Line Co., Joliet (111.); W.K. Nestor, 
operations vice president for Arrow Transportation Co., Sheffield, Ala.; 
A.D. Osbourne, vice president of Union Barge Line Co., Pittsburgh; E.A. Schmidt, 
Cairo (111.), U.S. Coast Guard officer in charge of marine inspection; Capt. 
L.J. Sullivan, marine superintendent of Mississippi Valley Barge Line Co., St. Louis; 
and Robert Swoboda, Cairo (111.) vice chairman of the Marine Chemist Association. 



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Specialists in various fields, picked for their practical approach to the 
subject, comprised the faculty. The program included such topics as supervisory 
responsibilities and operation, safety practices and responsibility for sick and 
injured, responsibilities of the master, human relations, communications, 
comprehension and limitations of radar, labor relations, employe rights under 
admiralty law, and rules of the road on inland waterways. 

Here are some examples of subject treatment, 

William Nagel, an SIU Vocational Technical Institute coordinator of employe 
training programs, emphasized that know-how and experience are the foundations for 
operating effectively as a supervisor and requires knowledge on how to give orders, 
obtain cooperation, create interest in the job and solve problems, 

Capt, Robert B. McCullock, Ohio River Company port captain at Huntington, 
W. Va,, outlined In two sessions the responsibilities of a toxfboat master under 
modern conditions in the towing industry, 

A St, Louis attorney, Milton Goldstein, discussed employe rights under 
admiralty law, R.H. Stith, St, Louis, secretary of the Inland Waterways Health 
and Safety Association, handled a session dealing with the master's responsibilities 
for sick and injured crew members, and William A, McCormick, Jr., Pittsburgh, Union 
Barge Lines safety director, emphasized the importance of preventing accidents and 
gave pointers on maintaining safety at the dock and on the tow. 

Of high interest to the men was an impartial discussion on labor relations by 
Dr, Fred Witney, Indiana University authority on the subject. Short course 
participants entered heartily into the discussion. 

Vital to day-to-day towboat operations were reports on new techniques and 
equipment: in the comprehension and limitations of radar by Charles E, Moore, RCA 
staff engineer of radio marine products, Camden, N.J., and discussions of "rules 
of the road" by Lcdr. Phillip B, Moberg, St, Louis, U.S, Coast Guard legal officer, 

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The group completed Part 1 of the school's two-part program. Twenty-one others 
finished the same program last May. Both groups will be combined for the more 
advanced Part II of the school's course of study. This section has been scheduled 
tentatively for next fall. 

Enrolled in the latest session were: 

Eldon Shannon, Mt. Vernon, Ind,; Cecil Hartsock, Marseilles, 111.; 
John Honeyman, Morning Sun, la.; and James D. Jones, West Chicago, all representing 
A.L. Mechling Barge Lines, Joliet, 111.; M.L. Clausing, New Orleans, and Reese Lloyd, 
Fort Thomas, Ky., of Union Barge Line Corp., Pittsburgh, Pa.; Carl B. Trobaugh, 
Clarksville, Ind., of Kosmos Towing Co., Kosmosdale, Ky.; Amos J. Waddell, 
Materials Handling Co., South Charleston, W. Va,; John Morman, Portsmouth, 0., 
of Triangle Towing Co., Milford, 0.; Wallace Wiseman, Ashland, Ky., of Upper Ohio 
Towing Co., Milford, 0.; Hezza Johnson, Huntington, W, Va., of the Ray Towing Co., 
Cincinnati; Charles Lehman, Webster Grove, Mo., of Inland Towing Co.; and Otto Ball, 
Chesapeake, W.Va. 



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From Bill Lyons 11-9-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone:453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — Five undergraduate chapters of Alpha Delta 
Sigma, national professional advertising fraternity, have been given "Top Chapter" 
ratings by the National Council of the organization, with Southern Illinois 
University's chapter taking second place, Dr. Don Hileman, associate professor 
of journalism and advisor to the chapter, announced today. 

The chapter with the highest rating was the A.B. Penny chapter at the 
University of Houston. SIU's Charles H. Sandage chapter was next, followed by 
chapters at Marquette, Florida State, and the University of Minnesota. 

Hileman said the fraternity will hold its 59th anniversary convention in 
New York City in April, 1963. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11-9-62 



Release: After 3 p.m. 
Saturday, Nov. 10 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Mr. and Mrs. William Kulessa of (318 West H St.) 
Belleville and Mr. and Mrs. Herman Smith Sr. of (201 Terry) Madison were honored 
Saturday (Nov. 10) as "Parents of the Day" at Southern Illinois University's 
12th annual Parents' Day. 

A couple to represent the coeds and another to represent male students are 
selected each year from among parents nominated by the students. The Kulessas' 
daughter, Trudy, and the Smith's son, Herman Jr., are SIU students. 

Marian K. Dean of Collinsville and Wayne P. Comstock of Geneva were 
co-chairmen of the Parents' Day event, which featured the SIU-Ft. Campbell, Ky. 
football game. Other events to honor parents included morning tours and a coffee 
hour with receptions in the student living areas following the game. A dance 
in the University Center at 8 p.m. concluded the event. 

Last year Parents of the Day t*ere Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Jones of Carbondale 
and Mr. and Mrs. Donald Haskins of Marion. The custom started in 1958. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11-9-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — The Spring, 1963 nationwide competition of the 
National Intercollegiate Flying Association will be held at Southern Illinois 
University, it was announced today by John Feece, Elburn, student president of 
the Saluki Flying Club. 

The SIU flying group, represented by Ronald Kelly, Wataga; Feece; Tom Stewart, 
Ewing; James Mohan, Cambria; and Al Goodwin, Harrisburg, participated in last 
weekend's (Nov, 3-4) midwestern meet in Kalamazoo, Mich, Feece was named national 
president and Kelly national secretary during the meet, 

Mohan and Goodwin as a team placed second in the "bomb-drop" event, two drops 
of a two-pound sand bag toward a target area from an altitude of 200 feet, 

Kelly said although definite dates had not been set for the national meet 
here, some 120 schools are expected to be represented. 

The Saluki Flying Club was formed a year ago by Kelly, a junior in management, 
and began with a membership of eight. There are now 32 members, 22 of whom are 
active fliers, Kelly said the group has a Piper Tri-Pacer, and the membership has 
included some experienced pilots, a German glider pilot, a British private pilot, 
Air Force pilots, and a Naval Reserve pilot. 

Advisers for the group are Gene Siebert, manager of the SIU Airport, and 
Dr. J.E. Burnside of Southern's animal industries department and a private pilot. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11-9-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Frank Sehnert, community consultant for 
Southern Illinois University's department of community development, has been 
named vice chairman of the community development section of the Adult Education 
Association, it was announced today. 

Sehnert said the organization is in the process of compiling a comprehensive 
directory which "should give an indication of the extent community development 
instruction is used in the United States." 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11-9-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — The secretary to the dean of a new liberal arts 
unit at Thammasart University in Bangkok, Thailand, will visit Southern Illinois 
University for five days starting Sunday (Nov, 11) for a look at SIU's student 
services and international programs. 

M.R. Akin Rabibhadana, a 29-year old Oxford University law graduate, is 
responsible for organizing a student counseling program in the new College of 
Liberal Arts at Thainmasart. He is touring U.S. campuses, government and educational 
agencies under the State Department's foreign specialists program of the Office 
of Cultural Exchange, 

Robert Abbey, program officer for the American Council on Education which 
has arranged Akin's tour, called SIU "a particularly approporiate and important 
instutition for Mr, Akin to visit in view of its highly regarded student services 
and its international orientation," 

I. Clark Davis, director of student affairs, and Robert Jacobs, coordinator 
of international programs at SIU, will be Akin's hosts. Thai student Nonpala 
Prasert has been named "assistant host" for the visit. 



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No. 451 November 10, 1962 

S. I. E. A. "NEW SLITTER 

——>——— i i n i i i i — i— i— — 

RICHARD EUGENE BEL L. 33, son of Editor and Mrs. Richard C. Bell, WHITE HALL REGISTER- 
REPUBLICAN, was killed instantly in a highway accident, Oct. 31, a short distance 
from his home in Paxton. Survivors include his wife and four children. • .He had 
worked with his father at the REGISTER- REPUBLICAN until January, 1959, when he 
accepted a position with the Stevens Printing Co. in Paxton. 

MR. AND MRS. BOB MAFFITT are parents of a 7-pound son, Robert Joseph, bom Oct. 26 at 
Lancaster, Pa. Bob formerly was wire editor of the CENTRALIA SENTINEL and now is on 
the copy desk at the LANCASTER, PA. JOURNAL. 

JOE DROMGOOLE . assistant editor, retired last week from the staff of the ALTON EVENING 
TELEGRAPH after almost 44 years with the paper. . .During his long tenure, he served as 
sports editor, wire editor, and city editor, often filling more than one capacity on 
a small staff in his early years as a newsman. . .Succeeding Joe as chief executive in 
the TELEGRAPH news room will be John Focht, who will advance from his wire editor's 
post and will have the title of news editor... John is a graduate of the U. of I. 
School of Journalism. He previously served as sports editor and general assignment 
reporter. 

CHARLIE COX . SIU Edwardsville, writes: "Joe Dromgoole was guest speaker at the Alton 
Public Relations and Ad Club luncheon the other noon and treated us to a half hour of 
stories and humor relating to newspapering. 

"Joe recalled a classified ad appearing in one or the other of the Hillsboro 
papers some years ago from one of the town's many churches. It went something like 
this: 'Ladies of the church have discarded clothing. Call at the church social rooms 
between the hours of 2:00 and 3:00 p.m. Tuesday. ' 

"Joe remarked that during World War II newspapers often ran enlistment stories 
and advertisements for branches of the service. In one ad the letter *c* got 
substituted for the letter 'd* with the result that readers discovered the government 
wanted girls to enlist in the WAVES so 'soldiers could be relieved for more active 
cuties . ' 

"LISTING the number of hands a news story goes through from the time it arrives 
at the newspaper office until it appears in print, Joe said, 'The amazing thing about 
newspapers is not that they make so many mistakes, but that they make so few.' 

"He recalled another occasion many years ago when the editor of a no longer 
publishing central Illinois weekly got the urge to do things like his city cousins. 
Not nearly so well equipped as they, and being in a small community where news travels 
faster than crab grass in a new lawn, he hit upon the idea of posting bulletins in his 
office window when one of the local dignitaries became ill. The first bulletin posted 
at 12 noon read: 'Judge Sherman seriously ill. Word of the judge's illness spread 
quickly and before long a crowd of townspeople had gathered in front of the news 
office to await further bulletins. At 12:30 another one went up: 'Judge Sherman 
sinking fast.' The crowd pressed closer when at 1:00 a third penciled bulletin went 
into the window: 'Judge Sherman on way to heaven. ' There was no bulletin at 1:30, 
and by 2:00 some of the crowd had begun to move down the street in the direction of 
the pool hall. When at 2:30 there was still no new bulletin posted, an old citizen 
of the street, Shockum Long, pushed through what little crowd remained at the window, 
took up the heavy black marking pencil and wrote: 'Great consternation in heaven; 
Judge Sherman not arrived yet.' 

"Can you change my Newsl. mailing address from 930 Holyoake, Edwardsville, to 
675 Notre Dame Avenue, Edwardsville?" (Charlie: We can. Shall we?... Thanhs for the 
letter. Wish we could have heard Joe's talk.) 

Compiled by Information Service, Southern Illinois University, for the Southern 
Illinois Editorial Association, the News litter is made possible because of the extent 
to which area editors include Information Service on their mailing lists, (more) 



Page 2 

CHARLIE BLANC HARD . GILLESPIE MEWS, bad an excellent feature with pix on conversion of 
local phones to dial service, including long distance dialing. • .We think Katie 
Blanchard"e lipped" in one paragraph of her clever column vzhich mixes downtown news 
and advertising. She writes: "Speaking of lighting, after about ten years of mother 
pleading with me to order Christmas Decorations for the plant and home, I finally 
remembered to do it" .. .Remember Charlie's editorials about trading in Gillespie, 
Katie? Or did you order the stuff from a local merchant? •• .There will be a letter! 

ACCORDING TO the MARION DAILY REPUBLICAN, it was the first newspaper in southern 
Illinois to print the story on Eisenhower's speech Saturday at Williamson County Air- 
port. With four persons reporting and two taking pictures for this paper, the 
Republican was being circulated shortly after the crowd had returned from the airport. 

THE MONROE'S , COLLINSVILLE HERALD, carried eight lucrative pages of a fall fashions 
section on pink, we think—or maybe "autumn brown"— paper... And this head on page 
1: "Glen Sewer Wins 4 to 1"... Meaning, of course, that establishment of a sanitary 
sewer district was approved... Dave Felts, Lindsay-Schaub chain brain who has been 
on vacation again, including Las Vegas gambling dens, tells of the young vxjman who 
thought the Bey of Tunis was a typographical error, 

FRED NAETER. publisher and co-founder of the SOUTHEAST MISSOURIAN, was pictured in the 
POST-DISPATCH along with a fellow named Truman. . .Fred is still hopping about at the 
ripe age of 88...SIEA-ers will recall various occasi6ns when he hosted the whole 
durn association down at "Cape." 

BOISTEROUS BILL Boyne, EVENING JOURNAL, East St. Louis, writes to "Cap" Frazer: "Thanks 
for your thoughtfulness in sending me the pictures of my daughter. She was very 
appreciative also. My kids always complain that I never let pictures of them get in 
the paper— but this one slipped by when I wasn't on the desk. And of course I wasn't 
too unhappy anyway. 

"I hope you have enough patience and understanding to work with Bill Lyons. Must 
be a frightful experience. Tell him I said hello..., " (That was right decent of him 
to speak •) 

H ARRY PORTER , HARDIN COUNTY INDEPENDENT, recently back from a "fair" fishing '.. 
trip to Reel Foot Lake, says: "Strangely enough both Memphis newspapers showed no 
partiality toward Governor Ross Barnett and the rioters at the University of Mississippi 
and at Oxford. "Both editorially stated that Governor Barnett was playing politics 
by his actions to further his chances to be elected U.S. Senator from Mississippi two 
years from now. And both predicted that if elected, he would not be seated by the 
Senate— and both had very little use for the rioters— calling them bully boys that 
bloodied defenseless negroes 'heads, and set fire to jeeps of the national guards, 
knowing that the guards had orders not to shoot but to get through to the University* 
So if anyone believes that Governor Barnett has the backing of the whole South— let 
him think twice, for the newspapers of Tennessee came out unequivocally for law and 
order, and condemned Governor Barnett for bringing disgrace to the South." 

NOLAND SEIL . GRAYVILLE MERCURY INDEPENDENT asks: "What do visitors in Grayville 
remember after they leave the city? And what do motorists who must drive through on 
the state highway remember? Are either impressed with what they saw? Do they believe 
Grayville is a thriving town?" 

ED AKERS of the RANDOLPH COUNTY NEWSPAPERS was thanked recently by Robert Dale Sprengel 
for the help given while Boy Scout Sprengel worked on his Journalism merit badge. 
Wonder how many other area eds are helping Scouts with projects like this? The help 
you give now may result in a reporter or a printer ten years from now. •• .Gordon and 
Charlotte Issac of the P ATOKA REGISTER had a hard time finding space for the paper's 
masthead in the Oct. 12 issue. So many political ads, plus the general election 
notice, that they just managed to squeeze it in,.. the only non-ad on pages 2 and 3. 

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Page 3 

IF YOU should run short of funds during your winter vacation in Florida, remember 
that the Joe Wrights still live at 17 Over River, Ft. Myers. Had a letter from Joe 
today. Wo words in it, just clips of whopping big fish caught by OTHER PEOPLE while 
Joe was playing golf. 

ROSES TO TQM PHILLIPS , whose promotion from reporter to news editor of the Pauschert 
"chain" of three papers was announced Nov. 1. Tom joined the PANA NEWS-PALLADIUM 
when he emerged from the Navy about seven years ago. Since then he has acquired a 
wife, two children and the confidence of his boss— in addition to winning photography 
prizes... In announcing Tom's promotion— a gem of a story because it had all the 
earmarks of a well-structured publicity handout— old Mr. Pauschert observed, "In no 
respect am I abdicating complete management and authority, but this promotion (1) 
gives me opportunity to recognize devoted, faithful and able service and (2) releases 
more minutes daily to the increasingly necessary close supervision of all aspects of 
a growing operation. " 

KEN MOLLMAN . MILLSTADT ENTERPRISE: "If you are starting a museum of printing equipmen 
rarities we have a couple of spool cabinets which we might show, at great sacrifice, 
because one of them contains worn and broken linotype parts which, you never know, 
you might need some day; and the other has a couple of fonts of German wood type in ii 
But we do have a priceless antique— a nickle plated shooting stick. Shooting sticks 
may be fairly common, but this one is nickle plated. Then there is a four- foot woodei 
composing stick hanging on the wall. 

"Nice seeing you at Springfield." (Mighty glad you could be there too, Ken, 
since you were president. • .Thing we enjoyed most was lolling in the presidential suit 
in the presence of the presidents both of the IPA and the S ISA... What a thing to be 
able to tell the grandchildren! •• .What are "shooting sticks"— with or without nickle 
plating? .. .That four foot stick must be for wooden second coming type.) 

EARL WOOD was much pleased, no doubt, with this 2-col. boxed message from FLORA 
DAILY NEWS-RECORD employees: "...Today, our boss of many, many years— too many to 
count— becomes ONE OF US; an employe and ONLY AN EMPLOYE. No more do we have to take 
orders from the boss- turned- employe; in fact, we may give him a few. We are speaking 
of course, of 6. Earl Wood, who, today, gathered up his 'whips, prods and other 
instruments of torture,' and fell back into the ranks of the workers •• .Despite his 
'Simon Legree' attitude, however, we'd rather have him back in his old familiar place 
at the helm. Today— perhaps for the first time, but, at least more fully than ever 
before— we realize how kind and fair you were as a boss, Earl; we love you, and 
appreciate you. Wherever you go and whatever you do, our affection and good wishes 
go with you." 

BLUE CROSS means insurance to some people but to readers of Clyde R. Cole's 
GREENFIELD ARGUS it means prompt action needed. A BLUE CROSS on a copy of the ARGUS 
means your subscription has expired. A RED CROSS is the real danger signal. That 
means this is your LAST PAPER. 

A. E. VANDSVER of the FREE PRESS -PROGRESS (Nokomis-Ohlman-WitfCoalton Wenonah 
communities) is full of bright and pertinent thrusts of the pen in his column "The 
Hobby" Sample: "Are we as prosperous as J. F. K. would have us think? No sir. We 
are a long way from being highly prosperous. There are still a number of families 
who not only don't have a second car, but they don't even own a boat. "... Also, "A 
committee of five consists of one who does the work and four others who pat him on th 
back.".. .In the same issue, Walter Winchell FRICKE says, "A pessimist is a woman who 
thinks she'll be unable to fit her car into a certain space. An optimist is a man 
who thinks she won't try." ...Kathleen McNew, editor of the CARRIER MILLS' version of 
the HARRIS BURG REGISTER, has a good feature about Frank Greenwood, 90-year old Black 
Creek, Wis., editor who, like most editors, attributes his long life and good health 
to the fact that he doesn't cuss, smoke, chew or drink anything harder than milk and 
can march a mile in a parade without fatigue .. .Kathleen got her information from a 
reader who corresponds with brother Greenwood. (more) 



Page A 

with St. Louis SDX-ere 
SDX representatives of U. of Missouri, U. of I. and SIU met/ Nov. 1 at the St. Louis 
Press Club, with Pres. Tom Richter moderator of a panel which included: Charles 
Pendergast, editorial writer for P-D, Mortin Duggan, news editor of the GLOBE, Steve 
Rowan, assistant director of special events at KMOX, and Horace Barks, pres. of 
Horace Barks Publications (a business periodical) •• .Richter spoke highly of SIU grad 
Ron Jacober, who is associated with "Tom's Auto Club of Mo. ".. .Principal question was, 
"How can a budding journalist best prepare himself for a successful future? "•• .Also, 
whether an individual should seek a position in his best field (news writing, sports, 
desk) or seek a spot on a small paper where he would be apt to pick up broader 
training .. .Pendergast: "NO newspaper job is so tough that a person cannot handle it. 
••If you get a chance for a job, take it regardless of what department it is in"... 
Duggan, however, was of the opinion that a student should be directed by instructors 
regarding what goal he should have, depending on the individual's talents.. .As usual, 
no definite decision was reached, 

DURING social session Wm. A. Daugherty, asst. to chief copy ed. at Post-D., came 
up with the best quip while discussing lightly the shortcomings of today's college 
graduates and worries they cause his dept. Said he, "It seems as if something must 
have happened to our public school system about 15 years ago because few products show 
signs of having ever learned how to spell. • .One thing we have noticed, however, is 
that they all seem to misspell words in the same manner, just as if they all learned 
out of the same wrong book".. .Guest speaker was Tom Eagleton, Missouri's attorney 
general, youngest in the U.S. ..He spoke on the prayer decision handed down by Supreme 
Court and was of the opinion that the entire affair was handled inaccurately by news- 
papers and wire services and that public opinion was uniformly inaccurate due to press 
stories. He predicted courts will be in the public eye more in the future. ..He 
observed, "Any reporter owes it to himself to do some homework before covering any 
court decision," Justice Black's 21st footnote was completely overlooked by everyone, 
and it was the key to the court's ruling. Eagleton thought the Court made a mistake 
in taking for granted that its opinion would be accurately reported. For these notes, 
thanks to Fred Huff, SIU sports writer, who was the guest of Harold Tuthill of P-D 
sports • 

CARL L. STANTON . WOOD RIVER JOURNAL, has an excellent feature on a family from Holland 
living here for the year while the father serves as an exchange engineer with the 
Shell Oil Company. . .The JOURNAL Includes three high school newspaper sections. ..A 
recent JOURNAL picture showed civic and business leaders spending a morning coffee 
hour with the district's new school teachers. 

JOAN SIEMER . TEUTOPOLIS PRESS: "We understandably cheered, cheered, for Old Notre 
Dame as it completed another successful T.V. season last Saturday by edging Oklahoma. 
More impressive than the football skill either of the famous amateur professional 
players' groups displayed, however, were the too candid introductory close-ups of the 
cast. Camera angle and proximity blended monstrous shoulder pads, Frankenstein flat- 
tops, and night shaded eyes into startling mirages of things Neanderthal stalking out 
of pre-history into the living room; so much that when several Notre Darners smiled 
sinisterly through gaping voids where teeth or reasonable fascimilies should be the 
hallucination was completed to the delusion that Alma Mater had time- travelled behind 
the days of Joe Savoldi and was subsidizing real primitives. We wish they had kept 
their big mouths shut." 

THE NEW ATHENS ' Fischers gave a college drum beater the lead story in the DUPO HERALD 
TRIBUNE, one of their many papers. Oddly enough, the fellow's mother lives in Dupo. 
...A good feature in the EVANS VILLE, INDIANA COURIER goes back to when the paper was a 
hand-set weekly in 1845... Tim Turner, HARRISBURG REGISTER, is so hard up for column 
material that he has resorted to writing about black walnuts with double shells. 
"Nuts", says Tim... The CARLINVILLE DEMOCRAT invites readers to buy classifieds at 20 
cents per line for each insertion, with a 60 cent minimum... Bob Kern, BELLEVILLE NEWS 
DEMOCRAT: "If a really large number of young people believe they can easily pull the 
wool over their elders' eyes, it speaks all too eloquently of the sad gap which may 
exist in understanding between generations." (more) 



Page 5 

BEIATED«- ROSSS to Roy "Rambler" Rucker, BRIDGEPORT LEADER, who finally outscored his 
column-writing mate by being elected treasurer of the Illinois Press Association. •• 
Just let her try to top that one, Roy.,. We 1 11 even bet that she is proud of the 
"old man", 

MERLE JONES . SOUTHERN ILLINOISAN sports ed., has returned to the grind following a 
two-weeks 1 layoff, the result of an auto accident •••Tom Coulson, editor of O.J. Lere's 
LEROY JOURNAL, shared a page 1, 2-col. pix with the IPA plaque awarded the JOURNAL 
for "best editorial page" for papers with circulation under 3, 500.. .Evidently the 
PETERSBURG OBSERVER Shaws have joined the growing ranks of newsmen whose interest in 
fishing is on the rise. They gave four columns to a pix of State Department of 
Conservation men checking on the size of bass with which Lake Petersburg was stocked 
last spring. 

ROSES to Dave Saunders, CARTERVILLE HERALD, who became a member of SDX Wednesday 
evening. • .The HERALD recently has carried divergent views of Publisher Paul Simon 
and Editor Saunders •• .In one issue, Paul took Dave to task for some strong statements 
on a controversial area recreational question. • .Last week each of the newsmen 
endorsed opposing candidates. The HERALD'S community calendar is sponsored by a 
furniture store. • .Bailey Williams is a member of the SIU Community Development staff. 
..His daughter, Cyndy, a high school student, writes a good HERALD column which has 
been named "Cyndy 1 s Corner". • .In the "Corner" last week was an admonition to have 
fun but not destructive fun on Hallowe'en. . .Thought we could detect Bailey's fine . 
hand in that paragraph. 

HENRY NEWS REPUBLICAN ; "Ken Lanier, linotype operator at the HENRY NEWS-REPUBLICAN, 
and his family, have just adopted a young possum after finding it as a wounded waif 
in Henry's Central park.". . .The Henry Sweeper carried an unusual pix showing a 
recently-painted wall of the women's rest in the Henry municipal building— ALREADY 
COVERED WITH "CHRISTINE AND LARRY", "BETTY AND JAY" and so on... If you've wondered 
what on earth you could do to discourage that sort of vandalism in your town, use 
your camera. ILLMQKY AD CLUB DINNER, 7 p.m., Nov. 16, Idan-Ha Hotel, Cape Girardeau.. 
Topic: "Budgeting" Ladies welcome. For reservations write Don Hileman, SIU Journ.Dept 
FICTION by Tom Hillsboro Bliss, the penniless pauper who holds paid-up membership on 
the board of directors of a prosperous bank: "If you are like me and lack about 
$300 of having a dime, you'll wonder where the customers of Hillsboro National Bank 
cabbage onto all the cash they have stored in the sock there. ..Assets, as of the 
Sept. 23 call date, were $12,389,113.03, the largest in the bank's history. How 
much of the $12,389,118.00 is yours I do not know, but the 3c on the end is mine." 

HOWE MORGAN , who allows it is okay to use a codfish skin instead of an egg to settle 
coffee grounds— and who not only remembers spool cabinets but also when every kitchen 
had a coffee grinder, says, "It is to be regretted that a sheriff cannot succeed him* 
self in Illinois. Randolph County has had several fine sheriffs in recent years, and 
if a sheriff has done a good job, he should be able to run again on his record."... 
Also, "Sales tax returns show that Sparta is way out in front in the retail sale of 
furniture each month. There's a reason. Local furniture stores handle a wide range 
of merchandise and they do a lot of advertising. That combination never fails. 1 ... 
Hope you read where five newspaper managers were fined $2.25 each for raising ad rates 
without government approval— in Indonesia. 

WHEN TOM LEE t MARISSA MESSENGER, pictured a young man displaying a 3% pound bass 
snagged on his first fishing trip, Tom referred to the finny fighter as a "bassoon"— 
which seemed rather undignified .. .It's too bad that kid was successful at the start. 
Tom wouldn't tell him, but the boy might as well know, some of the days ahead will be 
dark, dreary and fishless... There's some good in everything, even golf. An outdoor 
magazine tells of a boatless fisherman who, when he wants to send his lure far out 
into the deep, attaches a golf ball to the line, whacks the ball with a driver and 
the ball carries the lure to its proper destination... Never before have we known of a 
golfer capable of bringing home to the lijjtte woman a nice string of fish for her to 



- ' 



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> 



The Corbondale Rotation 

irbondale Rotary Club Meets Every Wednesday Noon at the Elks Club 

Charter Club No. 743 - May I, 1920 

Vol. 5 No, 19 November 10, 1962 

POSTMORTEMS WERE IN ORDER last Wednesday as Carbondale Rotarians rehashed the election 
returns. There were some "X told you sos", and even more admissions of surprise at 
the outcome. Charlie Feirich was beaming over the outcome of the Judicial Amendment, 
for which he has worked so long. Prexy Tom waxed philisophical over the trials and 
tribulations of an election judge. Tom looked surprisingly peppy in spite of a 30- 
hour stint at the polls which ended at 7 a.m. last Wednesday. Ye editor's own 
observation is that the voters obviously want younger men in office, in view of the 
number of oldsters turned out to pasture in this year's election. Attendance was 
down last week, attributed undoubtedly to the number of members who sat up too late 
watching the returns. 

A FINE ROTARY PROGRAM was heard by those who were on hand. David Lauerman, this 
year's fellowship winner, now a graduate student at 8IU, gave us an inspiring talk 
on the Rotary Fellowships, the Tokyo convention and his views on the value of the 
Foundation program. He leaves in March to attend Victoria University in Wellington, 
New Zealand. This is Rotary Foundation Month, as Frank Klingberg reminded t us and we 
need to improve on our own excellent record which now stands at 150 per cent. Why 
not set our sights on becoming a 200 per cent club this year? 

NEXT WEEK Program Chairman for the Month Ralph Gallington has another treat in store 
when we will salute National Education Week. Our speaker will be SIU's visiting 
professor George S. Counts, who has had a first hand glimpse of Soviet educational 
methods. There has been a lot of discussion in recent years as to whether the 
Russians are doing better than we are in turning out scientists and our speaker can 
be expected to give us the answer— straight from the Kremlin's mouth. His subject 
is: "What Can We Learn From Soviet Education?" Don't miss this one. 

WITH THIS ISSUE an old editor takes over temporarily for C, A. Cap Frazer. First of 
all he wants to point out that in his absence the Carbondale Rotarian improved 
greatly and he will be hard put to live up to the reputation that our news letter 
has acquired in his sojourn abroad. We certainly cannot promise that it will be more 
scholarly but we shall do our best to give you "all the news that is fit to print". 

TT TS T.AT17.P THAM VHTT THTNK C!r»1 . Mar rAmlndofl nfi fhaf the Christmas season is raoidlv 



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• 



. 



1 • 



The Carbondale Rotarian 

, r bondale Rotary Club Meets Every Wednesday Noon at the Elks Club 

Charter Club No. 743 - May I, 1920 

Vol. 5 No. 19 November 10, 1962 

POSTMORTEMS HERE IN ORDER last Wednesday as Carbondale Rotarians rehashed the election 
returns. There were some "I told you sos", and even more admissions of surprise at 
the outcome. Charlie Feirich was beaming over the outcome of the Judicial Amendment, 
for which he has worked so long. Prexy Tom waxed phillsophical over the trials and 
tribulations of an election judge. Tom looked surprisingly peppy in spite of a 30- 
hour stint at the polls which ended at 7 a.m. last Wednesday. Ye editor's own 
observation is that the voters obviously want younger men in office, in view of the 
number of oldsters turned out to pasture in this year's election. Attendance was 
down last week, attributed undoubtedly to the number of members who sat up too late 
watching the returns. 

A FINE ROTARY PROGRAM was heard by those who were on hand. David Lauerman, this 
year's fellowship winner, now a graduate student at SIU, gave us an inspiring talk 
on the Rotary Fellowships, the Tokyo convention and his views on the value of the 
Foundation program. He leaves in March to attend Victoria University in Wellington, 
New Zealand, This is Rotary Foundation Month, as Frank Klingberg reminded, us and we 
need to improve on our own excellent record which now stands at 150 per cent. Why 
not set our sights on becoming a 200 per cent club this year? 

NEXT WEEK Program Chairman for the Month Ralph Gallington has another treat in store 
when we will salute National Education Week. Our speaker will be SIU's visiting 
professor George S. Counts, who has had a first hand glimpse of Soviet educational 
methods. There has been a lot of discussion in recent years as to whether the 
Russians are doing better than we are in turning out scientists and our speaker can 
be expected to give us the answer— straight from the Kremlin's mouth. His subject 
is: "What Can We Learn From Soviet Education?" Don't miss this one. 

WITH THIS ISSUE an old editor takes over temporarily for C. A. Cap Frazer. First of 
all he wants to point out that in his absence the Carbondale Rotarian improved 
greatly and he will be hard put to live up to the reputation that our news letter 
has acquired in his sojourn abroad. We certainly cannot promise that it will be more 
scholarly but we shall do our best to give you "all the news that is fit to print", 

IT IS LATER THAN YOU THINK Col. Mac reminded us that the Christmas season is rapidly 
approaching by reporting that his committee is putting into shape the plans for a 
bigger and better Christmas party. The clubs of Herrin and Murphysboro will join 
with us for this big event and there will be a fine program provided by foreign 
students at SIU. Appropriately, the club will give as a Christmas memento to our 
foreign guests copies of Rotary 's "Seven Paths to Peace." 

HANDS ACROSS THE SEA An impressive reminder of Rotary's international fellowship 
was received last week from the Rotary Club of Colombo in Ceylon. Those who studied 
geography before World War II will probably need to go to the atlas to see exactly 
where it was that our own Carl Wiegand attended a Rotary meeting on August 30. The 
letter telling of his visit obviously made its way to Carbondale by sea mail, but we 
think it is a good example of Rotary Fellowship. The letter pointed out that "such 
visits help greatly to strengthen the bonds of friendship and fellowship that bind 
Rotary clubs in an international program of fellowship and understanding." 

YOU GET FROM ROTARY as much as you put into your membership in Rotary. We might 
Illustrate this truism by a Chinese story. A rice farmer in Formosa went to Taipei 
for the first time. He was impressed by all he saw in the big city and he wanted to 
take home a present to his wife. He saw his first mirror and brought it back to his 
home and presented it to his wife who of course had never seen a mirror. She 
immediately became indignant after looking into it and accused him of acquiring a 
No. 2 wife in the big city. She also complained to her mother-in-law, who demanded 
to see it and after studying It summoned her son. "My son," she said, "I can under- 
stand you wanting a No. 2 wife, but why in the world did you not select a young and 
pretty one!" 

HOTED IN PASSING Bob Vokac visited in Boston last week, R. C. Joseph had as his 
guest Wednesday bis son. Bill Joseph. John Mare filled in for secretary Jim 
Mowry last week. 



Service OfLve Self - 3te (Profit Mod QYL Serves JSed 



CARBONDALE ROTARY CLUB — 1962-63 



VICE-PRESIDENT 

Max Sappenfield 



GOVERNOR DIST. 651 PRESIDENT 

Norman Beck Tom Easterly 

DIRECTORS: Frank Gumm, Ken Miller, Max Sappenfield, Bob Vokac 
PAST DISTRICT GOVERNOR: Lester Webb PAST PRESIDENT: Harry Goldstein 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 
•Jim Mowry 



COMMITTEES 



CLUB SERVICE 

Max Sappenfield, Director 
ATTENDANCE 

Bryan Kimmel, Chairman 
CLASSIFICATION 

Carl Birkholz, Chairman 
CLUB BULLETIN 

Bill Lyons, Chairman 
FELLOWSHIP - 
SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 

John Q. Clark, Chairman 
MAGAZINE - 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Roye Bryant, Chairman 
MEMBERSHIP 

Clyde Winkler, Chairman 
PROGRAM 

Max Sappenfield, Chairman 
AUDITING 

W. B. Crane, Jr., Chairman 
MUSIC 

George Hand, Chairman 
LEGISLATION 

Herb Settle, Chairman 
HISTORY 

John Allen, Chairman 
■ 



Name Nickname 

Abbott, Talbert W. (Abbott) 
Adams, George W. (George) 
Armstrong, John M. (John) 
Birkholz, Carl K. (Carl) 
Bryant, Roye R. (Roye) 
Budslick, William (Bill) I 
Bushee, Ralph W. (Ralph) 
Campisi, Paul J. (Paul) 
Clark, John Q. (John) 
Clayton, Charles C. (Charley) 
Crane, William B., Jr. (Bill) 
Crocker, D. R. (Don) 
Curtis, Harry C. (Harry) 
Easterly, Thomas A. (Tom) 
Eddings, W. L. (Tinner) 
Feirich, Charles E. (Charley) 
Fisher, Harvey I. (Harvey) 
Frazer, C. A. (C.A.) 
Gallington, Ralph O. (Ralph) 
Goldstein, Harry S. (Golde) 
Gray, Ralph (Ralph) 
Gumm, Frank L. (Frank) 
Hamblen, John W. (John) 
Hand, George H. (George), 
Hoffman, Paul M. (Paul) 
Hosley, Neil W. (Neil) 
Joseph, R. C. (Joe) 
Keith, Malcolm Robert (Bob) 
Kimmel, Bryan (Bryan) 
Kimmel, Philip (Phip) 
Klingberg, Frank L. (Frank) 
Koonce, Harry (Harry) 
Lee, W. D. (Doug) 
I.on P . HownrH R mi 



VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

Frank Gumm, Director 
BUYER-SELLER- 
COMPETITOR-RELATIONS 

Henry J. Rehn, Chairman 
EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE 
RELATIONS 

Curt Mann, Chairman 
FOUR WAY TEST & 
COMMUNITY 
GOVERNMENT 

Mason Parker, Chairman 
OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Neil Hosley, Chairman 



COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Kenneth Miller, Director 
YOUTH 

Paul Hoffman, Chairman 
COMMUNITY SAFETY 

James Wallace, Chairman 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Don Crocker, Chairman 
SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS & 
STUDENT LOANS 

Frank Klingberg* Chairman 
STUDENT GUESTS . 

Chuck Southard, Chairman 
INTER-SERVICE 
CLUB MEETINGS 

A. R. MacMillan, Chairman 



INTERNATIONAL SERVICI 

Robert Vokac, Director 
INTERNATIONAL 
CONTACTS 

Howard Long, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Paul Campisi, Chairman 
ROTARY FOUNDATION 

Wilis Swartz, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
STUDENT PROJECTS 

Ralph Bushee, Chairman 



ROSTER 






Membership or Classification 

Senior Active 

Edu. — History 

Gas & Oil Wholesaling 

Art Goods — Retailing 

Senior Active 

Motor Courts 

Edu. — Library 

Edu. — Sociology 

Edu. — High School Principal 

Edu. — Journal Publishing 

Accounting Service 

Christianity — Prostestantism 

Senior Active 

Decorating materials — Retailing 

Heating Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Zoology 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Industrial Education 

Men's Furnishings — Retailing 

Real Estate Agency 

Associations — YMCA Director 

Edu. — Computing Service 

Senior Active . 

Edu. — Marketing 

Edu. — Forestry 

R.R. Transp. — Dispatching 

Plastics — Mfg. 

Petroleum — Production 

Taxi Service 

Edu. — Government 

R.R. Transp. — Div. Supt. 

Television — Service 



Name Nickname 

Mann, Curt F. (Ciirt) 
Mars, John T. (John) 
McKeefery, William J. (BUI) 
McRoy, Paul F. (Paul) 
Miller, Kenneth R. (Ken) 
Mowry, James B. (Jim) 
Murray, Glen H. (Glen) 
Murrie, B. J. (B.J.) 
Nagel, William E. (Bill) 
Neunlist, Dempsey V. (D.V.) 
Parker, H. M. (Mason) 
Parrish, Carl A. (Cap) 
Parrish, Gordon A. (Gordon) 
Pulley, Charles (Charles) 
Rehn, Henry J. (Henry) 
Renfro, Louis F. (L.F.) 
Sappenfield, Max M. (Max) 
Sederlin, Elvin L. (E.L.) 
Semar, Preston 
Settle, Herbert B. (Herb) 
Southard, Charles (Chuck) 
Stafford, Eugene (Gene) 
Swartz, Willis G. (Bill) 
Swick, Ralph D. (Ralph) 
Veath, Irose J. (I. J.) 
Vokac, Robert B. (Bob) 
Wiegand, G. Carl (Carl) 
Winkler, Clyde V. (Clyde) 
Allen, John W. (John) 
Davis, Robert W., (Bob) 
Dill, John D. (John) 
Hodge, John R. (John) 
Jordon, Roy V. (Roy) 



Membership or Classification 

Men's Clothing — Retailing 

Banking — Savings 

Edu. — Admin. Acad. Affai 

Broadcasting Services 

Edu. — University Admin. 

Horticulture — Research 

House Furniture — Retailing 

Building Construction 

Edu. — Tech. Adult Edu. 

Comercial Photography 

Elec. Light & Power Service 

Insurance — Life 

Milk — Distributing 

Edu." — Architectural Service 

Edu. — School of Business 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Government 

Public Health 

Loans — Auto Financing 

Highway Eng. Utilities 

Edu. — Student Counseling 

Ins. — Health and Hospital 

Senior Active 

Edu, — Accounting 

Sporting Goods — Retailing 

Edu. — Placements 

Edu. — Economics^ 

Past Service 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 



From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



£ 



/ 



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u 



11 - 10 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



SXU NEWS SUMMARY 
FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION 



A Southern Illinois University alumnus — Thomas I. Brown of Oak Park — is 
en route to the South Pole where he will become one of those rare individuals who 
has visited both poles. Brown will live at the Couth Pole a year while doing 
ozone studies for the U.S. Weather Bureau. He visited the other end of the earth 
when he was with the U.S. Weather Bureau in 1957-50. At the South Pole, he says, 
he'll live under the snow, in a facility comprised of nine inner-connecting tunnels, 
in which he will spend 90 per cent of his time. Along with him facing those severe 
arctic conditions: 11 scientists, 21 Navy personnel. Among the problems he'll face: 
ro mail from February to October... winds which may reach 80 to 90 knots per hour... 
temperatures ranging from zero to 05 below, 

* * * * 

An Ethiopian industrial education specialist - Johanes Wolds Selassie - is 
back in Washington, D,C. after a two-weeks' observation of agricultural engineering 
and vocational agriculture education practices and facilities at S-I-U. He'll 
return to Ethiopia November 29th where he expects to teach in an industrial-technical 
school, 

* * * * 

The secretary to the dean of a new Bangkok, Thailand liberal arts university 
is visiting Southern for five days. He arrived Sunday (Nov. 11) for a look at 
SIU's student services and international programs. 

* * * * 

Thirteen towboat masters from eight states are back on the jobs after 
collecting new ideas in a special five-day school at Southern Illinois University 
(Nov, 5-9). Known as a "School for Towboat Masters," the short courses has been 
developed as an educational program to enrich the professional know-how of 



experienced men in the barge and towing industry. 

* * * * 



CARBONDALE ROTARY CLUB — 1962-63 



GOVERNOR DIST. 651 PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Norman Beck Tom Easterly Max Sappenfield 

DIRECTORS: Frank Gumm, Ken Miller, Max Sappenfield, Bob Vokac 

PAST DISTRICT GOVERNOR: Lester Webb PAST PRESIDENT: Harry Goldstein 

COMMITTEES 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 
•Jim Mowry 



CLUB SERVICE 

Max Sappenfield, Director 
ATTENDANCE 

Bryan Kimmel, Chairman 
CLASSIFICATION 

Carl Birkholz, Chairman 
CLUB BULLETIN 

Bill Lyons, Chairman 
FELLOWSHIP - 
SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 

John Q. Clark, Chairman 
MAGAZINE - 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Roye Bryant, Chairman 
MEMBERSHIP 

Clyde Winkler, Chairman 
PROGRAM 

Max Sappenfield, Chairman 
AUDITING 

W. B. Crane, Jr., Chairman 
MUSIC 

George Hand, Chairman 
LEGISLATION 

Herb Settle, Chairman 
HISTORY 

John Allen, Chairman 



Name Nickname 

Abbott, Talbert W. (Abbott) 
Adams, George W. (George) 
Armstrong, John M. (John) 
Birkholz, Carl K. (Carl) 
Bryant, Roye R. (Roye) 
Budslick, William (Bill) I. 
Bushee, Ralph W. (Ralph) 
Campisi, Paul J. (Paul) 
Clark, John Q. (John) 
Clayton, Charles C. (Chaxlev) 
Crane, William B., Jr. (Bill) 
Crocker, D. R. (Don) 
Curtis, Harry C. (Harry) 
Easterly, Thomas A. (Tom) 
Eddings, W. L. (Tinner) 
Feirich, Charles E. (Charley) 
Fisher, Harvey I. (Harvey) 
Frazer, C. A. (C.A.) 
GaUington, Ralph O, (Ralph) 
Goldstein, Harry S. (Golde) 
Gray, Ralph (Ralph) 
Gumm, Frank L. (Frank) . ' 
Hamblen, John W. (John) 
Hand, George H. (George) 
Hoffman, Paul M. (Paul) 
Hosley, Neil W. (Neil) 
Joseph, R. C. (Joe) , 

Keith, Malcolm Robert (Bob) 
Kimmel, Bryan (Bryan) 
Kimmel, Philip (Phip) 
Klingberg, Frank L. (Frank) 
Koonce, Harry (Harry) 
Lee, W. D. (Doug) 
Long, Howard R. (H.R.) 
Lyons, William H. (Bill) 
MacMillan, Alexander R. (Mac) 



VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

Frank Gumm, Director 
BUYER-SELLER- 
COMPETITOR-RELATIONS 

Henry J. Rehn, Chairman 
EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE 
RELATIONS 

Curt Mann, Chairman 
FOUR WAY TEST & 
COMMUNITY 
GOVERNMENT 

Mason Parker, Chairman 
OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Neil Hosley, Chairman 



COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Kenneth Miller, Director 
YOUTH 

Paul Hoffman, Chairman 
COMMUNITY SAFETY 

James Wallace, Chairman 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Don Crocker, Chairman 
SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS & 
STUDENT LOANS 

Frank Klingberg! Chairman 
STUDENT GUESTS 

Chuck Southard, Chairman 
INTER-SERVICE 
CLUB MEETINGS 

A. R. MacMillan, Chairman 



INTERNATIONAL SERVICE 

Robert Vokac, Director 
INTERNATIONAL 
CONTACTS 

Howard Long, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Paul Campisi, Chairman 
ROTARY FOUNDATION 

Wilis Swartz, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
STUDENT PROJECTS 

Ralph Bushee, Chairman 



ROSTER 



. ... 



- 



Membership or Classification 

Senior Active 

EdU; — History 

Gas & Oil Wholesaling 

Art Goods — Retailing 

Senior Active 

Motor Courts 

Edu. — - Library' 

Edu. — Sociology 

Edu. — High School Principal 

Edu. — Journal Publishing 

Accounting Service 

Christianity — Prostestantism 

Senior Active 

Decorating materials — Retailing 

Heating Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Zoology 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — - Industrial Education 

Men's Furnishings — Retailing 

Real Estate Agency 

Associations — YMCA Director 

Edu. — Computing Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Marketing 

Edu. — Forestry 

R.R. Transp. '— Dispatching 

Plastics — Mfg. 

Petroleum — Production 

Taxi Service 

Edu. — Government 

R.R. Transp. — Div. Supt. 

Television — Service 

Edu. — Journalism 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Transportation 



Name Nickname 

Mann, Curt F. (Curt) 
Mars, John T. (John) 
McKeefery, William J. (Bill) 
McRoy, Paul F. (Paul) 
Miller, Kenneth R. (Ken) 
Mowry, James B. (Jim) 
Murray, Glen H. (Glen) 
Murrie, B. J. (B.J.) 
Nagel, William E. (Bill) 
Neunlist, Dempsey V. (D.V.) 
Parker, H..M. (Mason) 
Parrish, Carl A. (Cap) 
Parrish, Gordon A. (Gordon) 
Pulley, Charles (Charles) 
Rehn, Henry J; (Henry) 
Renfro, Louis F. (L.F.) 
Sappenfield, Max M. (Max) 
Sederlin, Elvin L. (E.L.) 
Semar, Preston 
Settle, Herbert B. (Herb) 
Southard, Charles (Chuck) 
Stafford', Eugene (Gene) 
Swartz, Willis G. (Bill) 
Swick, Ralph D. (Ralph) 
Veath, Irose J. (I. J.) 
Vokac, Robert B. (Bob) 
Wiegand, G. Carl (Carl) 
Winkler, Clyde V. (Clyde) 
Allen, John W. (John) 
Davis, Robert W., (Bob) 
Dill, John D. (John) 
Hodge, John R. (John) . 
Jordon, Roy V. (Roy) 
Lentz, E. G. (Gib) 
Smith, Clyde L. (Clyde) 



Membership or Classification 

Men's Clothing — Retailing 
Banking — Savings 
Edu. — Admin. Acad. Affairs 
Broadcasting Services 
Edu. — University Admin. 
Horticulture — Research 
House Furniture — Retailing 
Building Construction 
Edu. — Tech. Adult Edu. 
Comercial Photography 
Elec. Light' & Power Service 
Insurance. — Life 
Milk — Distributing 
Edu. — Architectural Service 
Edu. — School of Business 
Senior Active 
Edu. — Government 
Public Health 
Loans — Auto Financing 
Highway Eng. Utilities 
Edu, — Student Counseling 
Ins. ' — Health and Hospital 
Senior Active 
Edu, i — Accounting 
Sporting Goods — Retailing 
Edu. — Placements 
Edu. — °- Economics^ 
Past Service 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary ' 
U i i 



AREA ROT AKY MEETINGS — 



.". 



1 II 

Monday Nobn — Cehtrblia; Ha'rrisbuf g ; Hemn, New Athens, O'Fallon ' 

Monday Evening — Cairo, Chester, Cisne, Columbia, Freeburg, Golconda, Mt. Carmel, Olney, Pinckneyville, \V. Salem' ' 

Tuesday Noon — Albion, Belleville, Chicago, Eldorado, Mt. Vernon, Urbana, West Frankfort 

Tuesday Evening — Benton, Cafmi, DuQuoin, Flora, Murphysboro, 'Sparta, Waterloo, Wayne Cfty" '■'' 

Wednesday Noon — Carbondale,. East St. Louis, Johnston City, Lebanon ' ."■ * ' ■ ■ 

Thursday Noon — Anna, Carlyle, Fairfield, Lawrenceville, Marion, Metropolis, St. Louis 
Thursday Evening — Marissa, Mascoutah, Nashville, Zeigler 
Friday Noon — Louisville, Salem 
Friday Evening — Crossville, Millstadt 



From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



£ 



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11 - 10 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



SIU NEWS SUMMARY 
FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION 



A Southern Illinois University alumnus — Thomas I. Brown of Oak Park — is 
en route to the South Pole where he will become one of those rare individuals who 
has visited both poles. Brown will live at the South Pole a year while doing 
ozone studies for the U.S. Weather Bureau. He visited the other end of the earth 
when he was with the U.S. Weather Bureau in 1957-5G. At the South Pole, he says, 
he'll live under the snow, in a facility comprised of nine inner-connecting tunnels, 
in which he will spend 90 per cent of his time. Along with him facing those severe 
arctic conditions: 11 scientists, 21 Navy personnel. Among the problems he'll face: 
ro mail from February to October... winds which may reach 00 to 90 knots per hour... 
temperatures ranging from zero to 05 below, 

* * * * 

An Ethiopian industrial education specialist - Johanes Wolds Selassie - is 
back in Washington, D.C. after a two-weeks' observation of agricultural engineering 
and vocational agriculture education practices and facilities at S-I-U. He'll 
return to Ethiopia November 29th where he expects to teach in an industrial-technica' 
school, 

* * * * 

The secretary to the dean of a new Bangkok, Thailand liberal arts university 
is visiting Southern for five days. He arrived Sunday (Nov. 11) for a look at 
SIU's student services and international programs. 

* * * * 

Thirteen towboat masters from eight states are back on the jobs after 
collecting new ideas in a special five-day school at Southern Illinois University 
(Nov. 5-9). Known as a "School for Towboat Masters," the short courses has been 
developed as an educational program to enrich the professional know-how of 



experienced men in the barge and towing industry. 

* * * * 



• 



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The Spring, 1963 nationwide competition of the National Intercollegiate 
Flying Association will be held at Southern Illinois University, John Feece, 
Elburn, president of the Saluki Flying Club, says he expects 1-hundred 20 schools 
to participate. 

* * * * 

Southern Illinois University students who want summer jobs in 1963 better 
start trying for them right now. That's the word from Charles J, Carlsen, 
assistant supervisor in Southern's Student Work Office, And to give students a 
helping hand in their search for summer work, S-I-U has set up a summer employment 
center in the Student Work Office, Details on jobs at resorts, national parks, 
camps and in industry are available. Last year, more than 5-hundred S-I-U students 
used the summer employment program, and more than 4-hundred resorts, national 
parks and industries channeled job requests through the Student Work Office. 



-Ik- 



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• 







From Bill Lyons 11 - 12 - 62 

SOUTHEiiN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



NOTE LOCAL NAMES 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. -- Southern Illinois University has nominated 15 
seniors for Woodrow Wilson or Danforth Foundation graduate fellowships, David Kenney, 
assistant dean of the Graduate School, said today* 

Nominated on the basis of scholastic achievement, the students will now 
submit additional material to the Wilson and Danforth Foundations. Announcement 
of the nationwide winners of the 1,000 Wilson awards and 100 Danforth grants will 
be made early in 1963. 

Both programs are for students who intend to become college teachers. Last 
year SIU nominated 15 for Wilson grants and one was awarded. There were no 
Danforth nominees. The grants can be used at any fully accredited graduate school 
in the United States. The Wilson grants specify that the recipient can not use 
his grant at the school where he receives his undergraduate degree. Maximum 
financial assistance under either grant is $1,500 for single men and $2,000 for 
married men plus tuition, fees and dependancy allowances. 

Southern Illinois University is limited to five nominees for the Danforth 

grants. There is no limit on Wilson nominees, but Kenney said the University 

tries to nominate only qualified students with a chance to win one of the graduate 

awards . 

The SIU nominees include: Gerald Lawless, (223 East College Ave.) Jacksonville, 
journalism major; Ronnie Hickey, (1205 N. Market) Marion, physics major; 
Patricia Hardy, (102 W. First) Waterloo, Russian major; Nancy Kreftmeyer, (1114 
Lexington) Wheaton, English major; Glenn Huisinga, (1265 River Drive) Calumet City, 
agricultural economics; Robert L. Miller, (Box 253) Mt. Olive, psychology major; 
Victor R. Cook, (R.R.2) Carbondale, theatre major; Kenneth Duft, (1705 Zschokke) 
Highland, agricultural economics major; Dayton Thomas, (R.R.4) Carbondale, 
agricultural economics major; John M. Ritenhouse, (643 S. West) Galesburg, English 
major; William A, Ettling, Carbondale, mathematics major; James G, Wrone, (1125 
E, Jefferson) Clinton, economics major; James Adams, (R.R.I) Ava, history major; 
Rosemary McClain, Rosmond, botany major; Susan Pennington, (413 W. Jackson) 
Carbondale, theatre major. 

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Seven area women given citations as "Career Women of the Year" at the second 
annual district Business and Professional Women's Conference held recently at 
Southern Illinois University. 

Left to right: Pearl Roberts of Johnston City, professional secretary; 

Mrs. Margaret Joy of Carterville, social worker; Mrs. Sybil Davison of Christopher, 

newspaper executive; Mrs. Dorothy Spomer of Cairo, county judge; Marguarita Barra 

of Johnston City, librarian; Mrs. Imogene Arenzman of Metropolis, teacher; and 

Mrs, Christine E. Tregoning of Carterville, licensed insurance broker and tax 

consultant. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11 - 12 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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From Bill Lyons ? <J VV 11 - 13 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY ? A 

Carbondale, Illinois ly" . /\ 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

(NOTE TO EDITORS) The following is written especially for American Education Week* 
Nov, 11-17, and represents the thinking on the "Future of American Education" by 
four distinguished educators at Southern Illinois University). 

CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — American education has moved into a "great new era 
of science, technology and industry," but it has not yet asked itself what is really 
required in this strange new world, four distinguished visiting educators at 
Southern Illinois University observed today as American Education Week got under 
way (Nov. 11-17), 

"Our education has always been oriented toward the West, and other cultures 
just didn't count," said Dr. George S. Counts, a man considered the leading 
authority on Soviet education. "We have very little understanding of other peoples, 
even Latin America and particularly the Orient. 

"Now we're not really prepared to bear the responsibility history has placed 
upon us," Counts said. Understanding of this trorld is what we need, not narrow 
specialization," 

"We need to give all our children contact with reality," agreed 
Dr, George Axtelle, professor of administration and supervision in the College of 
Education, "The life of the adult today is so complex that we're failing to 
initiate the child into our culture," 

"The primary aim of our schools must be to prepare youth for the responsibilities; 
of life not just for leisure time," said Dr, John Childs, professor of philosophy, 
"I'm not just talking about vocational education but preparation for citizenship, 
family life. In other words, youth must be prepared for the different roles he must 
play in today's world. Unfortunately, we teachers do not spell out too definitely 
just what these roles are." 

Nelson Bossing, professor of secondary education, agreed with Axtelle that 
"vocational training is exceedingly important, but the real crisis is the factor of 
how much specialization. We can' t ignore the trend - but a person in any vocation 
must also be able to see his particular job's relationship and consequence to 
society as a whole." -more- 



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Counts said, "we need to recognize that education is not confined to the 
schools. The mass media - the agerage youth spends more time watching television 
than he does in school * opens new horizons. Complete dependence on schools 
therefore to educate our youth is naive." 

Counts noted that the Soviets are" pushing television as an education tool," 
while we are using it "primarily for entertainment." 

"We have to raise our sights in education and raise the status of the teacher," 
Counts said. "Not just economically - but as a professional worker. There is no 
profession requiring more arduous training than that of the teacher." 

The American public school system is "perhaps the most glorious achievement 
of mankind," the educators agreed, and education holds the answer to the problems 
of living in today's complex society. 

"Our profession represents the future," Counts said. "We are guardians 
and molders of the future." 



-Ik- 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11 - 13 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov, — Although allowing its opponents 14 points a game 
has been disastrous for Southern Illinois University this season, the Salukis 
may be happy to settle for that amount this weekend when they meet rugged Bowling 
Green on the road. 

Coach Carmen Piccone's outfit, which conceivably could be undefeated if it 
possessed just a bit more offensive punch, is currently 4-4 and each of its 
conquerors have wound up with the same number of points— 14, 

Southern bowed to Drake 14-13, to Texas A, & I, 14-10, to Northern Michigan 
14-9 and last weekend to Ft, Campbell 14-7. 

The Salukis, however, in three previous encounters with Bowling Green have 
been unable to restrict the Falcons to just two touchdowns. In the first meeting 
between the two schools Bowling Green came from behind to gain a 23-14 victory and 
followed up with 27-6 and 20-0 decisions. 

And Southern, except for an easy 43-6 rout of IIAC champion Central Michigan, 
has been unable to score more than two touchdowns in any game despite the fact its 
offensive unit has averaged 270 yards. 

'We respect Bowling Green probably more than any team on our schedule," 
Piccone said, "but by the same token the boys would probably prefer to upset them 
more than any other team. We need the victory and I don't anticipate any dificulty 
in getting the club up," 

Under Coach Doyt Perry the Falcons have won 59, lost eight and tied five in 
the past eight seasons and have claimed championships in the tough Mid-American 
Conference three out of the past four years. 

Only team to stop Bowling Green this season has been West Texas State and the 

Buffaloes last week were 20-13 victims of North Texas State, Southern's opponent 

next Saturday when the Salukis close out their season at home, 

-fh- 


















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' 









From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11 - 13 - 62 
Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. ■- No less than 11 candidates are still battling for 
starting assignments as first-year coach Jack Hartman continues to send Southern 
Illinois University's cagers through lengthy drills in an effort to ready them 
for the season's opener which is just two weeks away. 

The Salukis, who last year claimed third place in the NCAA college-division 
tournament, are being bolstered by the return of nine lettermen, but will be facing 
a much tougher schedule in Southern's first year as an athletic independent. 

Best fight for a first-team berth appears to be at one guard spot where 
three juniors, Eldon Bigham, Pinckneyville, Centralia's Rod Linder and Eddie Blythe, 
Carbondale, are waging intensive campaigns. Linder, on the basis of last year's 
performances, is the strongest scoring threat of the trio, but the position demands 
an accomplished play-maker and Bigham and Blythe seem to have the nod in that 
respect. 

Newcomer Paul Henry, Indianapolis, appears to have the other guard spot 
wrapped up, at least for the present time, while his former Coffeyville Jr. 
College teammate, Lou Williams of Indianapolis, is dueling veteran Frank Lentfer, 
Riverdale, for the number one center job. 

Co-captains Dave Henson, Dupo, and Ed Spila, Chicago, are among the five 
forwards still in the running for starting assignments. Harold Hood, former 
West Frankfort prep star who was Southern's third-ranking scorer last season, is 
applying pressure as are sophomores Joe Ramsey, Sandoval and Duane Warning, 
Frankfort. 

The Salukis open their season Nov. 30 against Gannon College and meet 
St. Bonaventure the following night at Buffalo. 



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SOUTHERN ILLINOIS INC. 
Goffrey Hughes 
Box 7 Carterville, Illinois 
YUkon 5-4656 

CARTERVILLE, ILL., Nov. — Fifty-one southern Illinois boosters will carry the 
message to northern Illinoisans at the third biennial Southern Illinois Day in 
Chicago Friday (Nov. 30). 

"We are inviting everyone in southern Illinois to attend, but we 1 re particularly 
urging southern Illinoisans to write friends and relatives in the Chicago area 
to visit the splendid assortment of exhibits ," said R.L. Hendrickson, Mt. Vernon, 
general chairman of a Southern Illinois, Inc. committee which planned the event, 

"All exhibit spaces are now reserved, and everything points to the biggest 
and best show yet," Goffrey Hughes, executive director of SII, said. 

Purpose of Southern Illinois Day, an all-day exposition to be held in the 
Prudential Building, is to sell Chicagoans and northern Illinoisans on Southern 
Illinois recreational potential. 

The first Southern Illinois Day in Chicago was held in 1958, and another in 
1960. 

Among special guests will be Pam Gilbert, Carbondale, a student at Southern 
Illinois University and the 1962 "Miss Illinois," who will be present as guest of 
United Cities Gas Co. 

Hughes said exhibitors who will be displaying at the event are: 

Good Luck Glove Co., Bonifield Brothers Truck Lines, Jamison Realty, The 
Southern Illinoisan, Carbondale Chamber of Commerce, Southern Illinois University, 
Southern Illinois Business Agents Conference, Outdoor Illinois Magazine, General 
Telephone Co., DuQuoin State Fair, Greater Egypt Regional Planning Commission. 

State Geological Survey, Crab Orchard Playground Association, Lakewood Park, 
United Cerebral Palsy, Illinois Recreation -Resources, Inc., Illinois Bell Telephone, 
Co., Marion Chamber of Commerce, Lawrenceville Development Commission, Board of 
Economic Development, Union County Sportsman's Club, Area Realty, Inc., Southern 
Illinois Arts & Crafts Guild, Cairo Chamber of Commerce, University of Illinois 
Cooperative Extension Service, Illinois Central Railroad. -more- 



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Kaskaskia Valley Association, Central Illinois Public Service Co., Rend Lake 
Association, Diagraph-Bradley Industries, Inc., Illinois Pox*er Co., Murphysboro 
Chamber of Commerce, Shawnee Hills Recreation Association, Mt, Vernon Chamber of 
Commerce, Operation Greater Mt. Vernon, Museum of Transport, United Electric Coal 
Co., U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Shawnee National Forest, Department of 
Conservation, Ozark Air Lines, Illinois Division of Forests, Norge Sales Co., 
Sullivan Chamber of Commerce, Shelbyville Chamber of Commerce, Vandalia Chamber 
of Commerce, Carlyle-Beckemeyer Chamber of Commerce, Kaskaskia Industrial 
Development Corp., Peabody Coal Corp., and Retirement-Recreation Development 
Corporation of Illinois 



-30- 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone; 453-2276 



11 - 13 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — The 12th annual Parents Day at Southern Illinois 
University Saturday (Nov* 10) saw more than 1,000 parents of students visit the 
campus to enjoy a daylong program* 

Co-chairmen Wayne P. Comstock of Geneva and Marian K, Dean of Collinsville 
said Mr. and Mrs* William Kulessa of (31C West H.St) Belleville and Mr. and Mrs. 
Herman Smith Sr. of (201 Terry) Madison were honored as "Parents of the Day." 
They were guests of SIU President and Mrs. Delyte W. Morris at a morning coffee and 
during the football game with Ft. Campbell, Ky. which Southern lost, 14 to 7. 

Other events of the day included campus tours, a coffee hour with the 
faculty, a buffet dinner and a dance. The two couples chosen to symbolize all the 
parents of Southern's 16,000 students were given engraved silver bowls at the 
dinner in recognition of their selection. 

Comstock and Miss Dean said, "We were certainly pleased with the turnout 
of parents." 

At half time of the football game the Kulessas saw their daughter, Trudy, 
a cheerleader, present a University Foundation award to John Rush, SIU gymnast 
who dons a Saluki dog costume to help the cheerleaders entertain and enthuse the 
spectators. Rush, from Arlington Heights, is a design student whose sideline 
antics have earned him the nick-name, "Hey Dog," 



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Froia Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 13 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. «•- Two southern Illinois communities have extended 
Thanksgiving vacation invitations to foreign students at Southern Illinois 
University and several Carbondale residents will again host international students 
on Thanksgiving day. 

Uillis G. Swartz, foreign student adviser at SIU, said plans have been 
completed for 14 foreign students to spend a three-day Thanksgiving vacation in 
homes at Robinson, 111. The program there has been carried out for several years 
under the sponsorship of the Robinson Council of Churches. 

Albion has also invited 14 students for the vacation period through the 
Rev. Tom U. Shepherd formerly of Carbondale. International students may sign up 
for this trip at the foreign student office. A waiting list will be maintained 
in case of trip vacancies. 

Mrs. Mary N, Wakeland, assistant foreign student adviser, said many of the 
foreign students will not be able to leave Carbondale for the entire vacation 
period, but would welcome invitations for Thanksgiving day only. 

She said Carbondale area families interested in inviting international 
students to their homes for the holiday should contact her at the Graduate 
School, telephone 453-2357. 



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From Bill Lyons ^/ilitiM 11-13-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — Southern Illinois University's "electronic brain" 
is staying awake nights this v/eelc— trying to figure the outcome of a football 
game, 

A couple of football fans at the Data Processing and Computing Center have 
crammed an IBM 1620 computer with every statistic they can think of on the 
strengths and performances of SIU's Salukis and the North Texas State Eagles, The 
two play here Nov. 24 in the final game of the year for both teams, 

John Hamblen, director of the Center, and Tom Purcell, computing division 
manager, are doping out the game in their spare time. They've dubbed the project 
SCORE (Statistical Correlation of Ranked Efficiencies), but refuse to predict 
whether their prediction will be predictable, 

"It's hard to select variables that will really tell you what you want to know," 
says Purcell, So the two have run the computer through a massive menu of facts 
including everything from players' weights, heights and marital status to individual 
quarters of playing time this year and last. 

The analyzers will determine which information the machine seems to get the 
most nourishment out of, then feed it a selective diet for the final run. They 
think it may disgorge a revelation by Nov, 19, 

North Texas State and SIU will be playing each other for the first time. 
Also complicating the prognostica tor's task is the fact that neither team's schedule 
has included a common opponent, SIU has a 4-4 won-lost record after Nov. 10, The 
Eagles are 5-3, 

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From Bill Lyons i? \ 11-13-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phnne: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — Southern Illinois University's School of Business 
has announced an open-to-the-public lecture series to begin Thursday (Nov. 15) 
at 7:30 p.m. in the agriculture auditorium. 

Dr. Ulysses Grant Dubach, prominent writer of political science articles and 
former dean of men at Oregon State, will be the first lecturer. He will speak on 
"The Meaning of America." 

Other lectures include Tilford E. Dudley, director of the Speakers Bureau 
of the AFL-CIO, who will appear here Jan. 17; E.M. O'Neill, chairman of the 
St. Louis chapter of the Young President's Organization, April 3, 1963; and 
Dr. Lillian Gilbreth, pioneer writer and researcher in management and mother of 
the author of "Cheaper by the Dozen," May 16, 1963. 



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Four of America's most distinguished educators, discussing "The 

Future of American Education" during American Education Week 

(Nov. 11-17) look over blueprints of new $2.9 million College of Education 

building at Southern Illinois University, scheduled to be completed in August, 1963. 

Pictured are (1 to r) : Dr. Nelson Bossing, professor of secondary education; 

Dr. George S, Counts, considered America's leading authority on Soviet education; 

Dr. John Childs, professor of philosophy; and Dr. George Axtelle, professor of 

educational administration and supervision. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11 - 13 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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First unit of Newman Club complex being constructed adjacent to Southern 

Illinois University to serve Catholic students and University personnel. This 

unit, to cost $300,000, is scheduled for completion by March 1, 1963. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11-14-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 






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From Bill Lyons 11 - 14 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — First unit of a new Newman Center complex for 
CatLolic students and faculty at Southern Illinois University is scheduled for 
completion by March 1, 1963, according to Father Cletus Hentschel, Neivrman director. 

This first unit, costing approximately $300,000, will include a multi-purpose 
area for general assemblies, social activities and religious services; a lounge, 
snack bar and kitchen; two offices and a library. 

At present more than 2,000 Catholic students are enrolled at SIU. 

The Newman Center offers four fully accredited courses in religion for 
Catholic and nan- Catholic students alike, Father Hentschel said. 

Temporary chapel facilities are provided in the unit now under construction 
to serve all Catholic students and University personnel for masses and other 
religious services, he said. The second unit of the complex will provide a separate 
independent church building, together with classrooms. 

Funds for the present construction were made available through the Southern 
Illinois Educational Expansion Drive which Father Hentschel directed as diocesan 
moderator for the Catholic Diocese of Belleville. 



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NEW INITIATES in the Southern Illinois University Alpha Gamma chapter of 

Kappa Alpha Mu, national honorary photo-journalism fraternity include, front 

row, left to right, Keith Hackleman, RR.4, Vandalia; Morris E. Utiles, 121 

N. Pennsylvania, Belleville; Mike Rambo, 5721 McVicker, Chicago. In the back 

row, left to right are: Frank A. Pratt of Fairbury, national Kappa Alpha Mu 

president; Lawrence J. Gregory, 9204 Arline, Overland, Mo # ; John G. Rubin, 

1605 Thelin Court, Evanston and Jon R. Blomquist, 9130 South 52nd Ct., Oak 

Lawn, Alpha Gamma chapter president. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11-14-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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RECENT PLEDGES to the Alpha Gamma chapter of Kappa Alpha Mu, national 

honorary photo- journal ism fraternity at Southern Illinois University are shown 

receiving flashbulb becklaces and cans of photographic chemicals which they must 

display during pledging ceremonies. Left to right they are: Stephen L. Murtaugh, 

510 S. Congress, Polo; Robert Miller, formerly of RR«3, Freeport; Jacob T, Uilliams, 

Chicago; Donna Casey, 710 E. Market, Red Bud; Richard M. Prillaman, Potomac and 

Jon R. Blomquist, chapter president, of 9130 S. 52nd Crt., Oak Lawn. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11 - 14 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 




^3 



From Bill Lyons 11 - 14 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov, — Representatives of the Southern Illinois University 
undergraduate chapter of Sigma Delta Chi, national professional journalistic 
society, left today (Nov. 14) to attend the society's national convention 
in Tulsa, Okla. 

Erik Stottrup, junior from Decatur (277 S. Marland Place) is the official 
delegate of the SIU chapter, D.G, Schumacher, senior from Pana, is the 
alternate delegate. 

Also attending the three-day convention are Ernest Heltsley, senior from 
West Frankfort, and Charles C. Clayton, professor of journalism at SIU and 
chapter adviser, Clayton is a past national president of Sigma Delta Chi, 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 14 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE , ILL., Nov. — The Southern Illinois University Press will 
honor Mrs. Georgia Winn, editor, and several contributors to "The Search: 
Second Series" at a tea Thursday (Nov. 15) from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Renaissance 
Room of the University Center. 

The tea is one of the University Press "Meet our Author" events and is open 
to faculty and students. Contributors to the book are present and past students 
of SIU. 

Dr. Winn is a native of Blossom, Tex. and former head of the English department 
of Texas State College, Alpine, Tex. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




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11 - 14 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Dr. Ed Shea, chairman of Southern Illinois 
University's department of physical education for men, has been named chairman of 
water safety for the Jackson County Red Cross, it was announced today. 

The appointment was made by Frank Gumm, chairman of the Jackson County Red 
Cross chapter, who noted that Shea's "experience and knowledge in this field is 
widely known in southern Illinois." Shea was a former technical advisor to the 
American Red Cross swimming and water safety services for the southeastern area, 
(Georgia, Tenn. , and Alabama); founder and director of the Atlanta, Ga. Swimming 
Association; and vice chairman of the National AAU swimming committee. He is also 
chairman of the Southern Illinois Swimming Association, and a member of the 
swimming committee of the Central Association of the AAU, the committee on 
swimming pool standards of the Tile Manufacturers Association, and of Governor 
Kerner's advisory committee on youth fitness. 

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CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — The Fifth Annual Southern Illinois Tax Conference, 
sponsored by the southern chapter of the Illinois Society of Certified Public 
Accountants and Southern Illinois University's School of Business, will be held 
at SIU Saturday (Nov. 17). 

Special invitations have been extended to accountants, lawyers, insurance 
men, businessmen and SIU students and professors in the tax fields. 

Subjects to be discussed include "Self-Employed Retirement Act of 1962," 
"New Depreciation Rules," "Estate Planning," and "Travel and Entertainment 
Expense Reporting Under the Revenue Act of 1962." 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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Release: IMMEDIATE 



SIU NEWS SUMMARY 
FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION 

Four distinguished educators at Southern Illinois University have noted that 
American education has moved into a great new era of science, technology and 
industry,.. but has not yet asked itself what is really required of education in 
this strange new world. They made their observations as American Education Week 
got under way (Nov. 11-17). Dr. George S, Counts, a man considered the leading 
authority on Soviet education, said "Understanding of this world is what we need, 
not narrow specialization." Dr. George Axtelle, professor of administration and 
supervision, said teachers need to "give all our children contact with reality," 
and Dr. John Childs, professor of philosophy, noted that the primary aim of 
education must be to "prepare youth for the responsibilities of life." 
Nelson Bossing, professor of secondary education, said the real problem is 
specialization. We can't ignore the trend.. .but a person in any vocation must be 
able to see his particular job's relationship and consequence to society as a 
whole. The educators also said complete dependence on schools to educate our youth 
is "naive," that we must take advantage of other educational outlets - radio, 
television, newspapers. They felt education holds the answer to the problems of 
living in today's complex society. As Counts put it... our profession represents 
the future. We are guardians and molders of the future of our country. 

* * * * 

Fifty-one southern Illinois boosters will acquaint northern Illinoisans with 
the area at the third biennial Southern Illinois Day in Chicago Friday (Nov. 30). 
Purpose of the event, a day-long affair in the Prudential Building, is to tell 
Chicagoans about southern Illinois recreational potential. 



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Southern Illinois University's graduate school is rounding out its second 
decade of operation with an enrollment of 1-thousand 2-hundred 57 in 51 advanced 
degree programs on the Carbondale campus. Graduate enrollment has nearly doubled 
in the past five years. 

* * * * 

S-I-U's "electronic brain" is staying aw&ke nights this week... trying to 
figure the outcome of a football game. A couple of football fans at Southern's 
Data Processing and Computing Center have crammed an electronic computer with 
every statistic they can think of on the strengths and performances of SIU's 
Salukis and the North Texas State Eagles, The two play in Carbondale November 24th 
in the final game of the year for both teams. The machine is expected to disgorge 
an answer within a i*eek, 

* * * * 

Taking a trolley to the theater isn't the pleasant venture it sounds like 
when you're in Zaka, Southern Rhodesia. What it means, says Dr. Richard V. Lee, 
director of Southern Illinois University's Health Service, is taking a stretcher 
(trolley) to the operating room (theater). Dr. Lee is spending nine months at 
the Southern Rhodesian Christian Hospital. Unusual aspects of the job: treating 
tropic ulcers, yaws, malaria, nutritional deficiencies... and.. .crocodile bites. 



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From Bill Lyons WiCJW^ 11 - 14 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: EDIATE 

EDITORS: Note local names 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — , Southern Illinois 

University Vocational Technical Institute retailing student (s) from 



b , is (are) among 13 who will start fall term on-the-job work 



experience in cooperating retail stores Monday (Nov, 19), 

Walter J. Elder, VTI coordinator of retailing programs, says students 

specializing in the two-year retailing courses of study, spend a total of at least 

20 weeks during their second year in supervised on-the-job training. The group 

starting Monday will return January 2 for several weeks of classroom studies before 

taking another field assignment. They will graduate next summer with an Associate 

in Business degree. 

The students (by home towns) and their place of work experience are: 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS: John T, Mutti (314 N. Beverly Lane) at Carson, Pirie, 

Scott & Co, Randhurst store at Mt, Prospect; and 
Thomas Rose (100 S, Deury Lane) at The Fair Store at 
Mt, Prospect, 

BOURBONNAIS : Robert J, Schimmelpfennig (M6 Burches Trailer Ct,) at Sears, 

Roebuck a Co,, Kankakee, 
BRADFORD: Cheryl Hall at Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co, in Peoria. 
BRADLEY: James W. Sowers (704 Cook Blvd.) at Hornsley's Variety Store in 
Meadowview Shopping Center, Kankakee, 

CHICAGO: Karl A. Forster (913 West Fletcher) at The Fair Store, Chicago, 

DECATUR: Russell Arnold (56 Northland Drive ) at Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co., 
Decatur; Willard R. Best (1520 W, Waggoner) at the Kroger Store in 
Marion; and Norman R. Pifer (1055 East Prairie) _at the Kroger Store 
in Carbondale, 

ELKVILLE: Daniel Lewis at an F.W. Woolworth Store in Chicago. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN,: Marilyn Potts (5816 Ewing) at Cecile's Fashion Shop in 

Carbondale, 

NORTH CHICAGO: Robert J. Kuderko (1735 Park) at Sears, Roebuck & Co., Waukegar. 

THAWVILLE: Paul F. Eshleman at Illinois Brokerage Store, Carbondale. 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 14 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Car bond ale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Miss Frances K. Phillips, assistant professor 
in Southern Illinois University's department of health education, has been 
appointed an associate editor of the Journal of School Health, it was announced 
today. 

The magazine serves as the professional publication of the American School 
Health Association. The appointment was made by Dr. Delbert Oberteuffer, editor 
of the journal and professor of health and physical education at Ohio State 
University. 



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From Bill Lyons V A 11-15-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY O 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

Number 4G1 in a weekly series — "It Happened in Southern Illinois" — a series 
consisting of regional folklore and historical accounts suitable for feature, 
column, or editorial use. 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS SPAWNED 
WORLD'S MOST UNUSUAL NAVY 
By John W, Allen 
Southern Illinois University 

If someone should remark about our navy on the "Western Waters," most persons 
would think in some vague way about war craft on the Pacific, A hundred or more years 
ago Western Waters would have had a definite meaning. The term then was applied to 
the Ohio, the Mississippi, and their tributaries, all definitely without a navy now. 
At one time it had a real navy, one made up of a few hundred craft. Some of these 
were among the more heavily armored ones afloat. 

This unusual navy that grew up very quickly remains unique. History offers 
little to parallel it. Its story should hold more than passing interest for southern 
Illinois, for it was on the six mile stretch of the Ohio from Mound City to Cairo that 
this strange flotilla had its rendezvous. Here much of it was assembled, built and 
outfitted. Here it also returned for repairs after battle. Numerous "steamers" 
were made into "gunboats." After the war many surviving boats were turned back from 
'gunboats' to 'steamers. 1 

This assorted flotilla came into being early in the war, served its purpose, 
quietly vanished, and was almost forgotten. It began within a week after the fall of 
Sumter when James B. Eads of St. Louis was called to Washington and asked to design 
and build war craft for use on the rivers. Captain John Rodgers was loaned from the 
navy to assist Eads, In July three gunboats, the Lexington, the Tyler, and the 
Conestoga were completed at Cincinnati. Low river stages delayed their arrival at 
Cairo for six weeks. These were wooden vessels built at the insistence of Rodgers. 

In the month of July bids were asked and accepted for seven others, all to be 

armored. Delivery was promised by October 10. Work began promptly, A force of 

4,000 men worked day and night to build the hulls. Sub-contractors worked to have 

boilers, engines, equipment, and armor ready, 

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The first of these seven boats, the St. Louis, V7as launched on October 12. These 
seven boats, known as the Cairo class, were built on standard river hulls, about 
175 feet long, 75 feet wide and had a draft of si:: feet. This allowed them to 
operate on principal streams. Each carried 13 guns and had a casement or belt of 
armor sloping up from the water line. 

Before the seven boats of the Cairo class were completed, two other powerful 
boats, the Benton and the Essex, former snag boats, were converted into gunboats. 
They had the usual casements of sloping armor plus three inches of plate on their 
hulls. They were 300 feet long, formidable craft in any navy of that time. These 
nine boats, seven of the Cairo class and the two last mentioned, made up the hard 
core of the navy on the Western Waters. Much credit for victories at Fort Henry, 
Fort Donelson and at Memphis was due them for the services they rendered. 

About the same time a new series of river craft appeared. They were steamers 
converted into rams. Each had a below-water line extension, a beak, built on its 
front. This made the entire boat into a kind of projectile that could be aimed at 
the opposing craft. They were used successfully by both the Union and Confederate 
forces. Boats of the Ram Fleet came from designs and plans made by Colonel 
Charles Ellett, Jr., who commanded the first group. A book, the "History of the 
Ram Fleet and Marine Brigade" tells their full story. 

The next two boats added to the Cairo flotilla were the Choctaw and the 
Lafayette, side-wheel steamers. These were 230 feet long and were armored with one 
inch of steel having an inch of India rubber beneath to "make the shot bounce off," 
That didn't work so well. 

One of the storied boats added to the river fleet was the Eastland, a fine boat 

230 feet long. This boat, partially completed, was captured by the Lexington, Tyler, 

and Conestoga on a daring raid up the Tennessee in early February of 1862. It was 

taken to Cairo, completed, and commissioned in August. Its record was an enviable 

one until March, 1064 when it ran aground in the Red River and was blown up to 

prevent its capture by the Confederates, 

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In the fall and winter of 1C62 about 20 "tinclads" were added to the flotilla. 
These were small river steamers with a half or three quarters inch of armor plate. 
None of the tinclads drew more than three feet of water, some less than 1G inches. 
They could go up many creeks and were most useful against guerrillas. 

After the clash of the Monitor and Virginia Merrimac in April, 1362 the demand 
for boats of the Monitor type increased, Eads accordingly built two such boats with 
turrets. These were followed by four others, larger and screw-driven. These were 
double turreted craft. Much improved over previous models, many of their best 
features still are used in warships. These four boats were the Winnebago, the 
Kickapoo, the Milwaukee, and the Chickasaw, To all these boats should be added the 
many barges built to carry mortar. 

The Western Waters indeed saw an unconventional naval war. It can hardly be 
compared with any other, before or since. It remains unique, and to say "It 
Happened in Southern Illinois," is not altogether wrong. 



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In the fall and winter of 1C62 about 20 "tinclads" were added to the flotilla. 
These x*ere small river steamers with a half or three quarters inch of armor plate. 
None of the tinclads drew more than three feet of water, some less than 1G inches. 
They could go up many creeks and were most useful against guerrillas. 

After the clash of the Monitor and Virginia Merrimac in April, 1862 the demand 
for boats of the Monitor type increased. Eads accordingly built two such boats with 
turrets. These were followed by four others, larger and screw-driven. These were 
double turreted craft. Much improved over previous models, many of their best 
features still are used in warships. These four boats were the Winnebago, the 
Kickapoo, the Milwaukee, and the Chickasaw. To all these boats should be added the 
many barges built to carry mortar. 

The Western Waters indeed saw an unconventional naval war. It can hardly be 
compared with any other, before or since. It remains unique, and to say "It 
Happened in Southern Illinois," is not altogether wrong. 



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From Bill Lyons f I 11-15-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

ATTENTION: FARM EDITORS 

SIU COUNTRY COLUMN 
By Albert Meyer 

With cold weather approaching and much of the harvesting and field work done 
on the farm for this season, it is time for idle farm machines to be put into storage 
says J.J, Paterson, Southern Illinois University agricultural engineer. 

The average farmer today has an investment in farm machinery that easily may 
run to $15,000 or $20,000, There always is depreciation on such machinery, he points 
out, but how fast it takes place depends much on the farmer's good operation and 
management practices. The end of the field where the machine last was used, or 
under a big tree in the barn yard, are not good places to store a $500 plow or 
manure spreader, or a $4,000 grain combine. 

Some kind of farm structure in which to house all idle farm machines should be 
part of the farmstead. The building need not be elaborate and expensive, but should 
have a substantial roof and be closed on at least the three sides from which most of 
the bad winter weather comes. Pole type sheds are quite satisfactory, Paterson says. 
The open exposure should be to the south or east. Plan machine storage so that those 
needed most often or first in the spring will be available without moving a lot of 
other machines. 

Even storage buildings do not entirely prevent machinery from deteriorating 

when idle for extended periods of time. Hence, machines need cleaning and 

lubricating before storing. Moving parts can thus be protected, adding many days 

of operating time to the life of the machine. A few simple precautions with power 
units on motor driven farm machines, such as field choppers, hay balers and self- 
propelled combines will prevent rust and corrosion danage to engine valves, upper 
cylinders and bearings during storage. 

For protecting such engines, drain out old crankcase oil and put in new, change 
the oil filter and run the engine for a few minutes to circulate the oil to all parts 
Take out spark plugs and pour three tablespoons of oil into each cylinder, replace 
the plugs and turn the engine two revolutions to distribute the oil over the cylinder 
walls and valves. Plug air intake and exhaust pipes to keep moisture out of the 
engine, and either drain the water from the cooling system or put in a good 
antifreeze, -am- 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



SD 



11 - 14 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — A new brochure to explain "Community Development: 
a Continuing Process" has been issued by Southern Illinois University's department 
of community development, Robert Knittel, director, announced today. 

Among subjects discussed are "Community Problems," "Cooperative Approaches," 
"Organization," "Training for Local Leadership," "Community Self -Appraisal," 
"Survey and Study," "Consultation," "Research," "Problem Solving," "Decision 
Making," "Action," and "Review and Evaluation." 

"Using the community development process," Knittel said, "every citizen has 
an opportunity to participate in decisions affecting him, his immediate family, 
his neighborhood, and his community. To get citizens to take advantage of this 
opportunity to accept civic responsibility is one of the primary aims of community 
development." 



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SPECIAL TO OKLAHOMA NEWSPAPERS, RADIO AND TV 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. —Led by team captain Jack Schiltz, NCAA 60-yard 
record-holder Ray Padovan and sophomore standouts Ted Petras and Darrell Green, 
Southern Illinois University's swim team will challenge the University of Oklahoma 
at Norman Friday (Nov. 23). 

Southern, which has competed against the Sooners and Oklahoma State in 
wrestling for several years and in track for the past two seasons, will also be 
sending its basketball squad to Norman early next month as the Salukis have a 
Dec. 10 date with Oklahoma. 

The Saluki swimmers, who last year dropped to a 2-4 record while losing to 
untouchable Indiana, Cincinnati, Minnesota and Iowa State, expect to be somewhat 
improved this season, but may not fare any better as their schedule has likewise 
toughened . 

Strongest event for SIU appears to be the breaststroke where Schiltz (2:18.0) 
and Petras (62.3) are available. Padovan, a veteran from North Miami, Fla., heads 
the sprint group and will receive assistance from another senior, John Fischbeck. 

Green has given *svery indication of becoming the best backstroker in 
Southern's history and the Salukis also appear to be well fortified in the diving 
event with John Robbins the top man in a trio which also includes Ernie Gonzales 
and A. G. Edwards. 

Southern's chief weakness will probably be in the distance events and 

Coach Ralph Casey is also still looking for a fourth member of both relay teams. 

-30- 

FROM: Fred Huff 
Sports Information Director 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 



3D 

From Bill Lyons ~ { A 11 - 15 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois L\ 

Phone: 453-2276 \ Release: IMMEDIATE 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — A slightly improved quail population awaited most 
southern Illinois hunters when the season opened Saturday noon (Nov. 17), but 
pickings may be slim in a narrow "drouth strip" from the Mississippi River to 
western edges of Williamson and Jackson Counties. 

That's the forecast by Southern Illinois University's Cooperative Wildlife 
Research Laboratory, which has been analyzing quail prospects with significant 
accuracy since 1950. Willard Klimstra, director, said quail counts are "the worst 
in eight years" on the laboratory's two major research areas near Carbondale and 
Pyatts. Both are located within a pocket of southern Illinois, from Carbondale 
north to around Nashville, hit hard by summer drouth conditions. 

"There's a direct relationship between summer rainfall and quail reproduction," 
Klimstra said," and a good rain distribution usually means higher quail nesting 
success," He said hatching success and numbers of young birds produced fell down 
this year on the observation areas. 

Reports from Laboratory sources and staff observations in other parts of 
southern Illinois, however, show an average five to 10 per cent increase in quail 
numbers, according to Klimstra. The total population still won't equal the 1957, 
and 1958 seasons, peak years in the laboratory's studies. 

The laboratory's yearly surveys, conducted cooperatively with the Illinois 

Natural History Survey, include the use of dogs and SIU zoology students under 

Klimstra. The field teams conduct "drive censuses" and also gather reports from 

farmers and sportsmen working their own dogs. 

After the survey's 13th pre-season tally, Klimstra is guardedly skeptical of 
the future of quail hunting in southern Illinois. "There is without question a 
continuing decline in the quality of quail habitat in this area," he said. 

The trend towards one-crop and grassland farming and away from combination farms 
has hurt most, Klimstra said. Moreover data collected by the laboratory shows little 
gain in quail or cottontail populations on conservation reserve or soilbank land. 
VThe cover there is either too dense or contains little food," he said. 

The Illinois quail season runs through Dec. 31, but is closed during the 
shotgun deer hunting season (Nov. 30-Dec. 5) in those counties that have it. 

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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 15 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Two Southern Illinois University geographers are 
representing the University Friday and Saturday (Nov, 16-17) at the installation 
of Clarence W. Sorensen, former dean of the graduate school at Illinois State 
Normal University, as president of Augustana College, Rock Island. They are 
Robert A. Harper, SIU geography department chairman, and Charles C. Colby, 
director of Mississippi Valley Investigations. Mrs. Harper will accompany them. 

Sorensen formerly studied under Colby. Harper has been a collaborator 
with him in authoring a series of geography textbooks. 



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From Bill Lyons Hf" 11-15-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Southern Illinois University's music department 
will unveil its new faculty string quartet, first such chamber group in the 
department's history, at a public concert Sunday (Nov. 13). 

The University Quartet will include three new members of the music faculty 
and violinist John Wharton, 18-year member of the department who has been associated 
with previous string ensembles, none of them given the "permanent institution" 
stamp that heralds the newest arrival. 

"This group will be a nucleus for new chamber music programs and a strengthened 
string instruction program," said Robert Mueller, chairman of the department. 

With Wharton will be violinist Warren Van Bronfchorst, new conductor of the 
Southern Illinois Symphony Orchestra. He played previously \tith the Rochester 
Philaharmonic and was concertmaster for the Honolulu Symphony. Violist Thomas Hall 
played with the University of California's Trojan Quartet, and before coming to 
SIU this year was first chair player for the Chattanooga Symphony. 

Cellist Arthur Hunkins, serving on a one year appointment, was first chair 
with the Michigan Symphony at the University of Michigan, 

For its debut program at 4 p.m., in SIU's Shryock Auditorium, the quartet will 
play three major works in the string quartet repertoire. Mozart's "Quartet in D 
Minor," dedicated to Haydn, is listed by critics as one of his 10 best. 

Beethoven's "Quartet in E Minor, Op. 59, No. 2" is one of the three 
"Rasoumovsky Quartets," written for a 19th century chamber music patron and 
originator of the first professional string quartet in Europe. 

The concluding "String Quartet, Opus 10," is the only such work written by 
France's Claude Debussy, and won for him the "Prix de Rome." 



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Bill Lyons 11 - 16 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UMR^RSITY 

Carbondcle, Illinois 

Phone: ipl - 2276 Release: MEDIATE 



C/VTiBQNDADS, ILL., Nov. — President Delyte W. Morris of Southern 
Illinois University will be the featured speaker at a meeting of East 
Central Illinois reporters and editors Nov. 29 at Champaign. 

Dr. Morris, who came to Southern in 1948 when the university had 
a staff of 250 and a student body of 3,013, has been asked to relate the 
work and problems involved in becoming a statewide educational institution 
with 16,000 students. 

He will be the guest of the East Central Illinois Press Club at a 
buffet dinner at the Inman Hotel. The club was formed last spring and 
numbers newspaper, radio, tv and public relations executives among its 
membership . 

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From Bill Lyons 11 - 16 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



SPECIAL TO COOK COUNTY EDITORS 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Southern Illinois University has 1,403 residents 
of Cook County attending classes at the Carbondale campus, according to a 
statistical report from the Data Processing Center. They range from freshmen to 
graduate students completing work for doctor of philosophy degrees. 

The Cook County contingent is the largest on campus, nosing out Jackson 
County's 1,119 students. Carbondale is located in Jackson County. 

The City of Chicago naturally leads the Cook County towns with 602 students, 
Distribution of students in the Chicago suburbs is shown on the statistical 
report of fall quarter enrollment as follows: 
(pick up from enclosed list) 




From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 16 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, 111., Nov. — Revolution as Latin Americans think about it 
will be the subject of a seminar on the Southern Illinois University campus 
Nov. 20, 52nd anniversary of the Mexican Revolution. 

Albert W. Bork, director of SIU's Latin American Institute, will speak at 
the second Latin American Seminar, at 7:30 p.m. in the Agriculture Building 
seminar room. 

Bork will discuss the Meacican Revolution of 1910— and other Latin uprisings, 
including those in Bolivia and Cuba. 

The seminars are sponsored jointly by the Latin American Institute and the 
Latin American Organization, a group of SIU students. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 16 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — One Southern Illinois University geographer will 
present a paper, two will discuss papers read by others, and another will be 
honored as a past president at the annual meeting of the National Council for 
Geographic Education in Chicago Friday and Saturday (Nov. 23-24). 

Robert A. Harper, chairman of the SIU geography department, will report 
on "Mississippi Valley Investigations" at one of the sessions. Miss Annemarie Kraus 
associate professor, will review papers on Latin American subjects, and John JaUle, 
a graduate assistant, will discuss research papers on studies of the Middle West. 

Floyd F. Cunningham, director of the SIU Climatology Laboratory, will be a 
guest of honor at the past president's reception. He is the only geographer to 
serve three terms as president of the Council (1942, 1943 and 1944). Prior to 
that he was secretary for four years and represented the organization at the 
International Geographical Congress in Warsaw, Poland, in 1934. Before becoming 
Climatology Laboratory director in 1959, he was SIU geography department chairman 
for 12 years. Previously he had 13 years of service as a departmental chairman in 
Alabama. 

Other members of the SIU geography faculty attending the meeting will be 
J. Allan Patmore and Miss Marjorie Shank. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11 - 16 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — Registration for an eight-weeks short course in 
Secretarial Bookkeeping Review for secretaries, stenographers and other office 
workers will be at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 27, in Room 213, University School, 
Carbondale. 

Harry B. B^.uemf eind , assistant dean of the Southern Illinois University 
Division of Technical and Adult Education, said the course, one of a series being 
offered, will be especially helpful for office workers planning to take examinations 
next May to quality as Certified Public Secretaries. The courses are being offered 
in cooperation with the area CPS chapter. 

The class will meet in University School from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. each Tuesday, 
beginning with registration night. Ernest Sorgen, Carbondale comptroller for 
Diagraph-Bradley Co., will teach the course. University personnel and veterans 
qualifying under the Illinois Military Scholarship program will be exempt from the 
tuition fee of $4. GO. Textbook fees will be $7 except for persons currently 
enrolled in a law review course which is using the same text. 

Additional information may be obtained from the SIU Technical and Adult 
Education Division office in Carbondale or from Pearl Roberts, certified public 
secretary, Box 66, Johnston City, 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERCITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 16 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — An Area Redevelopment Agency project to train 24 
nurse's aids in the Carbondale area under supervision of the Southern Illinois 
University Vocational Technical Institute has been approved, William Nagel, VTI 
coordinator of ARA projects, said today. He is awaiting clearance of authorization 
papers to begin the training program. 

Trainees will be referred by the Murphysboro office of the Illinois State 
Employment Service which serves Jackson, Union and Perry counties. Nagel says the 
training program will consist of two weeks of classroom instruction at the VTI 
campus and two weeks of on-the-job supervised training in the Jackson County 
Nursing Home at Murphysboro, Students will receive 30 hours of training per week. 

The Institute has received an allocation of $3,000 for the program. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



Si) 



11 - 16 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Almost 300 bound volumes and bundles of leaflets, 
brochures, and programs - examples of the work of one of America's "fine printers"— 
have been acquired by the Morris Library of Southern Illinois University. 

John Henry Nash of San Francisco began his career as an independent printer 
in 1916 and had a tremendous and distinguished output until his death in 1941, 
according to Ralph W. Bushee, SIU rare books librarian. 

Nash printed two exceptionally fine books on commission from William Randolph 
Hearst— "The Life of Phoebe Apperson Hearst," his mother, and an autobiography of 
his father, "The Life of George H. Hearst, California Pioneer." 

Nash's masterpiece, a four-volume edition of Dante's "Inferno," required six 
years of his time. Only 250 copies x;ere published. Before his death he was 
planning his greatest achievement and had prepared the elaborate prospectus for 
it— a folio edition of the St. Jerome or Vulgate Bible. He proposed a price of 
$1,000 per copy for the extremely limited four-volume edition. 

Nash spoke often on fine printing and was a regular lecturer at the University 
of Oregon, where the John Henry Nash Fine Arts Press was established in his name. 

The Nash collection at SIU belonged to Nell U. O'Day, Nash's personal librarian. 
Only one other of this magnitude exists, according to Bushee. It is Nash's own 
complete file of his publications, now in the library of the University of 
California at Berkeley, 



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From Bill Lyons , — 11 * 16 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY '-> 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — So your family is invited out for Thanksgiving 
Dinner— why not plan a festive breakfast for family and/or friends? 

This suggestion, accompanied by recipes for make-ahead hot breads, comes from 
the food and nutrition department at Southern Illinois University. 

Jan Harper, associate professor in the School of Home Economics, suggested 
a serve-yourself breakfast of fresh citrus fruits, now at their prime... sausage, 
bacon or ham with eggs kept hot in their own containers over water or candle... 
fancy jams and jellies.. .and of course a variety of hot sweet breads. 

"The breads can be prepared and baked ahead, frozen, then heated in their 
own sealed-foil wrapping," she said. "While they are warming, prepare your 
fros tings and other decorations." 

The grapefruit or oranges may be served plain, with side dishes, trays or 
lazy-susan of honey, mint jelly or other syrups for those who liked them sweetened, 
or may be topped with the sweetener and broiled before serving hot. 

She offered recipes for Grecian Feast Bread, Russian Kulich, and Viennes 

Striesel, all of which can be made from the same basic sweet dough. 

BASIC SWEET DOUGH 

1 package active dry yeast or * % cup sugar 

1 cake compressed yeast 1 teaspoon salt 

% cup warm (not hot) water 2 tablespoons melted shortening 

% cup milk 2 3/4 to 3 cups sifted flour 

1 egg 

Dissolve yeast in warm water. Scald milk. Pour into large mixing bowl. Add sugar, 
salt and shortening. Cool. Stir in one cup flour. Mix in dissolved yeast. Add 
egg and beat thoroughly. Add 1% cups flour and mix thoroughly. Turn out on floured 
bread board or pastry cloth and knead, adding remaining flour as needed to make a 
soft dough. ICnead until dough is smooth and satiny. Shape into a smooth ball, press 
into greased bowl and grease top lightly. Cover and let rise until doubled in size, 
about 2 hours. Punch down. Cover again and let rise 5 to 10 minutes. 



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GRECIAIT FEAST BREAD 



1 recipe Basic Sweet Dough 

\ cup currants 

3/4 cup confectioners' sugar 



1 tablespoon milk or cream 

15 blanched almonds 

% eup sliced candied cherries 



Stir currants into Basic Sweet Dough before mixing in last cup of flour. After 
second rising of dough, divide it into three equal parts and shape into smooth balls, 
Place on lightly greased baking dish to form a three-leaf clover, placing balls 
\ inch apart. Cover and let rise about 1 hour. Bake in moderate oven (350°) 40 to 
45 minutes. Cool on rack. Mix confectioners 1 sugar and milk or cream for a soft 
frosting. When bread is cool pour frosting over each loaf, allowing it to drip 
down sides. Arrange almonds and sliced cherries in three-petalled flower shape on 
frosting. To serve cut in thin slices. 



RUSSIAN KULICH 



1 recipe Basic Sweet Dough 

% cup raisins 

% cup chopped almonds 

1 teaspoon grated lemon rind 



% cup sifted confectioners' sugar 
2 teaspoons top milk or cream 
2 tablespoons slivered almonds 
2 candied cherries, sliced 



Stir raisins, almonds and lemon rind into sweet dough before mixing in last cup of 
flour. After second rising of dough divide into halves and shape into balls. Press 
each ball into a greased one-pint fruit or juice can or a one-pound coffee or 
shortening can. Cover and let rise about \\ hours. Bake in moderate over (350©) 
30 to 35 minutes. Turn out on rack to cool. Mix sugar and milk or cream to make 
smooth thin frosting. Four over tops of cooled loaves. Decorate with almonds and 
sliced cherries. To serve cut slices from top to bottom. 



VIENNESE STRIESEL 

1 recipe Basic Sweet Dough 
% cup seedless raisins 
% cup chopped candied cherries 

2 tablespoons chopped candied orange rind 



1/C teaspoon mace 

\ cup confectioners* sugar 

1 tablespoon top milk or cream 

\ cup chopped nuts 



Stir raisins, cherries, orange rind and mace into sweet dough before mixing in the 
last cup of flour. After second rising, divide into nine pieces, shaping each into 
a ball. Cover for five minutes. Roll each piece in the hands to form a strand 
about 15 inches long. Lay four strands on a lightly greased baking sheet, overlappin; 
them at the center. Braid lightly from the center toward each end. Press gently 
to form a depression or "trench" down the center of the braid. Braid three strands 
loosely and lay in the "trench," Finally, twist the two remaining strands together 
and lay on top of the loaf, tucking the ends of the twist under the ends of the loaf. 
Cover and let rise about 1% hours. Bake in moderate oven (350°) 40 to 45 minutes. 
Cool on rack, When cool, spread with frosting of confectioners 1 sugar and milk 
or cream, then sprinkle with nuts. 



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From Bill Lyons UJ' C i l ' 11-16-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 'S* / 

Carbondale, Illinois , i ^ 

Phone: 453-2276 M Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — It's rank foolishness to credit the Russian 10-year 
school system, teaching physics in the sixth grade, with producing Sputnik, 
Dr. George S. Counts told Carbondale Rotarians at their luncheon meeting in 
observance of National Education Week. "The school system wasn't perfected until 
the 1940 's and those students hadn't had time when Sputnik appeared to invent 
anything. " 

Counts, termed America's foremost authority on Russian education, is a visiting 
professor at Southern Illinois. A frequent visitor to Russia, in 1929 he toured 
6,000 miles in the country via Model A Ford, studying schools and systems. He is 
the author of 29 books on Russian education. 

Counts said Russia's progress in nuclear science and rocketry stems largely 
from three factors often overlooked by Americans: 

1. Russia has always been a backward nation but in the 19th century it 
developed a hard corps of true intellectuals, the equal to any in the world, not 
only in the fields of music and literature but also in science. 

2 # The communist organization envelops the word "science" with an aura of 
sanctity comparable to the word "religion" in our country. 

3. The communist political system, with practically all power vested in the 
central committee, is able to marshal all available resources, both personnel and 
material, to achieve its goals, without consulting the people, 

"Russian education is aimed at preparing the mass of the people to blindly 
follow orders issued by the Communist Party," Counts said. "The American system 
attempts to give the ordinary person sufficient knowledge so he can pass informed 
judgement upon great issues. This is a terrible responsibility and American 
educators are striving mightily to live up to the task. It is many times greater 
than the task of the Russian teachers, whose pupils don't have to be prepared to 
make decisions of social policy. That is done by the party," 

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The Corbondale Rotorion 

irbondalc Rotary Club Meets Every Wednesday Noon at the Elks Club 

Charter Club No. 743 - May I, 1920 



Vol, 5 No. 20 November 17, 1962 



CHRISTMAS PARTY PLANS are the headline news for this week's edition of the Scandal 
Sheet (temporarily back under the old management because Brother Clayton left town 
before word could get around of his appointment to the city Plan and Zoning Commission) 
Col, Mac says the party will be the biggest entertainment and fellowship bargain ever 
purchased with three, one dollar bills, which is a sneaky way of introducing the price 
Naturally, you will want to bring the Rotary Ann, and the University Center accepts 
only coin of the realm--no buttons, cigar coupons or I0U*s--so be prepared. Just look 
at what the dollars will buy: 

A ROAST BEEF BANQUET . Bob Vokac says some Rotarians may still be chewing on Thanks- 
giving turkey come Dec. 13, so roast beef should be a welcome change. It will be 
served in the University Center banquet hall, starting at 6:30 p.m. 

FELLOWSHIP with Brother Rotarians from the Murphysboro and Herrin clubs, which 
informed sources tell us were sponsored by the Carbondale club something less than 
a hundred years ago. It will be a true Tri-Club party. 

ENTERTAINMENT by talented members of SIU's international set, foreign students from 
21 nations who will be our Christmas Party guests and respond with songs and dances 
of their native lands. 

ALL OF THIS for a measly three bucks. Col. Mac and his committee members, Ralph 
Bushee, Frank Klingberg, Herb Settle, Bob Vokac and Charles Pulley, have the tickets 
and would like a count this week on how many are coming. Don't forget your guests, 
or some international student who is not taking part in the program but would like 
to enjoy American Christmas season hospitality. Incidentally, there will be no 
regular Rotary meeting on Dec. 12 and we suppose there will be a slight adjustment 
in the quarterly meal fees. MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS! 

LAST WEEK we heard a clear, concise account of Russia's educational system and how 
come the Soviets were able to produce a Sputnik. At the risk of over-simplifying 
Dr. George S. Counts' excellent discussion, we will say the present day Reds didn't 
do the job by teaching physics in sixth grade but by building upon the research of 
their 19th century scientists and harnessing all the energies of the nation to the 
single task, to the exclusion of all else. Actually, the Russians were a long time 
building Sputnik. According to the New York Times the Russians started "on the march" 
in 1865, at about the same time Lincoln was accused of Russian sympathies because he 
followed the czar's lead in liberation proclamations. And who would have thought the 



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The Carbondale Rotarian 

arbl ,ndale Rotary Club Meets Every Wednesday Noon at ^ E|k$ c|ub 

Charter Club No. 743 - May I, 1920 



Vol. 5 No. 20 November 17, 1962 



CHRISTMAS P ARTY PLANS are the headline news for this week's edition of the Scandal 
Sheet (temporarily back under the old management because Brother Clayton left town 
before word could get around of his appointment to the city Plan and Zoning Commission) 
Col. Mac says the party will be the biggest entertainment and fellowship bargain ever 
purchased with three, one dollar bills, which is a sneaky way of introducing the price 
Naturally, you will want to bring the Rotary Ann, and the University Center accepts 
only coin of the realm--no buttons, cigar coupons or IOU's--so be prepared. Just look 
at what the dollars will buy: 

A ROAST BEEF BANQUET. Bob Vokac says some Rotarians may still be chewing on Thanks- 
giving turkey come Dec. 13, so roast beef should be a welcome change. It will be 
served in the University Center banquet hall, starting at 6:30 p.m. 

FELLOWSHIP with Brother Rotarians from the Murphysboro and Herrin clubs, which 
informed sources tell us were sponsored by the Carbondale club something less than 
a hundred years ago. It will be a true Tri-Club party. 

ENTERTAINMENT by talented members of SIU's international set, foreign students from 
21 nations who will be our Christinas Party guests and respond with songs and dances 
of their native lands. 

ALL OF THIS for a measly three bucks. Col. Mac and his committee members, Ralph 
Bushee, Frank Klingberg, Herb Settle, Bob Vokac and Charles Pulley, have the tickets 
and would like a count this week on how many are coming. Don't forget your guests, 
or some international student who is not taking part in the program but would like 
to enjoy American Christmas season hospitality. Incidentally, there will be no 
regular Rotary meeting on Dec. 12 and we suppose there will be a slight adjustment 
in the quarterly meal fees. MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS! 

LAST WEEK we heard a clear, concise account of Russia's educational system and how 
come the Soviets were able to produce a Sputnik. At the risk of over-simplifying 
Dr. George S. Counts' excellent discussion, we will say the present day Reds didn't 
do the job by teaching physics in sixth grade but by building upon the research of 
their 19th century scientists and harnessing all the energies of the nation to the 
single task, to the exclusion of all else. Actually, the Russians were a long time 
building Sputnik. According to the New York Times the Russians started "on the march" 
In 1865, at about the same time Lincoln was accused of Russian sympathies because he 
followed the czar's lead in liberation proclamations. And who would have thought the 
Russians produced the perfect example of "progressive education" in the 1920' s, when 
the children ran the schools and dictated to the teachers. 

GUESTS LAST WEEK were Bernadlne Greer and Tyler Young, representing Attucks High 
School and introduced by their principal and Rotarian, John Q. Clark. ..Carl Weigand 
got about three-quarters of the way 'round the mulberry bush with the answer to his 
question-- "with whom did I ride to Rotary meeting two weeks ago?" We didn't learn if 
he got the rest of the way by finding his missing manila folder... Rev. Thompson, 
senior active from Newcastle, Ind., filling the pulpit at the Christian Church here, 
has a story to top all coincidence stories. Seems he was attending a church meeting 
in New York City a few years ago and was standing in front of the hotel with a group 
of four or five other delegates. He mentioned he was from Newcastle, Ind. Another 
of the group spoke up: "My home is at Newcastle, Pa." A third man chimed in: "and 
my home is Newcastle, England. "...Clayton will return from Tulsa, Okla., as soon as 
President Tom telephones him that the hue and cry over his appointment to the city 
Plan Commission has died down and It is safe... Bill Lyons is in St. Louis but has 
guaranteed his four bird dogs he'll be back home in time for the season opener 
Saturday noon... Secretary Jim says he'll find needle and thread to sew the newest 
crop of banners from far places onto the blue shields that grace the east wall of tha 
meeting place. 

NEW MEMBER Gordon C. Estes reports via the Rotarian to the secretary that his address 
Is 201 California, Carterville and that he is associated with the Carbondale Home 
Lumber Co. 

THIS SPACE IS YOURS FOR LISTING GROCERIES AND OTHER IMPORTANT NOTATIONS. 



Service Of dove Self- 3te (Profits Jliost Offw Serves JJest 



CARBONDALE ROTARY CLUB — 1962-63 



VICE-PRESIDENT 

Max Sappenfield 



GOVERNOR DIST. 651 PRESIDENT 

Norman Beck Tom Easterly 

DIRECTORS: Frank Gumm, Ken Miller, Max Sappenfield, Bob Vokac 
PAST DISTRICT GOVERNOR: Lester Webb PAST PRESIDENT: Harry Goldstein 



CLUB SERVICE 

Max Sappenfield, Director 
ATTENDANCE 

Bryan Kimmel, Chairman 
CLASSIFICATION 

Carl Brrkholz, Chairman 
CLUB BULLETIN 

Bill Lyons, Chairman 
FELLOWSHIP - . 
SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 

John Q. Clark, Chairman 
MAGAZINE - 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Roye Bryant, Chairman 
MEMBERSHIP 

Clyde Winkler, Chairman 
PROGRAM 

Max Sappenfield, Chairman 
AUDITING 

W. B. Crane, Jr., Chairman 
MUSIC 

George Hand, Chairman 
LEGISLATION 

Herb Settle, Chairman 
HISTORY 

John Allen, Chairman 



Name Nickname 

Abbott, Talbert W. (Abbott) 
Adams, George W. (George) 
Armstrong, John M. (John) 
Birkholz, Carl K. (Carl) 
Bryant, Roye R. (Roye) 
Budslick, William (Bill) 
Bushee, Ralph W. (Ralph) 
Campisi, Paul J. (Paul) 
Clark, John Q. (John) 
Clayton, Charles C. (Charley) 
Crane, William B., Jr. (Bill) 
Crocker, D. R. (Don) 
Curtis, Harry C. (Harry) 
Easterly, Thomas A: (Tom) 
Eddings, W. L. (Tinner) i 
Feirich, Charles E. (Charley) 
Fisher, Harvey I. (Harvey) 
Frazer, C. A. (C.A.) 
Gallington, Ralph O. (Ralph) 
Goldstein, Harry S. (Golde) 
Gray, Ralph (Ralph) 
Gumm, Frank L. (Frank) '• • • 
Hamblen, John W. (John) 
Hand, George H. (George) 
Hoffman, 'Paul M. (Paul) 
Hosley, Neil W. (Neil) 
Joseph, R. C. (Joe) 
Keith, Malcolm Robert (Bob) 
Kimmel, Bryan (Bryan) 
Kimmel, Philip (Phip) 
Klingberg, Frank L. (Frank) 
Koonce, Harry (Harry) 
Lee, W. D. (Doug) 
Long, Howard R. (H.R.) • 
Lyons, William H. (Bill) 
MacMillan, Alexander R. (Mac) 



COMMITTEES 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Jim Mowry ■ 



. 



VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

Frank Gumm, Director 
BUYER-SELLER- 
COMPETITOR-RELATIONS 

Henry J. Rehn, Chairman 
EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE 
RELATIONS 

Curt Mann, Chairman 
FOUR WAY TEST & 
COMMUNITY 
GOVERNMENT 

Mason Parker, Chairman 
OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Neil Hosley, Chairman 



COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Kenneth Miller, Director 

YOUTH 

Paul Hoffman, Chairman 
COMMUNITY SAFETY 

James Wallace, Chairman 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Don Crocker, Chairman 
SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS & 
STUDENT LOANS 

Frank Klingberg, Chairman 
STUDENT GUESTS 

Chuck Southard, Chairman 
INTER-SERVICE 
CLUB MEETINGS 

A. R. MacMillan, Chairman 



INTERNATIONAL SERVICE 

Robert Vokac, Director 
INTERNATIONAL 
CONTACTS 

Howard Long, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Paul Campisi, Chairman 
ROTARY FOUNDATION 

Wilis Swartz, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
STUDENT PROJECTS 

Ralph Bushee, Chairman 

- 



■ 



, . 






• 






• 



ROSTER 



Membership or Classification 

Senior Active 

Edu. — History 

Gas & Oil Wholesaling 

Art Goods ■ — Retailing 

Senior Active 

Motor Courts 

Edu. — Library 

Edu. — Sociology 

Edu. — High School Principal 

Edu. — Journal Publishing 

Accounting Service . 

Christianity — Prostestantism 

Senior Active 

Decorating materials — Retailing : 

Heating Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Zoology 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Industrial Education 

Men's Furnishings — Retailing • 

Real Estate Agency 

Associations — YMCA Director 

Edu. — Computing Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Marketing 

Edu. — Forestry 

R.R. Transp. — Dispatching 

Plastics — Mfg. 

Petroleum — ■ Production 

Taxi Service 

Edu. — Government. . .; • 

R.R. Transp. — Div. Supt. 

Television — Service 

Edu. — Journalism 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — - Transportation 



Name Nickname 

Mann, Curt F. (Curt) 
Mars, John T. (John) 
McKeefery, William J. (Bill) 
McRoy, Paul F., (Paul) 
Miller, Kenneth R. (Ken) . 
Mowry, James B. (Jim) 
Murray, Glen H. (Glen) 
Murrie, B. J. (B.J.) 
Nagel, William E. (Bill) 
Neunlist, Dempsey V. (D.V.) 
Parker, H. M. (Mason) 
Parrish, Carl A. (Cap) 
Parrish, Gordon A. (Gordon) 
Pulley, Charles (Charles) 
Rehn, Henry J. (Henry) 
Renfro, Louis F. (L.F.) . 
Sappenfield, Max M. (Max) 
Sederlin, Elvin L. (E.L.) 
Semar, Preston 
Setde, Herbert B. (Herb) , 
Southard, Charles (Chuck) 
Stafford, Eugene (Gene) 
Swartz, Willis G. (Bill) 
Swick, Ralph D. (Ralph) 
Veath, Irose J. (I. J.) 
Vokac, Robert B. (Bob) 
Wiegand, G. Carl (Carl) 
Winkler, Clyde V. (Clyde) , 
Allen, John W. (John) 
Davis, Robert W., (Bob) 
Dill, John D. .(John) 
Hodge, John R. (John) 
Jordon. Roy V. (Roy) 
Lentz, E. G. (Gib) < 

Smith, Clyde L. (Clyde) 



Membership or Classification 

Men's Clothing — Retailing 

Banking — Savings 

Edu. — Admin. Acad. Affairs 

Broadcasting Services 

Edu. — University Admin." 

Horticulture — Research 

House Furniture — Retailing 

Building Construction 

Edu. — Tech. Adult Edu. 

Comercial Photography 

Elec. Light & Power Service 

Insurance — Life 

Milk — Distributing 

Edu. — - Architectural Service 

Edu. — School of Business 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Government 

Public Health 

Loans — Auto Financing 

Highway Eng. Utilities 

rZtiu. — Student Counseling 

ln's. — Health and Hospital 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Accounting 

Sporting Goods — Retailing 

Edu. — Placements 

Edu. — Economics 

Past Service 

Honorary 

Honorary ' 

Honorary 

Honorary . 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 



' 



" 



No. 452 November 17, 1962 

S, I. B. A. H E W S L I T T E R 

ROSES AND GIANT BEGONIAS to Roy Clippinger, CARMI TIMES, who was so determined to vote 
that he was hauled from his sick bed to the polling place by ambulance and carried 
inside* •• If only more citizens cared a fraction as much for the privilege that is 
theirs • 

MORE ROSES to Sybil (Mrs. Joe) Davison, CHRISTOPHER PROGRESS, chosen one of seven 
"Career Women of the Year 11 at the career conference held here by the district Business 
and Professional Women's Clubs. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of 
Journalism, Sybil is listed in Who's Who in American Women and Who's Who in the 
Midwest,., In her spare time she is the mother of five (5,4,3,2 and 10 months) and 
cooks for Joe, 

FROM THE GREAT BEYOND . Pierre, S # D., Don Hecke sends samples of the PIERRE STATE NEtB, 
morning daily, and the REMINDER, weekly shopper, both offset •• .Already Don is trying 
to stir things up a bit—for the common good, of course. Wants to merge the Chamber 
of Commerce of Pierre and Ft. Pierre, across the river. That Hecke, now in the midst 
of deer, grouse and pheasant country, probably won't fire a shot •• .The NEWS is on sale 
at 76 news stands.. .The Bar JZ— that's a ranch, son— is advertising its annual white- 
face sale, ..And one of the items in a page 1 ear reports that fishing is good,, .Don't 
know if Don found the offset foreman he wanted •• .At the suggestion of Vachel Davis, 
the "coal miner artist," Eldorado, Governor Kerner has designated Jan, 6 as Carl 
Sandburg Day, it says here. 

RAY JOHNS EN . TROY TRIBUNE, has responded with amazing promptness to our request for 
highlights of the year abroad from which Ray and family returned a few weeks ago. 
Here is the story: "About two years ago, my wife and I decided to do something we 
had always dreamed of doing. Since I had taught before coming to Troy and also for 
four years part-time while running the Tribune, I began to get "itchy" to return to 
the classroom. 

"But instead of just any classroom, my wife and I decided to consider England. 

"After considerable correspondence we were offered a position at the Stratford- 
upon-Avon High School for Girls. 

"Almost before we realized it, we had sold our home, stored our furniture, and 
were on board the Queen Elizabeth, sailing for Europe. 

"ENGLAND is beautiful. It is green, well-kept and interesting. To say that 
England is a living history book is overshadowed only by the feeling that William 
Shakespeare actually "comes alive" at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford. We 
had no central heating, no television, no telephone, no refrigerator and other "things" 
but they were hardly missed as we found ourselves enjoying walks, nature, books and 
other important things that we so often take for granted here in our abundance. 
During the three months we had a car, we practically "ran the tires off" (on the left 
side, of course) as we covered historic spots such as the place where Gray wrote his 
"Elegy", the pretty meads where King John signed the Magna Charta and the Bloody 
Tower in the Tower of London where heads rolled at the drop of an ax. 

"Our two children enjoyed the English schools and loved their experience. The 
English educational system is interesting and different. For the sake of brevity, 
I'll say three very important characteristics of their system are their 1) ungraded 
primary classes, 2) their testing system to determine which secondary school the 
student should attend and 3) the testing system to show achievement in various subjects. 
Needless to say, the people in England are very "education-conscious." 

"England was also a convenient spot from which to tour the continent and the 
Middle East, and we took advantage of it. 

Compiled by Information Service, Southern Illinois University, for the Southern 
Illinois Editorial Association, the Newslitter is made possible because of the extent 
to which area editors include Information Service on their mailing lists. 

-more- 



CARBONDALE ROTARY CLUB — 1962-63 

VICE-PRESIDENT 
Max Sappen field 



GOVERNOR DIST. 651 PRESIDENT 

Norman Beck Tom Easterly 

DIRECTORS: Frank Gumm, Ken Miller, Max Sappenfield, Bob Vokac 
PAST DISTRICT GOVERNOR: Lester Webb PAST PRESIDENT: Harry Goldstein 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 
Jim Mowry - 



' .! 



CLUB SERVICE 

Max Sappenfield, Director 
ATTENDANCE 

Bryan Kimmel, Chairman 
CLASSIFICATION 

Carl Birkholz, Chairman 
CLUB BULLETIN 

Bill Lyons, Chairman 
FELLOWSHIP - 
SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 

John Q. Clark, Chairman 
MAGAZINE - 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Roye Bryant. Chairman 
MEMBERSHIP 

Clyde Winkler, Chairman 
PROGRAM 

Max Sappenfield, Chairman 
AUDITING 

W. B. Crane, Jr., Chairman 
MUSIC 

George Hand, Chairman 
LEGISLATION 

Herb Settle, Chairman 
HISTORY 

John Allen, Chairman 



Name Nickname 

Abbott, Talbert W. (Abbott) 
Adams, George W. (George) 
Armstrong, John M. (John) 
Birkholz, Car) K. (Carl) 
Bryant, Roye R. (Roye) 
Budslick, William (Bill) 
Bushee, Ralph W. (Ralph) 
Campisi. Paul J. (Paul) . 
Clark, John Q. (John) 
Clayton, Charles C. (Charley) 
Crane, William B., Jr. (Bill) 
Crocker, D. R. (Don) 
Curtis, Harry C. (Harry) . 
Easterly, Thomas A. (Tom) 
Eddings, W. L. (Tinner) ! 
Feirich, Charles E. (Charley) 
Fisher, Harvey I. (Harvey) 
Frazer, C. A. (C.A.) 
Gallington, Ralph O. (Ralph) 
Goldstein, Harry S. (Golde) 
Gray, Ralph (Ralph) 
Gumm, Frank L. (Frank) • ■ ■ 
Hamblen, John W. (John) 
Hand, George H. (George) 
Hoffman, 'Paul M. (Paul) 
Hosley, Neil W. (Neil) 
Joseph, R. C. (Joe) 
Keith, Malcolm Robert (Bob) 
Kimmel, Bryan (Bryan) 
Kimmel, Philip (Phip) 
Klingberg, Frank L. (Frank) 
Koonce, Harry (Harry) 
Lee, W. D. (Doug) 
Long, Howard R. (H.R.) 
Lyons, William H. (Bill) 



VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

Frank Gumm, Director 
BUYER-SELLER- 
COMPETITOR-RELATIONS 

Henry J. Rehn, Chairman 
EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE 
RELATIONS 

Curt Mann, Chairman 
FOUR WAY TEST & 
COMMUNITY 
GOVERNMENT 

Mason Parker, Chairman 
OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Neil Hosley, Chairman 



COMMITTEES 

COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Kenneth Miller, Director 
YOUTH 

Paul Hoffman, Chairman 
COMMUNITY SAFETY 

James -Wallace, Chairman 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN . 

Don Crocker, Chairman 






INTERNATIONAL SERVICE 

Robert Vokac, Director 
INTERNATIONAL 
CONTACTS 

Howard Long, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Paul Campisi, Chairman 



SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS & ROTARY FOUNDATION 



■ 



i < 



STUDENT LOANS 

Frank Klingberg, Chairman 
STUDENT GUESTS 

Chuck Southard, Chairman 
INTER-SERVICE 
CLUB MEETINGS 

A. R. MacMillan, Chairman 



Wilis Swartz, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
STUDENT PROJECTS 

Ralph Bushee, Chairma 






i 



ROSTER 



Membership or Classification 

Senior Active 

Edu. — History 

Gas & Oil Wholesaling 

Art Goods , — Retailing 

Senior Active 

Motor Courts 

Edu. — Library 

Edu. — Sociology 

Edu. — High School Principal 

Edu. — Journal Publishing 

Accounting Service 

Christianity — Prostestantism 

Senior Active 

Decorating materials — Retailing '■' 

Heating Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Zoology 

Edu. — Info-. Serv. 

Edu. — Industrial Education 

Men's Furnishings — Retailing 

Real Estate Agency 

Associations — YMCA Director 

Edu. — Computing Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Marketing 

Edu.- — Forestry 

R.R. Transp. — Dispatching 

Plastics — Mfg. 

Petroleum — Production 

Taxi Service 

Edu. — Government 

R.R. Transp. — Div. Supt. 

Television — Service 

Edu. — Journalism 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 



MacMillan, Alexander R. (Mac) Edu. — Transportation 



AREA ROTARY MEETINGS— 



Name Nickname 

.Mann, Curt F. (Curt) 
Mars, John T. (John) 
McKeefery, William J. (Bill) 
McRoy, Paul F.,(Paul> . , 
Miller, Kenneth R. (Ken) . 
Mowry, James B. (Jim) 
Murray, Glen H. (Glen) 
Murrie, B. J. (B.J.) . 
Nagel, William E. (Bill) 
Neunlist, Dempsey V. (D.V.) 
Parker, H. M. (Mason) 
Parrish, Carl A. (Cap) 
Parrish, Gordon A. (Gordon) 
Pulley, Charles (Charles) 
Rehn, Henry J. (Henry) 
Renfro, Louis F. (L.F.) , 
Sappenfield, Max M. (Max) 
Sederlin, Elvin L. (E.L.) 
Semar, Preston 
Settle, Herbert B. (Herb) 
Southard, Charles (Chuck)' 
Stafford, Eugene (Gene) 
Swartz, Willis G. (Bill) 
Swick, Ralph D. (Ralph) 
Veath, Irose J. (I. J.) 
Vokac, Robert B. (Bob) 
Wiegand, G. Carl (Carl) I 
Winkler, Clyde V. (Clyde) , i 
Allen, John W. (John) 
Davis, Robert W., (Bob) 
Dill, John D. .(John) ; 
Hodge, John R. (John), i 
Jordon. Roy V. (Roy)' 
Lentz, E. G. (Gib) 
Smith. Clyde L. (Clyde) - 
| 

■ : 



Membership or Classification 

Men's Clothing — Retailing 

Banking — 'Savings 

Edu. — Admin. Acad. Affairs 

Broadcasting Services 

Edu.— University Admin;- 

Horticulture — Research 

House Furniture — Retailing 

Building Construction 

Edu. — Tech. Adult Edu. 

Comercial Photography 

Elec. Light & Power Service 

Insurance — .Life 

Milk — Distributing 

Edu. — Architectural Service 

Edu. — School of Business 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Government 

Public Health 

Loans — Auto Financing 

Highway Eng. Utilities 

Edu. — Student Counseling 

Iris. — Health and Hospital 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Accounting 

Sporting Goods — Retailing 

Edu. — Placements 

Edu. — Economics 

Past Service, 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 



Honorary . 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 



. 






• 



Monday Noon — Centralia, Harrisburg, Herrin, New Athens, O'Fallori 

Monday Evening — Cairo, Chester, Cisne, Columbia, Freeburg, Golconda, Mt. Carmel, Olney, Pinckneyville, W. Salem 

Tuesday Noon — Albion, Belleville, Chicago, Eldorado, Mt. Vernon, Urbana, West Frankfort 

Tuesday Evening — Benton, Carmi, DtiQuoin, Flora. Murphysboro, Sparta. Waterloo, Wayne City 

Wednesday Noon — Carbondale, East St. Louis, Johnston City, Lebanon ' . ' 

Thursday Noon — Anna, Carlyle, Fairfield, LawrenceviIIe, Marion, Metropolis, St. Louis 

Thursday Evening — Marissa, Mascoutah, Nashville, Zeigler 

Friday Noon — LouisvHfc Salem 

Friday Evening — Crossville, Millstadt 



No, 452 November 1?, 1962 

S. I. B. A. N E W S L I T T E R 

ROSES AND GIANT BEGONIAS to Roy Clippinger, CARMI TIMES, who was so determined to vote 
that he was hauled from his sick bed to the polling place by ambulance and carried 
inside... If only more citizens cared a fraction as much for the privilege that is 
theirs • 

MORE ROSES to Sybil (Mrs. Joe) Davison, CHRISTOPHER PROGRESS, chosen one of seven 
"Career Women of the Year 11 at the career conference held here by the district Business 
and Professional Women's Clubs . A graduate of the university of Missouri School of 
Journalism, Sybil is listed in Uho's Who in American Women and Who's Who in the 
Midwest, ..In her spare time she is the mother of five (5,4,3,2 and 10 months) and 
cooks for Joe. 

FROM THE GREAT BEYOND . Pierre, S # D., Don Hecke sends samples of the PIERRE STATE NEWS, 
morning daily, and the REMINDER, weekly shopper, both offset •••Already Don is trying 
to stir things up a bit—for the common good, of course* Wants to merge the Chamber 
of Commerce of Pierre and Ft. Pierre, across the river . That Hecke, now in the midst 
of deer, grouse and pheasant country, probably won't fire a shot •••The NEWS is on sale 
at 76 news stands •••The Bar JZ— that's a ranch, son— is advertising its annual white- 
face sale... And one of the items in a page 1 ear reports that fishing is good... Don't 
know if Don found the offset foreman he wan ted... At the suggestion of Vachel Davis , 
the "coal miner artist," Eldorado, Governor Kernel* has designated Jan* 6 as Carl 
Sandburg Day, it says here* 

RAY JOHNS EN . TROY TRIBUNE, has responded with amazing promptness to our request for 
highlights of the year abroad from which Ray and family returned a few weeks ago. 
Here is the story: "About two years ago, my wife and I decided to do something we 
had always dreamed of doing. Since I had taught before coming to Troy and also for 
four years part-time while running the Tribune, I began to get "itchy" to return to 
the classroom. 

"But instead of just any classroom, my wife and I decided to consider England. 

"After considerable correspondence we were offered a position at the Stratford- 
upon-Avon High School for Girls. 

"Almost before we realized it, we had sold our home, stored our furniture, and 
were on board the Queen Elizabeth, sailing for Europe, 

"ENGLAND is beautiful. It is green, well-kept and interesting. To say that 
England is a living history book is overshadowed only by the feeling that William 
Shakespeare actually "comes alive" at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford. We 
had no central heating, no television, no telephone, no refrigerator and other "things" 
but they were hardly missed as we found ourselves enjoying walks, nature, books and 
other important things that we so often take for granted here in our abundance. 
During the three months we had a car, we practically "ran the tires off" (on the left 
side, of course) as we covered historic spots such as the place where Gray wrote his 
"Elegy", the pretty meads where Ring John signed the Magna Charta and the Bloody 
Tower in the Tower of London where heads rolled at the drop of an ax. 

"Our two children enjoyed the English schools and loved their experience. The 
English educational system is interesting and different* For the sake of brevity, 
I'll say three very important characteristics of their system are their 1) ungraded 
primary classes, 2) their testing system to determine which secondary school the 
student should attend and 3) the testing system to show achievement in various subjects. 
Needless to say, the people in England are very "education-conscious." 

"England was also a convenient spot from which to tour the continent and the 
Middle East, and we took advantage of it. 

. . _ <*Rk«w*"«i°tt"f"AM"rA" 

Compiled by Information Service, Southern Illinois university, for the Southern 
Illinois Editorial Association, the Newslitter is made possible because of the extent 
to which area editors include Information Service on their mailing lists* 

-more- 



Page 2 

"FROM OUR year In England and in travelling in various other countries, we make 
these general observations: 1) People in foreign countries are very interested in 
the United States* Time and time again we were asked about the United States' 
position and attitude and thinking on various things. The people of the world are 
well aware of America's place of leadership. 2) In far too many cases, the American 
'image' is not what we would like to have it be* Too often our country is judged by 
our movies, our television and by loud, free-spending, inconsiderate American tourists* 
3) People in other countries think all Americans are rich and have everything they 
want* 'We just can't imagine Americans without a car,' we were told. 4) Poverty is 
very real in the world* Many times, in our abundance, we forget about the less 
privileged people in the world* The look on a young boy's face as he searched for a 
morsel of food in a garbage can in Cairo and seeing the many people in line for food 
in Jerusalem are mental pictures which will not be forgotten* A tremendous number of 
people in the world are in need of real, effective help* 5) All the world's problems 
aren't overseas* An American abroad is hurt and asked often about our delinquency, 
racial segregation, divorce rates, increased crime, etc. 

"Basically, we found ourselves assuming a dual role: One, as sightseers 
enjoying everything from the Parthenon in Athens to a gondola ride in Venice and two, 
as citizens of a world in which many, many people have a difficult time finding 
happiness we enjoy and who live without so many of the things we take for granted. 

PETE MOLLMAN . SIEA vice and publisher of SCENE, was pictured in, yes— SCENE, along 
with Hugh Heffner, editor and publisher of PLAYBOY, and Reed Malloy, SCENE editor... 
This line, among others, was in this St* Louis eatery and entertainment mag*: "I 
think my landlord asks too much for rent* Last month he asked five times."*. .Our 
Rock Island stringer reports a sign in the arsenal which reads, "If this building 
burned today, where would you work tomorrow? "...Dr. E. 0. Melby, Michigan State: 
"We are not complete human beings until it somehow dawns on us that all men are our 
brothers*" 

TIM TURNER . HARRISBURG REGISTER, reports a reader with a hoof mark on the hood of his 
car— made by a hurdling deer over near Pounds Hollow Lake. ..Mrs* E. J. Kearney who 
writes an "Around Town" column for Ron Dragoset, BLUFFS TIMES, is going to string 
from California for about four weeks. ..Ron borrows from Kipling to pay tribute to 
Paul Vannier as a "first class fighting man.. .full of sand and ginger (we've always 
wondered) who did so much to make Bluffs and Meredosia better places in which to 
live..." 

ANDY ANDERSON . EDWARDSVILLE INTELLIGENCER, suggested editorially that the least the 
city council could do would be to pay the 50 bucks dues so the Edwardsville mayor 
could belong to the Southwest Council of Mayors, a Madison-St. Clair organization... 
Walter Winchell Fricke says he hasn't made much money writing the "Keyhole" column 
30 years for the NOKOMIS FREE PRESS- PROGRESS but that he has had fun*. '.'about as much 
fun as being a bus driver •"*.. He tells of the fellox* who wouldn't say grace over a 
meal of leftovers "because everything here has been blessed before." 

CAL REYNOLDS in Winifred Armstrong's LAWRENCEvTLLE DAILY RECORD quotes a city council- 
man's comment on an audit, "It cost us $200 to find out we owe $500 on back social 
security"..* It was at the same meeting that the council purchased upholstered swivel 
chairs for all members ... If some segregationists had to bomb a church, why did they 
have to pick the "High Hope" church in Georgia Instead of the "Little Hope" church in 
Virginia? 

ART ALLEN . CLAY COUNTY ADVOCATE, carries an ad which hints strongly that a poodle is 
a stupid dog. This may be true— but there will be letters ••• *The father of Dee 
Schmitt, MACOUPIN COUNTY ENQUIRER, was a Pennsylvania farmer, it says here... Everyone 
in Carlinville turned their clocks back October 28 except the guy who sounds the 
noon siren*. *,Reiher and Phelps, CARLINVILLE DEMOCRAT had an exceptionally good head- 
on picture of a corn picker in action* 

-more- 



Page 3 

HAVING an errand in Cairo, we took a short cut by way of Carterville and Vy-enna. It 
was the day after election, and Dave Saunders, although about to be initiated into 
SDX, was a bit uneasy. • ."Did Paul (Simon) win?" he wanted to know. . • ' Vhat ' 8 the 
difference?" we countered. "He can always make a living." "The difference is," said 
Dave, "if he didn't win, he might go back to running the paper at Troy, another shift 
or two might be made, and I might be out of a job"..."Ah..., are there any openings 
at SIU?" chimed in Mrs. Hampton, the woman who, as in every front office, really does 
the work. "I might be looking, too." 

SQ WE HURRIED to Vienna, ate a snack at Ned's Shed, where you don't need to ask for 
a spoon because they are in a jar on the counter, and proceeded to the local mint 
where we had heard there might be labor trouble— the trouble being that Ruth 
Trovillion's husband is considering a job in another community, and, like as not, Ruth 
will go with him.. .She is Squire Bridges' "No. 1 boy", and her leaving would be as 
much of a blow as if your top female— maybe your wife— walked out... Arriving at the 
mint a few minutes before 1 p.m., when the pressman was on telephone duty, we awaited 
with pleasure the sight of the harem members trooping back to their toil. • .Ruth was 
first. She reasons that she should leave with her husband because they have been 
married 17 years, while she has slaved for Royce only 14 years, her mate thus having 
prior claim... Mary Henard came next, then Ruth Ann Scogeins and Zona Bridges— filling 
in for Helen Schwarzentraub (we spelled it, try to pronounce it) who had taken her 
mate to Mexico on vacation. • .Zona was about to do battle with the single wraps but 
stated frankly that she could not even hope to approach the wrapping speed of one-time 
world's champion Mrs. Bob Mueller of Ramsey fame. 

HAVING COMMENTED in previous issues on "High Hope" and "Little Hope" Baptist churches, 
it is only fair to note that near the Lick Creek turnoff is a sign directing 
worshippers to a Baptist meeting house called "New Hope," which is sort of refreshing 
•••Getting back to the Squire, we knew Wednesday was not the day to be stopping in, 
but Royce fetched a chair, put his feet on the desk, and urged us to sit a spell, 
explaining that "it's on the press" and that the harem would carry on... Thus we 
learned that Brother Bridges— who was born near Vienna, where his grandfather was a 
blacksmith— spent some boyhood years in Tishomingo, Oklahoma, where his dad and 
Alfalfa Bill Murray worked together as printers* •• .These two even talked of becoming 
partners, but that wouldn't have worked because of their differences in political 
faiths... It is a fact, however, that Alfafa Bill never dreamed that Royce would ever 
own an old 1961 white Cadillac... So we accepted a Corina Lancer, not to be confused 
with one of Sam Little's Black Bombers, and went out on the square where, before we 
could get the car door open, Jess Gurley of Buncombe sold us a dime's worth of turnips 
for a quarter.. .Star ting again for Cairo, we passed "Brown Acres," which were green, 
a reminder of the Green River in Utah, which is brown* • .And if you don't know the 
whereabouts of Buncombe, read again the last chapter in Baker Browns 11' s "The Other 
Illinois." 

TALKING with Martin Brown, who had worked on election returns until 3:20 a.m., was 
downright enlightening.. .The CAIRO EVENING CITIZEN probably worked the High school 
page promotion more extensively than any other area paper last year* Martin reports 
that the response this fall was prompt and enthusiastic* **To save money and time, 
especially time, on election tabulations for Alexander and Pulaski counties forms 
were typed in advance, vote totals inserted, and the returns were printed from 
Fairchild plates... On the Monday prior to the election the CITIZEN carried a page of 
pix and biographical sketches on all candidates of concern to Cairo voters, probably 
a boon to readers who didn't get around to making up their minds until the last 
minute. ..On Tuesday, the CITIZENS' annual hunting edition was printed, including a 
full page map and a listing of all area "commercial" hunting clubs •••One of the many 
features was a grisly one predicting that 3000 hunters in the U. S. would be injured 
and that 500 would die... (Be careful, Huts ).* .Another CITIZEN promotion in full swing 
is a campaign to "Build the Dam Now"--on the Ohio... Somewhere in the visiting we met 
again George Phillips, bookkeeper; Gene Aydt, accountant and part-time photographer, 
who has a son at SIU, and Earl Jewell, orator and ad manager. (more) 



Page 4 

AT MOUNDS we met the PULASKI ENTERPRISE editor Ed Taylor, who owns the only paper in 
Pulaski County and runs a greater variety of legals— -and probably more legals— than 
any other publisher for miles and miles. He has even sold the idea of running a 
personal property delinquent list— which has paid off not only for him but also for 
the county. Ed has another distinction. He's the only publisher we know of who has 
a law degree— and has passed the California bar exam, although he has never practiced. 
But this may explain his interest in legals. He not only sells the space, he also 
WRITES them.. .Perhaps his greatest achievement, however, was bringing Ann Cameron 
"in from the country" about six years ago. Ann is so good now in her job of "utility 
man" that she put out an issue of the paper single-handedly a while back when Ed was 
in the hospital. • .No, she didn't set type or run the press. The Frank Bonds up at 
Dongola handle that part of the work.... Ed and Ann have attended two IPA meetings— 
"wouldn't miss another"— but have never been to an SIEA gathering.,.. Hmmm!.,. Young 
Ed attended the journalism "seminar" for high school students at SIU last summer and 
plans to return next summer. He is a high school junior. 

DIDN'T PAUSE long at Dongola. The Bonds had the TRI-COUNTY PRESS "on the streets" 
but were working like mad on the Pulaski paper •• .After considerable meditation, they 
have agreed to go to 11 or 11% ems on Ed's paper, changing it from six to seven 
columns— possibly may do the same for the PRESS,. .Frank was out picking up final 
figures on election returns. When he came in, we went out. 

AT THE ANNA-GAZETTE-DEMOCRAT . Lewida Reppert was reading LIFE (Adv.) while John 
Vicenzi and his crew, including Jerry Reppert (high school) and Dick Vicenzi (SIU 
senior), were starting the last run (5: 15). ..Helping were Lowell Cooley, Larry Swain, 
Dave Boyd, Jim Mueller and Hobart Earnhart*. .Lewida has 12 full-timers on the payroll. 
...She had hoped to add Jane Nix, the Newton girl mentioned recently in the Newsl., 
but Jane had taken a job the day before with the MATTOON JOURNAL. . .John Reppert, 
senior at Missouri U., has been going hither and thither, including such far-away 
places as Chicago and Detroit, to make speeches to students on his experiences in 
Europe. He will start work on his master's degree next term. ..John wants to come 
back home as editor of the GAZETTE-DEMOCRAT one of these days .. .Jerry is interested 
in the back shop, but Lewida "doesn't know" about Bob, also making quite a record at 
Missouri, He may seek his fortune away from the old home town. ..So we got back late, 
went to part of one meeting and hurried to catch part of the SDX initiation— but 
didn't. 

AN INDIAN whose pride often had been wounded because the government agent had shown 
no genuine interest in him and his people and who invariably was too busy to see him, 
bought a roll top desk and a swivel chair at a sale. When asked what he was going to 
do with them he replied, "I'm going to take them home, and when a government man comes 
I'm going to sit in that chair and put my feet on that desk and say, "This is my busy 
day",,. Humor, junior high style— probably dusted off: "In deep dismay the woodpecker 
wept as the shades of evening stole. He had pecked and pecked and pecked all day at 
a concrete telegraph pole," 

OLD ESTABLISHED WEEKLY newspaper, priced to sell. Owner retiring Jan. 1 after 35 
years. J. Edwin Hoyer, Stewardson, Illinois •• .Ed and Bernice Hoyer have been 
publishing the STEWARDSON CLIPPER since July 10, 1928. The paper was established in 
1887. ..Ed says, "It's a fact we've got a nice set-up for some young person. We've 
been as busy as can be without soliciting business for the last 10 years. Just 
regular repeat work. "...Ed did a mighty thoughtful thing, included a bit of folding 
money with his "for sale" ad. This never has happened before, but we can't risk 
accepting it. • .What if Ed should make a sale as a result of this mention (Don't laugh; 
it has happened twice), and what if it turned out that the fellow who bought the paper 
couldn't pay for it, and what if it were one of the times when there was some month 
left over at the end of our money, and what if about that time Ed decided that running 
an ad in the Newsl. had been a horrible mistake and wanted his thoughtful cash back..? 
Do you get the picture? (more) 



Page 5 

ROSES to SENATOR SIMON . TROY TRIBUNE, Troy's first senator. (Dave Saunders can relax 
now over at Carterville.) You just don't find many publishing senators, but here's 
one who is succeeding one, Senator Jim Monroe, COLLINS VILLE HERALD.... Paul is 
sending a clipping about one of the MENARD TIME staffers who can get out if he has a 
job ...We* 11 mention this now in case we "go to press" before the clip arrives. You 
can check with John File or Warden Randolph at Menard.. .The fact that Dave Saunders 
has overcome many obstacles and made good at Carterville may go a long way toward 
helping "the next guy" to get a job. 

"CAP" FRAZER noticed something in Pana Pauscbert's NEWS-PALLADIUM which we had 
managed to miss through the years unless— we hope— it is rather new. At the top of 
the "Sick and Convalescent" column is a note stating that a copy of each issue of the 
N-P is supplied free to every patient in the local hospital— being provided by two 
attorneys, a lumber company and the N-P... One of the purposes of the Newsl. is, of 
course, to pass along ideas. But so few of them are picked up that we wonder if 
readers take the attitude that "this is fine for somebody else but not for me"— 
without ever bothering to find out. 

FOR YEARS WE'VE laughed at comic strip characters receiving a load of birdshot in the 
seat of the pants but had to wait for George Denny and Co.'s GREENVILLE ADVOCATE to 
read a straight-faced news report that the sheriff of Montgomery County was looking 
for someone who was eating standing up because an irate farmer had dusted a chicken 
thief's posterior with 7% shot. "The man shrieked, dropped the chickens and ran," 
said the Advocate news story... Bill Crosier, new editor of the ROODHOUSE RECORD, 
undoubtedly confused a couple of candidates when he published choice paragraphs from 
what each had said about the other, in side-by-side columns of his paper. An editors 
note said he had been saving press releases from each candidate for the occasion. 
Among other choice bits, each called attention to the other man's "sorry" record. .. 
Not much newshole in majority of papers coming to the Newslitter desk the week before 
election, as the publishers reaped the harvest of political ads. 

HAROLD T. SCHELLENGER. editor of RANDOLPH REPUBLICAN NEWS, INC., announces that the 
"right to continue to publish the CHESTER NEWS" has been conveyed to Waldo E. and 
Jacqueline Schellenger. Waldo has been serving as editor since last June. Harold 
Schellenger said "that all equipment that has been used to publish the CHESTER NEWS 
would be retained by the RANDOLPH REPUBLICAN NEWS INC., and that the new owners would 
be expected to purchase necessary equipment in order to continue operation." 

AMONG IPA comments were these by Mrs. Roy Rucker, BRIDGEPORT LEADER: "When you attend 
a convention you are supposed to come home loaded— I mean with information, ideas, etc 
—things that you can put to use in your profession or trade to give better 
service. • .People are still funny and one of the best places to find that out is at a 
convent ion.,, No matter how many subscribers you have or how large a paper you get out 
your problems are still about the same," 

KARL MONROE. COLLINSVILLE HERALD , in an editorial titled "DST: Darned Stupid Time" 

says: "In Collinsville, the people once voted in favor of daylight saving time. In 

Illinois, the legislature seemingly expressed the will of the majority in passing 

DST. Thus it must be right even if it leaves us cold. 

, "The Alton Evening Telegraph offers a gently phrased editorial asking for standaro 
daylight saving time. The Telegraph points out that Illinois daylight saving time, 

officially fixed by the state legislature, goes off at 2 a.m. Sunday, October 28, but 
it has already departed in some other states, 

"The trickiest use of this daylight saving confusion occurred on the night of the 
Collinsville High School Homecoming coronation dance. This event, which held the 
crowd of young people better than it usually does, still ended in the annual trek to 
prestigious eating places where the young folks could top the adults with their 
youthful good looks and party clothes. Unfortunately, combining two big events into 
one evening makes a long, long ; night, 

"What excuse did they have for getting home so late? 

"'Well, somebody said daylight saving time went off.' 

"It did. In Minnesota," 

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From Bill Lyons 11-17-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



SIU NEWS SUMMARY 
FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION 

A slightly improved quail population awaits most southern Illinois hunters - 
but pickings may be slim in a narrow "drouth strip" from the Mississippi River to 
the western edges of Williamson and Jackson counties. That's the forecast by S-I-U's 
Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory. Willard Klimstra, director, said quail 
counts are... "the worst in eight years"... on the laboratory's two major research 
areas near Carbondale and Pyatts, Quail season opened Saturday noon (Nov. 17). 

* * * * 

Southern Illinois University has nominated 15 seniors for Woodrow Wilson and 
Danforth Foundation graduate fellowships. The students were nominated for the 
awards by members of the S-I-U faculty on the basis of scholastic achievement. Both 
programs are for students who intend to become college teachers. S-I-U nominees 
include: Gerald Lawless, of Jacksonville; Ronnie Hickey, of Marion; Patricia Hardy, 
of Waterloo; Nancy Kreftmeyer, of Wheaton; Glenn Huisinga, of Calument City; 
Robert L. Miller, of Carterville; Victor R« Cook, of Carbondale; Kenneth Duft, of 
Highland; Dayton Thomas, of Carbondale; John M. Ritenhouse, of Galesburg; 
William A. Ettling, of Carbondale; James G. Wrone, of Clinton; James Adams, of Ava; 
Rosemary McClain, of Rosamond; and Susan Pennington, of Carbondale. 

* * * * 

A Belgian diplomat will explain his country's feeling on the European 
Common Market at Southern Illinois University Tuesday (Nov. 20) at 7:30 p.m. in 
the Morris Library auditorium. Jozef Lodewyck, who is in charge of the Belgian 
consulate at Kansas City, will speak at a meeting of the S-I-U International 
Relations Club. 



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Revolution as Latin Americans think about it will be the subject of a seminar 
at Southern Tuesday (Nov. 20). Albert W. Bork, director of S-I-U's Latin American 
Institute, will speak at the second Latin American Seminar at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday 
in the agriculture building seminar room. Bork plans to discuss the Mexican 
revolution of 1910 and other Latin uprisings, including those in Bolivia and Cuba. 

* * * "k 

An Area Redevelopment Agency project to train 24 nurse's aides in the 
Carbondale area under supervision of Southern Illinois University's Vocational- 
Technical Institute has been approved. Trainees will be referred by the Murphysborc 
office of the Illinois State Employment Service which serves Jackson, Union and 
Perry counties. 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 19 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Archie Scott, Springfield (1515 Homewood), a 
second year commercial art student in Southern Illinois University's Vocational 
Technical Institute, has received a $50 prize from Shawnee Hills Medalists of 
Harrisburg for submitting the winning designs in the firm's 1962 commemorative 
medal design competition. 

Forty-eight VTI commercial art students submitted entries recently. Theme 
for the contest was "The Centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation." The firm 
specializes in souvenir and anniversary medals cast in bronze, silver and platinum 
for national distribution. Beginning last year, the firm has limited its design 
competition to VTI commercial art students. 



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From Bill Lyon3 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 19 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Chancellor Thomas H. Eliot of Washington University, 
St. Louis, will be honored guest here Friday (Nov. 30) at initiation ceremonies 
for Phi Kappa Phi, all-university scholastic honor society at Southern Illinois 
University. He will deliver a public lecture at C p.m. in the University Center 
follotfing the initiation. 

Twenty-five undergraduate and eight graduate students will be admitted to 
membership. Herman M. Haag, professor in the School of Agriculture, is president 
of the SIU chapter. He urges Phi Kappa Phi members from other chapters to report 
their membership to the local chapter. 

Dr. Eliot, installed Oct. 12 as Chancellor of Washington U., is a native of 
Cambridge, Mass. He hac been a reporter for the Boston Globe, a practicing 
attorney, a teacher of law and political science, and has held a variety of 
governmental positions such as counsel for the Social Security Board; regional 
director of the Wage and Hour Division, U.S. Dept. of Labor; head of the British 
Division, London Office of War Information; chief counsel for Division of Power, 
Department of the Interior; and others. He was professor of constitutional law 
and dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Washington U., before elevation to 
the chancellorship. 

Dr. Eliot's talk will be entitled "Progress of Higher Education." 

Reservations from Phi Kappa Phi members for the initiation ceremony at 5:15 p.m. 
and the banquet at 6:30 p.m. should be made prior to Nov. 26 with 
Mrs. Louise Morehouse in the President's Office at the Carbondale SIU campus. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 19 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. « The "Messiah" returns to Southern Illinois University's 
traditional Christmas music program next month after an absence of five years. 
Handel's classic oratorio will be presented with a chorus of 200 voices, under the 
direction of SIU director of choris, Robert Kingsbury. 

To be presented in SIU's Shryock Auditorium Dec. 1 at 7:30 p.m. and the 
following afternoon at 3 p.m., the annual program will feature three professional 
soloists and baritone William Taylor of the SIU music department with the Southern 
Illinois Oratorio Society and University Choir. 

Kingsbury said the "Messiah" will be performed at Christmastime every five 
years from now on. A group of eight other standard oratorios will be rotated among 
intervening Christmas programs and other concerts. "Ue never intended to abandon 
the 'Messiah'," said Kingsbury, "but want to introduce our voice students to as 
much of the classic oratorio literature as possible during their studies." 

Soprano soloist for the two programs will be Teresa Orantes, a native of 
El Salvador who is now staff soloist with the Rockefeller Memorial Chapel Choir at 
the University of Chicago. She has soloed i*ith the Chicago Symphony and was named 
"Singer of the Year" in 1961 by the National Association of Teachers of Singing. 

Chicagoan Lawrence Lane will be tenor soloist. He has performed widely in 
oratorio concerts throughout the midwest and had an Italian concert tour. 

Evelyn Reynolds, contralto from the Chicago Lyric Opera Company, has appeared 
in opera, oratorio and symphony concerts. She is visiting artist for the school year 
at the University of Illinois. 

A program of "Messiah" excerpts will be performed with student soloists for 
the Thursday (Dec. 6) freshman convocation at SIU. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 19 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. -- Two professional free-lance writers will be headliners 
at a writers conference at Southern Illinois University Dec. 8. 

Anne West of Marion and Ethel Reed Strainchamps of St. Louis will tell of 
their experiences in free-lancing. They will join three spare-time free-lancers 
from the SIU faculty for two panel discussions on problems of free-lancing—markets, 
single market or "shotgun approach," research for articles and other angles, 
according to James L.C. Ford, journalism professor and conference director. 

The faculty members are Charles D. Nepl, director of student teaching, who has 
written extensively in the "how to do it" field for both adults and children; 
Howard R. Long, chairman of the journalism department; and Ford. 

Miss West writes both factual articles and fiction, has taught writing courses 
at various colleges and universities, including SIU, and has served as a staff member 
at a number of writers conferences « Her stories and articles have appeared in 
approximately 100 top-ranking magazines of the country as well as in France, 
England, Canada, Denmark and Australia. Several of her short stories have been 
adapted for television. 

Mrs, Strainchamps has been a free-lance writer for a number of years, selling 
to both popular and so-called "quality" periodicals. She is a regular contributor 
to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and regular columnist for two regional papers, and 
is now working on a book. 

The conference is sponsored by the journalism department, the University's 
Extension Division and Theta Sigma Phi, women's journalism fraternity. Inquiries 
should be addressed to Dr. Long, care of the journalism department. Deadline for 
registration is Monday, Dec. 3. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phnne: 453-2276 







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11 - 19 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Southern Illinois University entries teamed for a 
third place sxreepstakes trophy in individual speaking competition at the 16th 
annual Bradley University Speech Tournament, Saturday (Nov. 17) at Peoria. 

Donald Beggs of Harrisburg was ax^arded a superior certificate in discussion, 
ranking fourth highest of 70 competitors. He also won an excellent citation in 
extemporaneous speaking. 

SIU students winning certifactes of excellence were: 

CARBONDALE: Sue Zerban (original oratory) 

CARMI: Jane Statler (original oratory) 

FARINA: Shirley Elkin (oral interpretation) 

GREEN RIVER, WYO. : Calvin Ragsdale (extemporaneous speaking) 

HENDERSON, KY. : Doris Scott (original oratory) 

H0MEW00D: Glenn Koerner, 2546 Clyde (discussion) 

MULKEYTOWN: Bonnie Garner (oral interpretation) 

NORRIS CITY: Carl Hughes (extemporaneous speaking) 

SPRINGFIELD: Gloria Conns, 2129 N. 23rd (oral interpretation) 

WHEATON: Ken Boden, 328 E. Harrison (retention oral report) 



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Archie Scott, center, Southern Illlinois University student from Springfield, 

is happy at winning a $50 commemorative medal design prize sponsored by Shawnee Hills 

Medalists of Harrisburg. With Scott, looking over some of the 48 entries submitted 

by fellow commercial art classmates at SIU's Vocational Technical Institute, are 

earlier winners Daniel Satter field, left, Herrin, 1960 winner, and Miss Nona Fluck, 

Sadorus, one of two winners last year. All three are second year commercial art 

students, 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11 - 19 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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HORRORS!— The season's biggest shock hits Southern Illinois University head 

football coach Carmen Piccone, right, and assistant Bob Franz, as they get the 

word from an electronic computer on the SIU campus. The mechanical brain has just 

predicted a nine point SIU win over North Texas State in Saturday's (Nov. 24) 

windup. Prediction was based on a host of calculations, but pessimistic Piccone 

isn't buying any of it. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11-20-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 






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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 2C - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Team captain Jack Schiltz, NCAA 60-yard record- 
holder Ray Padovan and sophomore standouts Ted Petras and Darrell Green are 
expected to lead Southern Illinois University's swim team Friday (Nov. 23) when 
it challenges Oklahoma in the season's opener at Norman. 

The Salukis, who last year won only two meets while losing to Indiana, 
Cincinnati, Minnesota and Iowa State, appear to be somewhat better balanced 
this season for an equally tough schedule. 

Schiltz, a junior from Harvey, will team up with Petras, North Miami, Fla., 
in the breasts troke events where Coach Ralph Casey figures to be strongest. 
Padovan, also of North Miami, will top Southern's entries in the sprints while 
Green, Hinsdale, has given all indications of becoming the finest backstroker in 
the school's history. 

Other veterans returning from last year include Larry Asmussen, Harvey; 
Gary Lutker, St. Louis; Dale Cunningham, North Miami; Klemens Osika, Harvey; 
John Fischbeck, Miami; John Robbins, Highland Park; Ernie Gonzales, Granite City, 
and A.G. Edwards, McLeansboro. 



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From Fred Huff, Sport Publicist 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-227G 




11 - 20 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. ~ Ten Southern Illinois University seniors, all 
of whom have drawn starting assignments at one time or another this season, 
will wind up their collegiate football careers Saturday afternoon when the Salukis 
host North Texas State. 

Leading the group is Jim Battle, 240-pound end from Chicago, who has started 
every game for SIU since arriving here four years ago following a three-year hitch 
in the Navy. Battle holds two school pass-receiving records and has attracted 
the attention of several pro scouts this season. 

Others who will be appearing for the final time are backs Charles Hamilton, 
Kerr in; Dennis Harmon, Uatseka; Vern Pollock, DeSoto, Mo.; and Charles Lerch, 
Clarksboro, N.J., and linemen Dave Mullane, St. Louis; Charles O'Neill, Chicago; 
Gene Rodriguez, Hammond, Ind,; Sam Silas, Bartow,Fla., and Jim Thompson, Peoria. 

The Salukis will be up against one of the finest running halfbacks in the 
southwest this week when Bobby Smith will attempt to guide his North Texas 
teammates to their sixth win of the season. Smith was a unanimous all-Missouri 
Valley Conference choice last season and the only sophomore to be selected. 



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From Bill Lyons &J t \tf* 11 - 20 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — In the truest tradition of the pessimistic coach, 
Southern Illinois University's Carmine Piccone is crying "foul!" 

After a week of careful cogitation, an electronic brain at SIU has just 
predicted a nine point win for Southern's football team over powerful North Texas 
State here this Saturday. "All season long people have been making us favorites," 
Piccone moaned. "Now a blankety blank machine is doing it." 

The prediction, by a computer at SIU's Data Processing and Computing Center, 
was made on the basis of some 40 "bits" of information on both teams. Players 
were compared, position by position, on everything they've done this season and 
last, from kicking extra points to running back punts. 

"That's the way the diode bounces," said Tom Purcell, computer manager when 
asked if there couldn't possibly be a blown signal somewhere. "The machine doesn't 
know anything about football; it just answers mathematical questions based on 
comparative statistics." 

Purcell and Center Director John Hamblen ran the prediction in their spare 
time. 

Piccone, whose Salukis were trounced by Bowling Green Saturday (Nov. 17), 
21-0, thinks the machine ought to pay some attention to comparative scores. Earlier, 
West Texas whipped Bowling Green, 23-7. North Texas, in turn, beat West Texas, 
20-13. 

"What kind of odds would that thing give on Tom Dewey?" asked the rueful 
coach. 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11 - 20 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Southern Illinois University coaches may be in 
favor of suspending all sports activity during the second full week of November 
next year. Last week just wasn't the week for Saluki athletes. 

The pattern was set when George Woods, third-ranking freshman shot putter 
in the nation last spring, was seriously injured in a hunting accident. 

Chuck Woerz, a double place-winner in last year's NCAA championship 
gymnastics meet, was hurt in a fall while tumbling and is expected to be on 
crutches for a couple of weeks. 

Wrestler Ken Houston, x*ho for the past two years has placed third in the 
NCAA meet, injured his right knee in practice and will undergo surgery this week. 
Two of Houston's teammates were also sidelined indefinitely, Pat Coniglio is 
presently on crutches folloxri.ng an ankle injury and Tony Jackson may be lost for 
the entire season due to a dislocated arm. 

And as a final blow Carl Kimbrel, Southern's second leading ball carrier, 
suffered a broken ankle in his only rushing attempt against Bowling Green last 
Saturday when the Salukis lost their fifth game of the season. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11 - 20 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Richard Franklin, director of Southern Illinois 
University's Community Development Institute, will lecture Peace Corps trainees 
at the University of Oklahoma in Norman Friday and Saturday (Nov. 30-Dec. 1). 

Some 50 volunteers are undergoing a 10-week training session there before 
going to Bolivia. 

Franklin said he will tell the group about "approaches to community change, 
principles involved in the community development process and how to work with 
people effectively in community problem-solving. 11 

Another member of the SIU faculty, Richard W. Poston, research professor 
of community development, is scheduled to instruct the Bolivian Peace Corps group 
later in December. 

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CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — G. Warren Gladders, Ladue, Mo., and president of 
the Martin Oil Co., will be featured as "Alumnus of the Week" on the SIU News 
Review to be seen over WSIU-TV (Channel 8) Wednesday (Nov. 21) at C:30 p.m. 

A Southern Illinois University alumnus is featured weekly on the SIU news 
program, usually seen on Thursday nights. 

Gladders was an Alumni Achievement Award winner in 1961, served as president 
of the Alumni Association in 1953-54, and as president of the SIU Foundation in 
1957-50. 

A native of West Frankfort, Gladders is a member of the class of 1937 at SIU 
and a law graduate of the University of Michigan. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



S" 






11 - 20 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — The first load of primary structural steel for 
Southern Illinois University's $4.2 million Physical Education-Military Training 
Building has arrived and erection of supporting pillars for the building's 
300-foot diameter dome is underway. 

University construction supervisor Willard Hart said the shipments of "red 
iron" v/ill arrive periodically from the fabrication plant in St. Louis, and that 
"no steel will touch the ground" before the dome's 1,100 tons of ribs and 
columns are in place. The big beams are being lifted directly from incoming 
trailers to footings on the outside cement ring of the arena. 

Going up now are 14-foot steel columns that will support a 190-ton tension 
ring at the base of the dome. The 32 ribs of the dome itself will then be placed 
from a boom on a temporary tower at the middle of the arena. A smaller compression 
ring of steel will pull in the ribs at the crown. 

The job is estimated to take six weeks, after having been set back more than 
three months by a combination of weather and materials delays. 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 20 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

SIU NEWS SUMMARY 
FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION 

The first load of primary structural steel for Southern Illinois University's 

4-million 2-hundred- thousand dollar Physical Education-Military Training building 

ha.3 arrived., .and erection of supporting pillars for the building's 3-hundred-ioot 

dianeter dome is under way. Going up now: 14-foot steel columns that will support 

a lSJO^ton tension ring at the base of the dome. The 32-ribs of the dome itself 

will >*lien be placed from a boom on a temporary tower at the middle of the arena. 

A s-aa-ler compression ring of steel will pull in the ribs at the crown. The job 

is estimated to take six weeks — after having been delayed more than three ;aonths 

by weather and materials factors, 

* * * * 

Speaking of sports, S-I-U football coach Carmen Piccone (PIC-CONE 8 ) i& crying 
"fouie" Afrer a week of careful cogitation, an electronic brain at Southern has 
just predici-ed a nine-point win for the Saluki football team over powerful Morth 
Easao State this Saturday (Nov. 24) « All season long people have been making us 
favorites . Piccone moans. Now a blankety-blank machine is doing it. Piccene. 
whose Salukis were trounced by Bowling Green Saturday (Nov. 17) 21- to-no thing, 
thinks the machine should pay some attention to comparative scores. Earlier, 
West Texas whipped Bowling Green 23-to-7. North Texas, in turn, downed Viest 
Texas 20-to-13. 

* * * * 

Two professional free-lance trciters will be headliners at a writers conference 
at S-I-U Saturday (Dec. 0). Anne Nest of Marion and Ethel Reed Strainchamps of 
St. Louis will tell of their experiences in free-lencing, and join three spare- 
time free lancers from the S-I-U faculty for two panel discussions on problems 
of markets, research for articles and other angles. 

* * * * 



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Farmers give Jackson County's economy a sizeable boost with its 13-hundred 
farms having cash sales of 8-million- dollars annually. So Walter J. Wills, 
chairman of Southern Illinois University's agricultural industries department, told 
a Carbondale Kiwanis Club Farm-City Week dinner audience Tuesday night (Nov. 20). 
Wills suggested it's a good idea for persons out of contact with farmers and 
farm-related business to know agriculture's modern productive capacity and its 
share in the local and national economy. Jackson County farmers, he said, sell 
enough livestock annually to fill 16-hundred 55 twenty- two- foot trucks. . .more than 
15-million pounds of milk... and 24- to-30- thousand dozen cases of eggs each year. 

* * * * 

The "Messiah" returns to Southern's traditional Christmas music program next 
month after an absence of five years. Handel's classic oratorio will be presented 
with a chorus of 2-hundred voices. It's to be presented in SIU's Shryock Auditor iurr. 
December First at 7:30 p.m. and the following afternoon at 3 p.m. the program will 
feature three professional Chicago soloists with the SIU Oratorio Society, the 
University Choir, and baritone William Taylor of the SIU mu6ic department. 

* * * * 

Southern Illinois University's community development service has issued 
a new brochure to explain the "community development process." It's available 
by writing the department at Southern. 



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From Bill Lyons jf\\ 11-21-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY J 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

Number 482 in a weekly series — "It Happened in Southern Illinois" — a series 
consisting of regional folklore and historical accounts suitable for feature, 
column, or editorial use. 

THANKSGIVING 

By John W. Allen 

Southern Illinois University 

The prescribed Thursday of November has been observed again, A presidential 
proclamation named it as Thanksgiving Day and asked for its solemn observance. 
Millions, accordingly, paused and reflected upon the bounty of the past year and 
perhaps the blessings of the past century. 

No other special day is so typically American. Excepting Christmas, no other 
one is so widely and thoughtfully observed as this legacy from the Pilgrims. It 
still is dedicated to its first purpose and remains less commercialized than any 
other of our special days. 

That first year at Plymouth had been a diffcult and almost starving one. It 
had been with great diffculty that the colony survived. Their carefully tended crops 
had matured however and it was evident that they had a sufficient food supply for 
the winter. They rejoiced, and declared their thanks to a kind Providence. 

A period of feasting was proclaimed. Men went into the forest and to the 
seashore seeking fowl, animals and fish. Nuts and fruits were gathered. Friendly 
Indians, led by Chief Massasoit, came to join in the feasting and bring added food. 
It was a festive but sober occasion, deeply tinged with Pilgrim piety. This was the 
American beginning of Thanksgiving Day. 

The observance of a special season for giving thanks continued through 
succeeding years. Other communities took up the practice. Though these observances 
came regularly at the end of the growing season, there was no generally agreed upon 
date. Each settlement or colony selected its own day. 

Each year during the Revolution the Continental Congress adopted a resolution 

asking that people observe a season for giving thanks. The first move to make it 

a unified national observance came in 1789 when President Washington designated 

Nov. 26 as a day upon which all were asked to render thanks for established 

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government that gave them liberty, security and happiness. Since most of those 
settling in New England frowned upon any observance of Christmas, even forbidding it, 
Thanksgiving took on added importance, becoming the season's most significant day. 

After the 1709 proclamation by President Washington, 74 years passed before 
another president proclaimed a similar day. In the meantime the custom had been 
continued on a local level \jith different days proclaimed. All the while, various 
persons had kept urging establishment of a single day for a national observance. 
Among them was Sarah Josepha Hale, the crusading editor of Gody's Lady's Book and 
author of the poem, "Mary Had a Little Lamb" which was immortalized by McGuffey. 
Mrs. Hale continued her urging through 40 years. In 1063 her letter to President 
Lincoln aroused a response. 

On Oct. 3 President Lincoln issued his proclamation naming the fourth Thursday 
of November as Thanksgiving Day. The observance this year thus was the one hundredth 
since a uniform day was established. Some of the presidential proclamations have 
been materpieces. At least three are outstanding. The one issued by Washington 
in 1739 remains one of impressive dignity. Lincoln's in 1363 is such as only a 
Lincoln could produce. One by Woodrow Wilson during World War I is among the great 
ones. 

Thanksgiving Day has remained very much an American institution. There is no 
day that paralels ours in Europe although during World War II British churches had 
special services for American soldiers stationed there and servicemen were invited 
to British homes for a Thanksgiving Day meal. 

One can easily believe that Thanksgiving Day will remain a national institution 
so long as our nation endures and it will always be a season of memories--family 
reunions, pumpkin and mince pies, turkey and cranberry sauce and schoolrooms with 
decorations of Pilgrim design. We should be grateful to the Pilgrims for their 
gift of the custom. 



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From Bill Lyons -f I 11-21-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



ATTENTION: Farm Editors 



SIU COUNTRY COLUMN 



By Albert Meyer 

Agriculture is not a declining industry unimportant to the nation's economic 
picture, as might be thought by a large segment of the United States population that 
has no direct contact with farmers in day to day activities, says Dr. Walter J. Wills, 
Southern Illinois University agricultural economist. 

To emphasize the point, he cites data on Jackson County (111.) used in a recent 
Farm-City Week meeting in Carbondale. Similar reports could be found on other 
counties of similar size. Here is the information in a nutshell. 

The county has about 1,300 farms whose annual cash sales total $8 million. 
Field crops and livestock account for more than three-fourths of the sales; fruits 
and vegetables contribute 10 per cent; dairying, 8 per cent, and poultry 3 per cent. 

The average farm in the county has 185 acres of land. Nearly half of the 
full-time commercial farms have gross annual sales of more than $5,000. However, 
38 per cent of the farms are classified as part-time or residential. 

In a normal production year the county's farmers have expenditures of a half 

million dollars for labor, a half million dollars each for fertilizers and petroleum 

products, and three-fourths million dollars each for feed and livestock. They use 

more than 5,000 tons of dry fertilizer and nearly 1,000 tons of liquid fertilizer 

each year to improve crop production. 

The farmers own much expensive farming equipment, such as nearly 600 grain 

combines, more than 600 corn pickers, nearly 300 pickup hay balers, more than 800 

trucks and 1,300 automobiles, and nearly 2,200 tractors. 

They sell enough livestock, mostly cattle and hogs, each year to fill 1,655 

twenty- foot trucks. In addition they ship out 1,700 carloads of grain each harvest 

season, sell nearly a half million bushels of peaches and apples, more than 15 

million pounds of milk and 24,000 to 30,000 dozen cases of eggs. 

This emphasizes that agriculture is a highly dynamic industry requiring much 
management skill and know-how, a fact that both farmers and non-agricultural business 
leaders need to recognize, Willis says. 






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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11 - 21 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Nearly 400 high school students from 39 schools 
of southern Illinois are preregistered to participate in a one-day Folk Dance Clinic 
at Southern Illinois University Saturday, Dec. 1. 

The students will be divided into snail classes in vrtiich SIU students from 
the women's physical education department will teach them new American folk dances, 
including "Busybody," "Shortcake" and "Salty Dog Rag," while department faculty 
members will instruct the teachers who accompany the high school students. 

Special features of the clinic will include exhibition performances by the 
Aquaettes, girl swimmers, and the Dance Club. 

The clinic is being arranged under the general chairmanship of Jo Anne Thorpe, 
instructor of physical education for women, with Judy IJhitney of St. Louis 
(4713 Irving) as student chairman. 

High schools signed up for the clinic, together with the number of students 
expected to attend and the supervising teacher, follow: 

ANNA-J0NESB0R0, 10, Shari Marvin 

BELLEVILLE, 10, Roberta Hamilton 

BENTON, 3, Patricia Hollada 

CAIRO HIGH SCHOOL, 10, Martha Crawford 

CAIRO, SUMNER HIGH SCHOOL, 7, P.M. Little 

CAMPBELL HILL, TRICO HIGH SCHOOL, 10, Mrs. Celeste Nowers 

CARBONDALE COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL, 10, Phoebe Cox 

CARBONDALE, UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL, 10, Sandy Goller 

CARRIER MILLS, 10, Mrs. Helen Murphy 

CARTERVILLE, 6, Sharon Russell 

CENTRALIA, 10, Linda Brady 

CHESTER, 4 to 6, Mrs. Marie Juergens 

COfiDEN, 10, Mrs. John Reeves 

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DAHLGREN, 10, Marilyn Sampson 

DUQUOIN, 8, Mrs. Rosemary Pull is 

EQUALITY, 6, Mary Ann Conaway 

FLORA, 10, Patricia Day 

FREEBURG, 10, Mrs. Violet Fritz 

GALATIA, G, Mrs. Jane Wickham 

GOLCONDA, 10, Mrs. Jan Trovillion 

HARRICBURG, 5, Mrs. Peggy Ripperdan 

HERRIN, 10, Mrs. Gerry Zerse 

JOHNSTON CITY, 12 (don't have teacher* s name) 

MADISON, 10, Mrs. Frances Merkelback 

MARION, 5, Mrs. Doris Baker 

MOUNDS, 10, Mrs. Inez Donnigan 

MT. VERNON, 10, Rebecca Petitt 

MURPHYSBORO, 10, Mrs. Clara B. Diers 

NASHVILLE, 4, Sue Early 

NOT ATHENS, 10, Judy Hall 

ST. ELMO, no students, Mrs. Beth Loving 

SPARTA, 10, Mrs, Betty Crouch 

STEELEVILLE, 10, Sandra Swafford 

TAMMS, 8, Mrs. Howard Phillips 

TRENTON, WESCLIN COMMUNITY UNIT, 10, Mrs. Joyce Wilson 

VANDALIA, 8, Brenda Zeh 

VIENNA, 8, Judi Knight 

WEST FRANKFORT, 10, Mrs. Maryann Riva 

WOOD RIVER-EAST ALTON, 10, Mrs. Shirley McCune. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



6^ 



11 - 21 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — David P. Lauerman, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Louis F. Lauerman of (415 South Railway) Mascoutah, a graduate student in 
government at Southern Illinois University, will leave March 1, 1963 for 
Wellington, New Zealand and a year of study as the District 651 Rotary 
International fellowship winner. 

He will study political science at Victoria University of Wellington. 
Lauerman 1 s fellowship is one of 137 granted this year by the Rotary Foundation 
for study in 41 countries. 

He was nominated for the fellowship by the Mascoutah Rotary Club and 
selected by the District 651 (Southern Illinois) and International scholarship 
boards . 

Lauerman, 23, is a graduate of Millikin University at Decatur with a degree 
in speech (radio-TV). He has been a graduate student at SIU since January of 
1962. 

At Millikin he was president of Delta Sigma Phi social fraternity, Alpha 
Epsilon Rho, radio-television honorary, Pi Kappa Delta, forensics group and a 
member of Phi Chi Alpha, senior men's honorary. 

He is a member of the Southern International Relations Club and will serve 
as secretary general of the Fifth Model United Nations on campus, Feb. G-9. 
Lauerman was an announcer and sports director for WTVP-TV in Decatur. 

The Rotary grants were established in 1947. The average award is $2,700 
and includes travel, board and tuition costs. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 21 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — The deadline for National Science Foundation 
summer fellowships applications is Friday (Dec. 7) the Southern Illinois University 
Graduate School reminded graduate teaching assistants today. 

Dr. David Kenney, assistant dean of the Graduate School, said graduate 
teaching assistants in the sciences, economics, geography, psychology and sociology 
may obtain full details on the program from his office. 

In 1962 3IU had five NSF summer fellowship winners. The grants are for 8 
to 12 week summer sessions and pay stipends from $50 to $05 a week. 

Approjcimately 1,000 such fellowships are awarded at participating schools 
each summer. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



^ 



11 - 23 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Three visiting specialists will speak in public 
meetings at Southern Illinois University Wednesday (Nov. 23), Thursday (Nov. 29) 
and Monday (Dec. 3) as part of the SIU geography department's current lecture 
series. 

Richard Edes Harrison, New York, one of the country's few successful free 
lance cartographers (map artists), will address two meetings Wednesday. He will 
talk about "Maps and Mountains" at an informal 4 p.m. meeting in the Agriculture 
Buildix-.g Seminar Room for geography students, faculty and other interested persons. 
He will speak on "The Role of Art in Cartography" at G p.m. in the Morris Library 
auditorium. Although without formal geography training in a university, Harrison 
has taught at Syracuse University and his work has appeared in Time, Life, and 
other magazines and books. 

A University of Rhode Island geographer, Edward Higbee, will speak Thursday 
at 7:30 p.m. in Agriculture Building Room 214 on the topic: "American Agriculture 
Today." In addition to his work as a university geography teacher, Higbee is 
research director for a Twentieth Century Fund (a privately-endowed foundation) 
study of American agriculture in transition. 

A British geographer, Malcolm Lewis, who at present is visiting lecturer at 
the University of Nebraska, will speak at the Monday afternoon meeting. The session, 
open to ail interested persons, will be at 4 p.m. in the Agriculture Building 
Seminar Room. His topic will be "The Great Plains." 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 23 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — William J, McKeefery, dean of academic affairs 
at Southern Illinois University, has been named member of a three-man board of 
e::aminers representing the North Central Association of Colleges and Universities, 
With team mates from the University of Minnesota and Wayne State University, 
Detroit, he will vist Butler University, Indianapolis, Ind., Dec. 10 to review 
its academic program. 

Butler seeks accreditation for its program leading to the award of specialist 
degrees, McICeefery said. 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 23 - 62 

S0UTHER1I ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

Editors: Note Local Names 



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CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — Three animal industries judging teams from Southern 
Illinois University are competing in national intercollegiate livestock judging 
contests in Chicago during the next few days. 

The contests are being held in connection with the International Livestock 
and Dairy Exposition Nov, 23-Dec. 1. The SIU livestock judging team, coached by 
H.W. Miller, participated in judging Saturday (Nov. 24). Coach Bill Goodman* s 
poultry judging team will compete Tuesday (Nov. 27) and the dairy judging team, 
under Coach David Wieckert, will participate Wednesday (Nov. 20). 

Livestock judging team members are, by towns: 

ALBION: Philip Utley, RR4. 

FAIRFIELD: Allen Wilson, RR3. 

GREENVIEW: James Miller, RR2. 

JACOB: Herbert Oetjen. 

MARTINSVILLE: Scott Chapman, RR1. 

TUSCOLA: Edward Bass, RR1. 

WYOMIEG: James Down, RR1. 

Poultry judging team members are, by towns: 

EDWARDSVILLE: Marshall Bardelraeier , RR3. 

MULK2YT0WN: Bob Rowland, RR2. 

SHELBYVILLE: Paul Page, RR2. 

Dairy judging team members are, by towns: 

GREENVIEW: Thomas Walquist. 

MCLEANSBORO: H. Dean Cullins, RR3. 

OBLONG: Steve Cortelyou, 606 E. Ohio. 

PERCY: Ronald Kiehna. 

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Southern Illinois Inc. ^/^^ 11-23-62 

Goffrey Hughes, Ex. Director 
Carterville, 111, 

Four Southern Illinois residents, who have been instrumental in making 
Southern Illinois Day in Chicago a headline event, attended a press conference in 
Chicago Monday (Nov. 26). 

The press conference was called by William Krick, chairman of the Illinois 
Committee of the Chicago Association of Commerce and Industry, to publicize the 
event to be held in the Prudential Building Friday, Nov. 30. 

Miss Pamela Gilbert, Carbondale, "Miss Illinois of 1962," was greeted by 
Donnalya Froend, "Miss Chicago of 1962." 

Accompanying Miss Gilbert were R.L, Hendrickson, Mt. Vernon, chairman of the 
1962 Southern Illinois Day, R.A. Reel, Marion, co-chairman, and Goffrey Hughes, 
executive director of Southern Illinois Incorporated. 

Several Chicago firms that have substantial investments in Southern Illinois 
also attended the press conference. Gene Utterback, tresurer of the United Electric 
Coal Company; Emmet Holmes, general Passenger agent for the Illinois Central 
Railroad; and John H. Maxheim, assistant to the president of United Cities Gas 
Company, were present to answer questions concerning activities of their firms in 
Southern Illinois. 

United Cities Gas Company will be host to Pam Gilbert for Southern Illinois Day 
and will fly Pam to Metropolis early Saturday morning, Dec. 1, to participate in 
the annual Christmas Day parade. 

Savar&l exhibitors are planning to conduct drawings with prizes consisting of 
free weekend trips to Southern Illinois. One exhibitor will offer a weekend at the 
Holiday Inn in Carbondale with meals at Engel's Restaurant. Another will offer a 
weekend at Joe Cruse* s Crab Orchard Motel. Another will offer a weekend at Giant 
City Lodge. 

A total of fifty-one exhibits will be featured at the Nov. 30 Southern Illinois 
day which will be held from 12 noon to 9:30 p.m. in the Prudential Building in 
Chicago. _ 3Q _ 






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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



-f // 



11 - 23 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov, — Registration times were announced today for a 
secretarial review course being offered soon in Benton and a secretary's seminar 
in Mt. Vernon under the joint sponsorship of the Southern Illinois University 
Division of Technical and Adult Education and the area chapter of the National 
Secretaries Association, 

The seminar for secretaries, office managers and other office workers will be 
held in the Mt. Vernon Township High School from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, (Dec. 1). 
M.J. Gundlach, senior systems analyst for Wagner Electric Corp., St. Louis, will 
lead the discussion on "The Secretary's Function in Records Handling, Inventory 
and Material Controls." Participants may register and see modern office equipment 
displays from 1 to 2 p.m. preceding Gundlach 1 s address. 

The Benton class, beginning with registration at 7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 3, will 
have eight weekly meetings dealing with Secretarial Bookkeeping Review. 
Mrs. Barbara Benard, Benton high school bookkeeping teacher, will be in charge of 
the class. It will meet from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Mondays in the Benton high school. 
It will have special interest for secretaries preparing to take examinations to 
qualify as Certified Professional Secretaries. Tuition will be $4.80 except for 
veterans qualifying under the Illinois Military Scholarship program and for SIU 
employees. 

Additional information about either course may be obtained from Pearl Roberts, 
certified public secretary, Box 66, Johnston City, or the SIU Division of Technical 
and Adult Education, Carbondale. 



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From Bill Lyons -r~-\J 11-24-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY /P- ( 

Carbondale, Illinois / 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

SIU NEWS SUMMARY 
FOR aADIO AND TELEVISION 

Chancellor Thomas H. Eliot of Washington University in St. Louis will be an 

honored guest Friday (Nov, 30) at Southern Illinois University at initiation 

ceremonies for Phi Kappa Phi — an all-university scholastic honor society at 

Southern. Chancellor Eliot will deliver a public lecture at C p.m. in the University 

Center following the initiation. Twenty- five undergraduates and eight graduate 

students will be admitted to membership. 

* * * * 

Agriculture is not a declining industry as might be thought by a large segment 
of the United States population having no direct contact with farmers. Dr. 
Walter J. Wills, Southern Illinois University agricultural economist, says 
agriculture is a "highly dynamic industry requiring much management skill and 
know-how" ... a fact that both farmers and non-agricultural business leaders need 
to recognize. 

Nearly 4-hundred high school students from 39 schools in southern Illinois are 
pre-registered to participate in a one-day Folk Dance Clinic at S-I-U Saturday 
(Dec. 1). Special features of the clinic will include exhibition performances by 
the SIU Aquaettes, girl swimmers, and the Dance Club. 

* * * * 

Three specialists will speak in public meetings at Southern Wednesday 

(Nov. 2C), Thursday (Nov. 29) and Monday (Dec. 3) as part of the S-I-U geography 

department's current lecture series. ..Richard Edes Harrison of New York, one of 

the nation's few successful free lance cartographers, will address two meetings 

Wednesday. . .his subjects: "Maps and Mountains," and "The Role of Art in Cartography. 

A University of Rhode Island geographer — Edward Higbee — will speak Thursday 

night on "American Agriculture Today" ... and a British geographer, Malcolm Lewis, 

currently iisiting lecturer at the University of Nebraska, will speak in a Monday 
afternoon meeting on "The Great Plains, V -more- 



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A Springfield second-year commercial art student in Southern Illinois 
University's Vocational -Technical Institute. ..Archie Scott... has won a fifty 
dollar prize from the Shawnee Hills Medalists of Harrisburg. Scott got the award 
for submitting the winning designs in the firms 1962 commemorative medal design 
competition. 

ft ft ft * 

Idle farm machines should be put into storage now, says J.J. Paters on, 
S-I-U agricultural engineer. Paterson says the average farmer today has an 
investment in modern farm machinery that easily may run to 15-to-20-thousand 
dollars. There is always depreciation on the machinery, he says, but how fast 
it takes place depends much on the farmer's good operation and management practices, 

ft ft * ft 

A one-day writers conference will be held at S-I-U Saturday (Dec. C), 
with Anne West and Ethel Strainchamps heading the staff. Miss Uest, of 
Carterville and Marion, has had short stories and fiction published in scores 
of top-ranking magazines, and Miss Strainchamps of Springfield, Missouri, is a 
regular St, Louis Post-Dispatch contributor. 



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No. 453 November 24, 1962 

S. I. E. A. NEW SLITTER 

BEULAH WAS PLEASED TO KNOW YOU REMEMBERED. . .E. J. MAHLANDT DID NOT GO TO GERMANY,.. 
KRAMERS FIND ST. LOUIS... SAM SMITH TAKES WOMAN TO ANOTHER MEETING. ..ED.'S HEAD FOUND 
EMPTY. 



FOLLOWING the annual check-up I was sent over the river last week to have my head 
examined by a specialist, two nurses and what is known in the trade as a technician. .. 
"Don't be frightened," they said as they turned on some frightening gadgets— one of 
which had all the earmarks of a Geiger counter, but no trace of uranium was traced. 
Then I was shunted into a soundproof booth, ideal for reading, from which communication 
was by various means, including semaphore. • .Anyway, in my head they found nothing, 
which will come as no surprise to some of the brethren • 

AT WASHINGTON U . we were highly pleased to discover that almost no one knew for sure 
where the publicity office was located. We were pleased, never quite being able to 
forget the time an editor visited the SIU campus, asked for Info. Service and drew a 
blank., .When you visit another newspaper, you may find some things being done 
differently, but usually don't find much that you can use, because each situation is 
different •• .So it is with handout operations. You can always learn some thing- -but not 
a great deal that you can use at home. 

SO HOWARD LONG and I ate at the Press Club— and found Beulah Schaacht munching. Told 
her some SIEA-ers still remark now and then about her laugh- a- minute talk at the April 
meeting in I960.. .Went to see "The Longest Day," which was superb, and next morning 
visited many notables while waiting for the NEA to get underway.. .At the P-D, Bill 
Plunkett reported Jim Woods, state ed., out with a broken ankle— thanks to playing 
football with his own youngsters*. .Dale Etter, a product of Maud Hoff's Palmyra, 
reported his son Henry still holding his own at the BLOOMINGTON PANTAGRAPH,..It was 
refreshing to find these elders in the company of such youthful talent as represented 
by Ray Deffry and Joe DeBlaze... Slaving on the copy desk was Elbert Talley, who gave 
a series of journ. lectures last month at SIU. He was still fretting at some of the 
carelessly written copy coming over the wire.. .He wouldn't have cared for the 
department store sign describing a new book as a "long-awaited classic. ''...Dale 
reported that Paul Greer, long retired as state ed.,is writing "another book". ..Julius 
Klymer and Art Witman, master photogs, said "No" so nicely to a pix idea that we were 
scarcely disappointed. . .Southern Illinois hill country is one of Art's favorite areas • 
Hadn't seen Julius since Bill Horrell staged a photo workshop at Harrisburg. 

AT THE GLOBE . H.R., George Killenberg and Ray Noonan were full of ideas for 
improving the profession, and George Carson was ready to start working on it as soon 
as the "Old Newsboys" promotion was over. He reported THIRTY-ONE THOUSAND volunteers 
for this charitable project— including an airline promise to buy copies for all of 
their St. Louis passengers Wednesday. He predicted the special edition would sell 
more than 165,000 copies beyond normal sales for the day.. • .George's job is promotion, 
but he takes on so many extras --including an outdoor column and goose hunting with 
"clients"— we don't see how he manages without flying apart*. .Affable George Dent 
still runs on cigars*. ."Boesch" Boeschens tein was on the verge of crusading by 
needling, and Sue Ann Wood was leaving to cover the opening session of the NEA. 

OPENING SPEAKER . Lewis Galantiene, counsellor to the Free Europe Committee, Inc., — 
which operates Radio Free Europe— and a man who has spent "almost a lifetime avoiding 
a career," quoted this quote, "There are few ways in which a man can be more innocently 
employed than in making money". 

*********** 

Compiled by Information Service, Southern Illinois University, for the Southern 
Illinois Editorial Association, the News litter is made possible because of the extent 
to which area editors include Information Service on their mailing lists. (more) 



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Page 2 

SAID Russia fears the European Common Market more than it fears the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization, that Russians "are learning to respect the strength inherent in 
a free economy." 

WITH MRS. VERLE handling the maps, the Gibson City Kramers reached St. Louis without 
anymore than the usual difficulties. Last we saw of Brother Kramer, he was studying 
a Just-o-writer intently... Ken Mollman arrived early for the "Canadian reunion 
breakfast"... Karl Monroe rushed over as soon as the Thursday edition seemed to be on 
its way. • .Said Kathy O'Dell and friend have promoted a women's page- -which Karl is 
now trying to crash with ads. Reported the high school news page idea has spilled 
over to two Junior high schools. One, completed only recently, already is enrolled 
to capacity, 1100. 

SAD SAM SMITH of Metropolis fame was all smiles again because he had fetched the 
same attractive woman who accompanied him to Spgf. (Jane Mollman, please note new 
attempt at abbreviation)— his wife, and she had agreed not to go shopping, much... One 
editor wasn't interested in the Freedom of Information part of the program. He 
wanted freedom FROM information (Ouch I)... Another who was introduced claimed to be a 
rare individual "devoted to amiable laziness "...Don't know if other SIEA-ers came 
later because we bad to hurry home to get ready to leave again. 

IRWIN YARE .O'Fallon and East St. Louis, was on hand with some wit and a hang-down 
pipe... Art Jenkins was so quiet we never did see him...E. J. Mahlandt, Breeze, did 
not go to Europe despite the fact the Newsl. said he did... He went to the hospital 
for two weeks instead, will try again in the spring to reach relatives in Germany— 
on a more leisurely schedule than the original... What does a female shopper do with 
time saved by walking down a moving escalator?... Harry Hellman was on hand for Ludlow 
...Charlie Miller was zipping around for Photo-Lathe, and Charlie Morris and Wayne 
DeNeal were peddling paper— with Charlie doing a bit of glancing toward the day of 
retirement. 

CHARLIE Better-Buy-From-Butler (or Go-Get- It- From-Graham) had taken meeting time to 
write us a note— before we happened to meet. It read: "I was amazed to read in this 
week's issue of the Newslitter that you plead ignorance of what a 'shooting stick' 
is— but on second thought I realize that you would hardly be old enough to have seen 
one in action. No charge for the compliment! (It's worth a cigar, Charlie.) 

"Simply expressed, a shooting stick is (or was) a notched metal rod about 6" , 
long used to hammer wood or metal wedges, forerunners of quoins, into position in 
order to tighten the form. (Excellent sketch here looked like— a shooting stick.) 

"The old-time printer just put his shooting stick up against the wedge and 'had 
at it' with his mallet until his form was tightened to his satisfaction and would 
'lift' with no type fallout. Catch on? This particular piece of equipment would 
indeed be a 'museum piece' nowadays, and Kenny Mollman is fortunate in having one in 
his possession— nickel-plated, tool...". . .The John Sheleys' son John, 6, decided to 
walk home from school alone, was struck by a car ...Condition serious .. .More details late 
DON KRAMER . FAIRBURY BLADE, arrived home from the NEA at 5 a.m. Saturday, coming back 
early so he could take his two boys pheasant hunting. We saw him briefly Saturday 
before going out to battle in that ringneck infested territory.. .In a Carbondale store 
today the clerk reported that a boy fired at a rabbit and inadvertently hit Don in one 
foot, that Don was in the hospital briefly but that the wound was not serious.. .It 
might have been worse. One man had a heart attack. ., So there you have it. • .Saw Irving 
Dilliard back-slapping in the distance at the NEA but never did "meet up" with him. 

ERNIE HBLTSLEY . 28, West Frankfort, will be available for a reporting job after 
completing requirements for graduation, Dec. 14. Prefers weekly or small to medium 
daily. Some experience. • .Write or call the journ. dept. or Info. Service. 

LATE. LATE BULLETIN : The SIEA Winter Meeting will be held at Belleville, Augustine's 

Restaurant, on Jan. 19, according to word just flashed by Pres. Russ Hoffman— who 

already has this week's paper out (2 p.m. Tuesday). The food at Augustine's is 
excellent, and the luncheon price will be $2 or LESS. (more) 






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Page 3 

EVERETT SMITH . ST. ELMO BANNER., writes: "Who are you trying to kid, pretending you 
are too young to know what a 'shooting stick' is? (I'm just a boy, Everett.) 

"If your memory really does n?.ed refreshing, it is a gadget a foot or so long, 
sort of like a punch, with a claw hang?*.ug down near the ond. It was used to drive 
wooden or metal wedges (old time quoins) into place. (Live and learn - that's life... 
Wonder if Bob S. knows what a shooting stick is?) 

"Make-up stones on the paper I own--d up in Iowa before coming to St. Elmo in 
1945 were deeply grooved under the quoins, where years of driving them into place 
with said shooting stick had cut deeply into the marble. 

"Had an inspiration one time to turn the stones over and use the other and 
presumably unscarred side, but turned them back in a hurry when I found the reverse 
sides deeply engraved, 'Sacred to the Memory of...* 

"ST ILL GETTING out the Banner every week, but miss Bob like the dickens. I 
didn't realize until after he left for SIU how much of the load he had been taking 
off my shoulders the last few months he was working for us. Talked to hif. on -he 
phone this afternoon and he said he was getting his studying organized to Lhe point 
where he was finding himself with time on his hands once in awhile. He'll probably 
be over bittr.ng Brown for a job on Egyptian production presently, just to keep busy 
if nothing else. He is anxious to learn that offset stuff. 

"Personally, I still think a lot of fellows are going overboard prematurely on 
offset, but that just marks me as an old fogey. I have seen few letterpress shops 
where a small sum spent updating present equipment wouldn't make for as efficient 
production as many thousand spent on a conversion to offset. Of course, Bob will 
probably convince me eventually that I am wrong. Offset presswork I might buy, but 
'cold type* still leaves me cold. 

"Just located the enclosed picture of a shooting stick in a 1923 AIF catalog. 
Nickle pitted then, too! (The 7-inch nickeled sticks were priced at 75c, the hickory 
ones a: 20c.) 

JANE M OLLMAN severe critic and Oak St. stringer, Millstadt, takes us to task for 
using SPFG. as an abbreviation, although she knew perfectly good and well what we 
meant. She writes in her sharpest style: "Bill--What I want to know is: just 
WHERE were you while the rest of the troops were in Springfield. Spoofing, Illinois? 
Swgmpfog, Illinois? (I was in the presidential suite, of course.) 

"Pete and I were sorry to miss the meeting, but you know how it is. Somebody 
just had to stay home to tote all those sacks of money to the bank. (Tough, but it's 
a living.) 

"Which reminds me that a few nights ago, Pete told Eric, our two-year-old, that 
it was 'time to hit the sack.' The young man obediently fetched a paper bag from the 
back hall, brought it to Pete, and gave it a tremendous whack. 'There, Daddy, I hit 
the sack.' Oh, he's a real wit, that one. A million laughs. Want to sign him up?" 
•••(Jane, no, because— well, wait until I tell you about my grandson,,.) 

ALLEN YOUNT and Harry Hillis, OLNEY DAILY MAIL, rated a paragraph in Editor ana 
Publisher's review of home town girl Elaine Shepard's new book, Forgive Us Our Press 
.^sses, to wit; "Incidentally, her old home town newspaper, the Olney Daily Mail, 
Inad lined the trip (^irst by a woman on an aircraft carrier) 'Ike and Elaine Off On 
Cordial Tour '."... Also from E & P the word that Louis J. Kramp, correspondent in 
charge of the Springfield bureau, Associated Press, from 1943 to 1945, has received 
another promotion in AP ranks and now is assistant general manager in charge of 
radio and tv activities.., (Larry Kramp, A.P, Springfield, is a brother of Louis.) 

JIMMY W T SST.NGER . CAIRO EVENING CITIZEN, bandied the ads and layout for the new 
'Sportsmen's Guide of Horseshoe Lake," and he and Guyla Moreland (or maybe it was 
ber husband) and Gene Aydt of the CITIZEN took the pix for the Guide.., Jimmy worked 
just as hard but had nothing to show for it later when he ran for county commissioner* 
. .Art Schulz, PALESTINE REGISTER, reports that a C, of C, committee is asking for 
•550' in donations to replace the community's Christmas decorations. . .While Madeline 
?rouct of the Register says, "One of these days someone is going to trcite a book on 
'How To Get Out Of Doing It Yourself. 1 He will make a fortune." (more) 



Page 4 

HERMAN DALKERT . WATERLOO TIMES, gave UPI, Marion, one of the "most exact and careful 
election reports" received from any of the counties, according to Rae Holraan, one of 
the Info. Servicers who worked election night... The Dalkerts have been cashing in so 
heavily on legals lately that we expect them to take off soon for Florida... Heard 
Ed Akers, CHESTER HERALD- TRIBUNE, closed up home and shop election night in order to 
operate out of the Randolph clerk's office. 

DICK FINFGELD . HENRY NEWS REPUBLICAN, relates: "Among others we met at the IPA 
meeting was Royce Bridges of the VIENNA TIMES in Johnson county, who stands out in 
my memory because of the unusual Christmas present he received a few years ago. 

"The undertaker in Vienna promised to give Royce an 80-acre piece of land in 
Johnson county as a gift, and some time after the holidays Bridges discovered that 
his friend had made good on his promise, with some to spare. He not only gave him 
80 acres, but slipped over an extra 30 on him besides. 

"This is related here not for the purpose of proving the generosity of under- 
takers in southern Illinois, but as a way of reflecting the value of some of the land 
in that section." 

AL SEILE R. PIKE COUNTY REPUBLICAN, says: "We agree with our fellow newspaperman 
that what this country needs is more 9-year-old students who write like adults. And 
maybe fewer adults who write like 9- year-olds? "...He also reaped a neat harvest from 
a nearly full page signature ad warning farmers to be careful at harvest time. 

THE LAWRENCEVILLE DAILY RECORD reports that soft drinks and cookies were served at 
the Open House held Sunday at the city's new sanitary disposal plant.. .Just before 
selling the FLORA DAILY NEWS RECORD, Earl Wood reported that Flora had landed a new 
industry, the Imperial Products Company, makers of fiberglass boats and related 
products... During homecoming days the Auburn merchants gave away a silver dollar with 
each $10 purchase, according to Joe Michelich...Joe also helped Charlie Jones with 
his printing the week that the press motor burned out at the VIRDEN RECORDER shop. 
Others, mentioned previously, were Brothers Reiher and Phelps at the CARLINVILLE 
DEMOCRAT and Bill Schmitt at the ENQUIRER. 

NORRIS JONES , one of the Jones boys, writes a sports column for the RECORDER... 
CHARLIE reports that the Board of Directors of the Virden Unit School District has 
established a special class for children who are mentally handicapped.. .In his columr 
Charlie tells about "a farmer in western Kansas who put a tin roof on his barn. Then 
a tornado blew the roof off, and when the farmer found it in the next county, it was 
twisted and mangled beyond repair. 

"A friend of his advised him that a large automobile company would pay him a 
price for the scrap tin, and the farmer decided he would ship the roof to the company 
to see how much he could get for it. He crated it up in a big wooden box and sent it 
cff to Michigan, marking it plainly with his return address so the company would know 
where to send the check. 

"Weeks passed. Finally the farmer was just on the verge of writing when he 
received a letter. It said, 'We don't know what hit your car, mister, but we'll have 
it fixed for you by the fifteenth of next month.'" 

IN HIS GIBSON CITY COURIER column, Dave Kramer refers to high school coach Bill Mitze, 
We never did know Bill Mitze although we lived about a half a block from him about 
TOO years ago. Bill came along several years after his two older brothers and 
probably was starting to go to school about the time we left Marissa. It is worthy 
of note that his brother Henry, teacher in Sparta High School, is a quail hunter, 
and Bill's dad, somewhere in bis 70' s, hunts quail in the daytime and goes coon 
hunting at night— setting a pace that none of the boys can match. 

JESS STONECIPHER said the ARCOLA RECORD-HERALD Open House was we 11- at tended, with 
readers turning out in force to view the new engraving machine and teletypesetter 
equipment... Lewida Reppert, ANNA GAZETTE DEMOCRAT, is continuing an excellent series, 
"Meet And Know Your Union County School Teachers." (more) 



Page 5 

A.M. WALTON , the Bard of Dean Bunting's ALBION JOURNAL-REGISTER says: "Really, I do 
not have many collections. A small collection of Indian artifacts, a couple hundred 
species of sea shells, a similar number of polished stones and minerals and a small 
collection of pre-Pennsylvanian marine fossils. Any of these I am ready to discuss 
learnedly and at length with any visitor who happens to so much as glance in their 
direction ." 

KEN IRISH . FARINA NEWS: "Sometimes we are criticized when a typographical error 
occurs in THE NEWS, We may make errors in fact now and then because we don't pretend 
to know everything about the printing industry but we have managed to keep our paper 
relatively free (well, 99 44/ 100% free anyhow) of simple errors. "♦..Rodney Brenner, 
Pope County HERALD-ENTERPRISE, is mad as hops because some character has been turning 
in false fire alarms. ..Joe Aaron in the EVANSVILLE COURIER: "We want to go somewhere 
—anywhere at all— we want to see strange new places... As for me, I have come to 
realize that I will dream my dreams of Ireland and of Spain and that I will not get 
much closer to either of them than Boonville.". . .Len Johnson in the AVA CITIZEN: 
"Now that the picnics and homecoming are over we can save enough money to buy coal 
for winter." 

SID LANDFILED . Ml. STERLING DEMOCRAT: "Well, the D-M had its face lifted and we are 
mighty proud of our new appearance. From the old front with its large glass windows 
we have been transformed into a front with small high windows, on either side of the 
new doorway and only one small window on street level. Our front is now of enameled 
aluminum, four strips of grey to one of turquoise, on the first floor, while the 
lower half of the second story is solid gray. Our doorway is turquoise framed, and 
with the new door of aluminum really stands out." 

IN his remorseful rendition of reminiscences No. 1391, Howe Morgan, SPARTA NEWS- 
PLAINDEALER, recalls: "On that Dudleyville farm, we had an orchard out back of the 
house. In the fall, we'd pick up the downfalls, load 'em in a wagon bed and take 
'em to the cider mill in town. We'd watch that mill grind the apples and press them 
while the cider ran out of a spout at one side. If there were worms in the apples, 
no one ever complained. Perhaps they only added flavor— or protein— to the drink." 

IN THE EVENING JOURNAL . EAST ST. LOUIS, Rube Yelvington pays a column of tribute to 
Wayraan Presley for making southern Illinois tourism a reality "rather than a topic 
of conversation. "...Mel Luna, also in the JOURNAL, had a first-rate "depth" piece on 
"The Monroe Doctrine In Today's World. "..Says editor Bill Boyne: "Zoning must come 
to every community as it develops. The sooner it comes, the easier it is to make 
the adjustment and to avoid serious mistakes in community planning." 

THE iaNMUNDY VALLOWS streaked up to Neenah, Wise, to visit son Carl and family, 
pausing overnight to visit son Joe and family in Minonk, the town which the Densons 
hold in a vice- like grip. Brother Vallow relates: "We broke away from the old home 
town and the hum-drum of our daily routine Thursday pee-em, after loading three months 
supply of wearing apparel in the royal chariot and turning her nose northward. It 
had been rather lonesome around the old mansion the fore part of the week because 
Frieda Hildagard (our dog) was spending her vacation in St .Anne with Mary Annette, 
our youngest granddaughter. I tell you right now, those two girls are inseparable 
when they are near one another. • .In the planning of our week-end vacation, it was 
decreed Frieda would be much better off in St .Anne than she would be in the car, 
traveling for a distance of 475 miles. Her habits are such that we can't trust her 
on too long a trip." 

HEAD IN CASEY DAILY REPORTER: "Civil Air Patrol Sponsors All Night Sing"... Trying to 
keep up with the angels.. .Tim Turner, HARRISBURG REGISTER, tells of some papers found 
in a desk at a second-hand furniture store. • .One item showed that a Mr. Fowler had 
contributed to the Lincoln Highway Association in 1913... There was a Burlington Route 
of about the same vintage which Grandma Allen at Clay City may recall... Contributions 
for those early "routes" probably paid for painting markers on telephone poles... Tim 
tells also that after a nurse had broken her engagement to a young doctor, he sent he 
a bill for 46 visits. -30- 



The Carhondole Rotarian 



I rbondale Rotary Club 



Meets Every Wednesday Noon at the Elks Club 
Charter Club No. 743 - May I, 1920 



Vol. 5 No. 21 



November 26, 1962 



A FEW ROTARIANS to the contrary, water is important i Iri fact, we may some day be a 
have-not nation in water resources unless we act now^ to conserve our water resources. 
If you want to learn more about this important subject plan to be on hand Wednesday 
when Joseph P. Vavra will talk on "Soil and Water Conservation in Illinois." 

LAST WEEK the highlight of the talk was cancelled for lack of time when ye editor 
had planned to demonstrate his dexterity with chopsticks. As it was, like an 
Egyptian mummy- -pressed for time--we confined our remarks to a discussion of how we 
look to others. 

COL. MAC NEEDS TO KNOW how many persons you are planning to bring to the big Christmc 
party on December 13 at the University Center. It isn't that he is curious about ya 
social schedule, but the University Center wants to know how many cows to butcher foi 
the big event. We need to be on our toes for this one as it would look bad if the 
host club is outdone by our neighbors in attendance. The Murphysboro Club plans to 
have at least 60 members and Rotary-Anns on hand and the latest flash from Herrin is 
that at least 45 will be with us from the Herrin Club. So, if you did not put in 
your reservation last Wednesday, call Col. Mac or Secretary Jim. Be sure to bring 
your own (or somebody else's Rotary Ann with you) and it would be in the Christmas 
spirit if you buy a ticket for one or more foreign students too. 

A BIG ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM is being planned for this gala event with international 
stars. District Governor Norman Beck and his good Rotary Ann will be on hand, as 
will Dr. and Mrs. Delyte W. Morris. Where is there a bigger bargain for three lousy 
bucks ? 

WE SLIPPED LAST MONTH . The rarified hights of ranking 14th in attendance in Distric 
651 was too much for us last month and we slipped back down to 25th place in the 
attendance standings with an average of 84.59. HOWEVER, we can take pride in the 
fact that we now are tied for second place in the district in total membership. 
Belleville is still the largest club in the district, but we are tied with East St. 
Louis in second place with 71 members. It is interesting to note that we now out- 
number another club in Carbondale, which shall be nameless here. 

WE SHARED OUR THANKSGIVING last week bv l-akin* un a collficMfln fm- r.ARR aftor i-h» 






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The Carbondole Rotarian 

Carbondale Rotary Club Meets Every Wednesday Noon at the Elks Club 

Charter Club No. 743 - May I, 1920 



Vol. 5 No. 21 November 26, 1962 



A FEW ROTARIANS to the contrary, water is important! Ill fact, we may some day be a 
have-not nation in water resources unless we act now to conserve our water resources. 
If you want to learn more about this important subject plan to be on hand Wednesday 
when Joseph P. Vavra will talk on "Soil and Water Conservation in Illinois." 

LAST WEEK the highlight of the talk was cancelled for lack of time when ye editor 
had planned to demonstrate his dexterity with chopsticks. As it was, like an 
Egyptian mummy— pressed for time— we confined our remarks to a discussion of how we 
look to others. 

COL. MAC NEEDS TO KNOW how many persons you are planning to bring to the big Christmr 
party on December 13 at the University Center. It isn't that he is curious about ya 
social schedule, but the University Center wants to know how many cows to butcher foi 
the big event. We need to be on our toes for this one as it would look bad if the 
host club is outdone by our neighbors in attendance. The Murphysboro Club plans to 
have at least 60 members and Rotary-Anns on hand and the latest flash from Herrin is 
that at least 45 will be with us from the Herrin Club. So, if you did not put in 
your reservation last Wednesday, call Col. Mac or Secretary Jim. Be sure to bring 
your own (or somebody else's Rotary Ann with you) and it would be in the Christmas 
spirit if you buy a ticket for one or more foreign students too. 

A BIG ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAM is being planned for this gala event with international 
stars. District Governor Norman Beck and his good Rotary Ann will be on hand, as 
will Dr. and Mrs. Delyte W. Morris. Where is there a bigger bargain for three lousy 

bucks? 

HE SLIPPED LAST MONTH . The rarified hights of ranking 14th in attendance in Distric 
651 was too much for us last month and we slipped back down to 25th place in the 
attendance standings with an average of 84.59. HOWEVER, we can take pride in the 
fact that we now are tied for second place in the district in total membership. 
Belleville is still the largest club in the district, but we are tied with East St. 
Louis in second place with 71 members. It is interesting to note that we now out- 
number another club in Carbondale, which shall be nameless here. 

WE SHARED OUR THANKSGIVING last week by taking up a collection for CARE after the 
luncheon. The money collected was donated in the name of the club. 

OUR MEMBERS DO GET AROUND . Honors for having traveled the greatest distance to 
attend a Rotary meeting lately goes to Roye Bryant, who visited the Columbus, Ohio 
club on November 5. Herb Settle gets the runner-up prize for attending two meetings 
of the Springfield, Mo. club. Making up at Herrin recently were Harry Curtis and 
Gene Stafford. Willis Swartz tried hard to make up there but after driving to Herri 
found the club did not meet that day. John Armstrong and Charles Southard were 
visitors at the Murphysboro club. Gordon A. Parrish and Carl A. Parrish made up at 
the Harrisburg club. Dr. E, L. Sederlin was a visitor at the DuQuoin club. Ken 
Miller spoke at a meeting of the Marion club on November 8, 

WORTH QUOTING : We borrowed this one from the "Rotary Bit" of Mexico, Mo.: "The 
Rotarian who visits another Rotary Club has been properly received when he goes away 
determined to visit that club again. Are you doing your part to make visitors feel 
that way about our club?" 

HEARD IN PASSING : America's new definition of democracy— the freedom to vote for 
the Kennedy of your choice... The Marion Rotascope reminds us that "Capital punishmen 
is when the government taxes you to get capital in order to go into business in 
competition with you, and then taxes the profit on your business in order to pay its 
losses. 1 '. ..Sign for ladies observed at a highway stand, "Want to get rid of ugly 
fat—divorce him." 

POSTSCRIPT : Don't forget to make your reservations now for the Christmas party and 
plan to bring a student with you. Let's get into the Christmas spirit. 



Service Ofoove Self - 3te CProfiis ~Mosl (Who Serves Jjed 



CARBONDALE ROTARY CLUB — 1962-63 



VICE-PRESIDENT 

Max Sappenfield 



GOVERNOR DIST. 651 PRESIDENT 

Norma,n Beck . . . Tom Easterly 

DIRECTORS: Frank Gumm,- Ken Miller, Max Sappenfield, Bob Vokac 
PAST DISTRICT GOVERNOR: Lester Webb PAST PRESIDENT: Harry Goldstein 

COMMITTEES 



SECRET AR Y-TRE ASU R I 

. Jim Mowry 



CLUB SERVICE 

Max Sappenfield, Director 
ATTENDANCE 

Bryan Kimmel, Chairman 
CLASSIFICATION 

Carl Birkholz, Chairman 
CLUB BULLETIN 

Bill Lyons, Chairman 

FELLOWSHIP - 
SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 

John Q. Clark, Chairman 
MAGAZINE - 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Roye Bryant, Chairman 
MEMBERSHIP 

Clyde Winkler, Chairman 
PROGRAM 

Max Sappenfield, Chairman 
AUDITING 

W. B. Crane, Jr., Chairman 
MUSIC 

George Hand, Chairman 
LEGISLATION 

Herb Settle, Chairman 
HISTORY 

John Allen, Chairman 



Name Nickname 

Abbott, Talbert W. (Abbott) 
Adams, Geor-ge W. (George) 
Armstrong, John M. (John) 
Birkholz, Carl K. (Carl) 
Bryant, Roye R. (Roye) 
Budslick, William (Bill) 
Bushee, Ralph W. (Ralph) 
Campisi, Paul J. (Paul) 
Clark, John Q. (John) 
Clayton, Charles C. (Charley) . 
Crane, William B., Jr. (Bill) 
Crocker, D. R. (Don) 
Curtis, Harry C. (Harry) 
Easterly, Thomas A. (Tom) 
Eddings, W. L. (Tinner) 
Feirich, Charles E. (Charley) 
Fisher, Harvey I. (Harvey) 
Frazer, C. A. (C.A.) 
Gallington, Ralph O. (Ralph) 
Goldstein, Harry S. (Golde) 
Gray, Ralph (Ralph) 
Gumm, Frank L. (Frank) 
Hamblen, John W. (John) 
Hand, George H. (George) 
Hoffman, Paul M. (Paul) 
Hosley, Neil W. (Neil) 
Joseph, R. C. (Joe) 
Keith, Malcolm Robert (Bob) 
Kimmel, Bryan (Bryan) 
Kimmel, Philip (Phip) 
Klingberg, Frank L. (Frank) 
Koonce, Harry (Harry) 
Lee, W. D. (Doug) 
Long, Howard R. (H.R.) 



VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

Frank Gumm, Director 
BUYER-SELLER- 
COMPETITOR-RELATIONS 

Henry J. Rehn, Chairman 
EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE 
RELATIONS 

Curt Mann, Chairman 
FOUR WAY TEST & 
COMMUNITY 
GOVERNMENT 

Mason Parker, Chairman 
OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Neil Hosley, Chairman 



COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Kenneth Miller, Director 
YOUTH 

Paul Hoffman, Chairman 
COMMUNITY SAFETY 

James Wallace, Chairman 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Don Crocker, Chairman 
SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS & 
STUDENT LOANS 

Frank Klingberg, Chairman . 
STUDENT GUESTS 

Chuck Southard, Chairman 
INTER-SERVICE 
CLUB MEETINGS 

A. R. MacMillan, Chairman 



ROSTER 



Membership or Classification 

Senior Active 

Edu. — History 

Gas & Oil, Wholesaling 

Art Goods — Retailing 

Senior Active 

Motor Courts 

Edu. — Library 

Edu. — Sociology 

Edu. — High School Principal 

Edu. — Journal Publishing 

Accounting Service 

Christianity — Prostestantism 

Senior Active 

Decorating materials— Retailing 

Heating Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Zoology 

Edu. — - Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Industrial Education 

Men's Furnishings — Retailing 

Real Estate Agency 

Associations — YMCA Director 

Edu. — Computing Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Marketing 

Edu. — Forestry 

R.R. Transp. — Dispatching 

Plastics - — Mfg. 

Petroleum — Production 

Taxi Service 

Edu. — Government 

R.R. Transp. — Div. Supt. 

Television — Service 

Edu. — i Journalism 



Name Nickname 

Mann, Curt F. (Curt) 
Mars, John T. (John) 
McKeefery, William J. (Bill) 
McRoy, Paul F. (Paul) 
Miller, Kenneth R. (Ken) 
Mowry, James B. (Jim) 
Murray, Glen H. (Glen) 
Murrie, B. J. (B.J.) 
Nagel, William E. (Bill) 
Neunlist, Dempsey V. (D.V.) 
Parker, H. M. (Mason) 
Parrish, Carl A. (Cap) 
Parrish, Gordon A. (Gordon) 
Pulley, Charles (Charles) 
Rehn, Henry J. (Henry) 
Renfro, Louis F. (L.F.) 
Sappenfield, Max M. (Max) 
Sederlin, Elvin L. (E.L.) 
Semar, Preston 
Settle, Herbert B. (Herb) 
Southard, Charles (Chuck) 
Stafford, Eugene (Gene) 
Swartz, Willis G. (Bill) 
Swick, Ralph D. (Ralph) 
Veath, Irose J. (I. J.) 
Vokac, Robert B. (Bob) 
Wiegand, G. Carl (Carl) 
Winkler, Clyde V. (Clyde) 
Allen, John W. (John) 
Davis, Robert W., (Bob) 
Dill, John D. (John) 
Hodge, John R. (John) 
Jordon, Roy V. (Roy) 
. Lentz. E. G. (Gib) . 



INTERNATIONAL SERVK 

Robert Vokac, Director 
INTERNATIONAL 
CONTACTS 

Howard Long, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Paul Campisi, Chairman 
ROTARY FOUNDATION 

Wilis Swartz, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
STUDENT PROJECTS 

Ralph Bushee, Chairman 






Membership or Ciassificatio 

Men's Clothing — Retailing 

Banking — Savings 

Edu. — Admin. Acad. Aff 

Broadcasting Services 

Edu. — University Admin. 

Horticulture — Research 

House Furniture — Retailir 

Building Construction 

Edu. — Tech. Adult Edu. 

Comercial Photography 

Elec. Light & Power Service 

Insurance — Life 

Milk — Distributing 

Edu. — Architectural Servic 

Edu. — School of Business 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Government 

Public Health 

Loans — Auto Financing 

Highway Eng. Utilities 

Edu. — Student Counseling 

Ins. — Health and Hospital 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Accounting 

Sporting Goods — Retailing 

Edu. — Placements 

Edu. — Economics 

Past Service 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorarv 



~ 



.|/£ 



From Bill Lyons 11 - 26 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Four guest soloists will appear with a 200 voice 
choir at Southern Illinois University Dec. 1 and 2 for the annual SIU Christmas 
oratorio program. 

Under the direction of Robert Kingsbury, SIU choir conductor, the complement 
of University, area and professional musicians will present Handel's "Messiah" 
at 7:30 p.m. Saturday and again at 3 p.m. Sunday. Both programs will be in 
Shryock Auditorium and will be free to the public* 

Accompanying the University Choir and Southern Illinois Oratorio Society 
chorus will be Wesley Morgan, organist, and members of the Southern Illinois 
Symphony Orchestra. 

Soloists will be Teresa Orantes, soprano; Evelyn Reynolds, contralto; 
Lawrence Lane, tenor; and William Taylor, baritone. Miss Orantes, Miss Reynolds 
and Lane are prof ess ional Chicago singers. Taylor is a member of the voice faculty 
at SIU and a frequent soloist in opera and concert appearances in the south and 
midwest. 

Student soloists will be featured in a program of "Messiah" excerpts Thursday 
(Dec. 6) for student convocation audiences at SIU. 



-pb- 



_S . . CARBONDALE ROTARY CLUB — 1962-63 . 

GOVERNOR DIST. 651 PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Norman Beck . . Tom Easterly Max Sappenfield 

DIRECTORS: Frank Gumm,- Ken Miller, Max Sappenfield, Bob Vokac . . 

PAST DISTRICT GOVERNOR: Lester Webb PAST PRESIDENT: Harry Goldstein 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 
. Jim Mowry 



COMMITTEES 



CLUB SERVICfi 

Max Sappeofield, Director 
ATTENDANCE 

Bryan Kimmel, Chairman 
CLASSIFICATION 

Carl Birkholz, Chairman 
CLUB BULLETIN 

Bill Lyons, Chairman 
FELLOWSHIP - 
SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 

John Q. Clark, Chairman 
MAGAZINE - 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Roye Bryant, Chairman 
MEMBERSHIP 

Clyde Winkler, Chairman 
PROGRAM 

Max Sappenfield, Chairman 
AUDITING 

W. B. Crane, Jr., Chairman 
MUSIC 

George Hand, Chairman 
LEGISLATION 

Herb Settle, Chairman 
HISTORY 

John Allen, Chairman 



Name Nickname 

Abbott, Talbert W. (Abbott) 
Adams, George W. (George) 
Armstrong, John M. (John) 
Birkholz, Carl K. (Carl) 
Bryant, Roye R. (Roye) 
Budslick, William (Bill) 
Bushee, Ralph W. (Ralph) 
Campisi, Paul J. (Paul) 
Clark, John Q. (John) 
Clayton, Charles C. (Charley) . 
Crane, William B., Jr. (Bill) 
Crocker, D. R. (Don) 
Curtis, Harry C. (Harry) 
Easterly, Thomas A. (Tom) 
Eddings, W. L. (Tinner) 
Feirich, Charles E. (Charley) 
Fisher, Harvey I. (Harvey) 
Frazer, C. A. (C.A.) 
Gallington, Ralph O. (Ralph) 
Goldstein, Harry S. (Golde) 
Gray, Ralph (Ralph) 
Gumm, Frank L. (Frank) 
Hamblen, John W. (John) 
Hand, George H. (George) 
Hoffman, Paul M. (Paul) 
Hosley, Neil W. (Neil) 
Joseph, R. C. (Joe) 
Keith, Malcolm Robert (Bob) 
Kimmel, Bryan (Bryan) 
Kimmel, Philip (Phip) 
Klingberg, Frank L. (Frank) 
Koonce, Harry (Harry) 
Lee. W. D. (Doug) 
Long, Howard R. (H.R.) 
Lyons, William H. (Bill) 
MacMillan, AlexanderR. (Mac) 



VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

Frank Gumm, Director 
BUYER-SELLER- 
COMPETITOR-RELATIONS 

Henry J. Rehn, Chairman 
EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE 
RELATIONS 

Curt Mann, Chairman 
FOUR WAY TEST & 
COMMUNITY 
GOVERNMENT 

Mason Parker, Chairman 
OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Neil Hosley, Chairman 






COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Kenneth Miller, Director 
YOUTH 

Paul Hoffman, Chairman 
COMMUNITY SAFETY 

James Wallace, Chairman 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Don Crocker, Chairman 
SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS & 
STUDENT LOANS 

Frank Klingberg, Chairman 
STUDENT GUESTS 

Chuck Southard, Chairman 
INTER-SERVICE 
CLUB MEETINGS 

A. R. MacMillan, Chairman 



ROSTER 



Membership or Classification 

Senior Active 

Edu. — History 

Gas & Oil Wholesaling 

Art Goods — Retailing 

Senior Active 

Motor Courts 

Edu. — Library 

Edu. — Sociology 

Edu. — High School Principal 

Edu. — Journal Publishing 

Accounting Service 

Christianity — Prostestantism 

Senior Active 

Decorating materials— Retailing 

Heating Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Zoology . 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Industrial Education 

Men's Furnishings — Retailing 

Real Estate Agency 

Associations — YMCA Director 

Edu. — Computing Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Marketing 

Edu. — Forestry 

R.R. Transp. — Dispatching 

Plastics • — Mfg. 

Petroleum — Production 

Taxi Service 

Edu. — Government 

R.R. Transp. — Div. Supt. 

Television — Service 

Edu. — i Journalism 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Transportation 



INTERNATIONAL SERVICE 

Robert Vokac, Director 
INTERNATIONAL 
CONTACTS 

Howard Long, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Paul Campisi, Chairman 
ROTARY FOUNDATION 

Wilis Swartz, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
STUDENT PROJECTS 

Ralph Bushee, Chairman 



Name Nickname 

Mann, Curt F. (Curt) 
Mars, John T. (John) 
McKeefery, William J. (Bill) 
McRoy, Paul F. (Paul) 
Miller, Kenneth R. (Ken) 
Mowry, James B. (Jim) 
Murray, Glen H. (Glen) 
Murrie, B. J. (B.J.) 
Nagel, William E. (Bill) 
Neunlist, Dempsey V. (D.V.) 
Parker, H. M. (Mason) 
Parrish, Carl A. (Cap) 
Parrish, Gordon A. (Gordon) 
Pulley, Charles (Charles). 
Rehn, Henry J. (Henry) 
Renfro, Louis F. (L.F.) 
Sappenfield, Max M. (Max) 
Sederlin, Elvin L. (E.L.) 
Semar, Preston 
Settled Herbert B. (Herb) 
Southard, Charles (Chuck) 
Stafford, Eugene (Gene) 
Swartz, Willis G. (Bill) 
Swick, Ralph D. (Ralph) 
Veath, Irose J. (I. J.) 
Vokac, Robert B. (Bob) 
Wiegand, G. Carl (Carl) 
Winkler, Clyde V. (Clyde) 
Allep, John W. (John) 
Davis, Robert W., (Bob) . 
Dill, John D. (John) 
Hodge, John R. (John) 
Jordon, Roy V. (Roy) 
Lentz, E. G. (Gib) . 
Smith, Clyde L. (Clyde) 



Membership or Classification 

Men's Clothing — Retailing 

Banking — Savings 

Edu. — Admin. Acad. Affair* 

Broadcasting Services 

Edu. — University Admin. 

Horticulture — Research 

House Furniture — Retailing 

Building Construction 

Edu. — Tech. Adult Edu. 

Comercia! Photography 

Elec. Light & Power Service 

Insurance — Life 

Milk — Distributing 

Edu. — Architectural Service 

Edu. — School of Business 

Senior Active 

Edu. ■ — Government 

Public Health 

Loans — Auto Financing 

Highway Eng. Utilities 

Edu. ; — Student Counseling 

Ins. — Health and Hospital 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Accounting 

Sporting Goods — Retailing 

Edu.. — Placements 

Edu.' — Economics 

Past Service 

Honorary 

Honorary . 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 



AREA ROTARY MEETINGS— 






Monday Noon — Centralia, Harrisburg, Herrin, New Athens, O'Fallon 

Monday Evening — Cairo, Chester, Cisne, Columbia, Freeburg, Golconda, Mt. Carmel, Olncy, Pinckneyville, W. Salem 

Tuesday Noon — Albion, Belleville, Chicago, Eldorado, Mt. Vernon, Urbana, West Frankfort , , 

Tuesday Evening — Benton, Carmi, DuQuoin, Flora, Murphysboro, Sparta, Waterloo, Wayne City 

Wednesday Noon — Carbondale, East St. Louis, Johnston City, Lebanon 

Thursday Noon — Anna, Carlyle, Fairfield, Lawrenceville, Marion, Metropolis, St. Louis 

Thursday Evening — Marissa, Mascoutah, Nashville, Zeigler 

Friday Noon — Louisville, Salem 

Friday Evening — Crossville, Millstadt 



+/£ 



From Bill Lyons 11 - 26 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — Four guest soloists will appear with a 200 voice 
choir at Southern Illinois University Dec. 1 and 2 for the annual SIU Christmas 
oratorio program. 

Under the direction of Robert Kingsbury, SIU choir conductor, the complement 
of University, area and professional musicians will present Handel's "Messiah" 
at 7:30 p.m. Saturday and again at 3 p.m. Sunday. Both programs will be in 
Shryock Auditorium and will be free to the public. 

Accompanying the University Choir and Southern Illinois Oratorio Society 
chorus will be Wesley Morgan, organist, and members of the Southern Illinois 
Symphony Orchestra. 

Soloists will be Teresa Orantes, soprano; Evelyn Reynolds, contralto; 
Lawrence Lane, tenor; and William Taylor, baritone. Miss Orantes, Miss Reynolds 
and Lane are professional Chicago singers. Taylor is a member of the voice faculty 
at SIU and a frequent soloist in opera and concert appearances in the south and 
midwest. 

Student soloists will be featured in a program of "Messiah" excerpts Thursday 
(Dec. 6) for student convocation audiences at SIU. 



-pb- 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11 - 26 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — John C. Frye, Urbana, chief of the Illinois 
Geological Survey, will speak at Southern Illinois University Tuesday evening 
(Dec. 4) under auspices of the SIU geology department. 

SIU Geologist Frank J. Bell, chairman of arrangements, says Frye will compare 
the geology of the pleistocene period in the southern Great Plains and Illinois,, 
The period cooresponds to the ice age in Illinois. 

Called a geology seminar, the meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m. in Room 132, 
SIU Agriculture Building. Geologists and other interested persons in the area 
may attend, Bell says. 



-am- 






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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 26 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — A capsule history of Illinois* role in the second 
year of the Civil War (1862) and pictures of 26 award winning junior historians 
are featured in the November issue of Illinois History, a publication of the Illinois 
State Historical Library, It is printed by Printing Service, Southern Illinois 
University, Carbondale, 

The lead article, by Helene Levene, Springfield, research director for the 
Civil War Centennial Commission of Illinois, reveals 12 Illinois soldiers received 
the Congressional Medal of Honor for bravery during military engagements in 1862, 
During that year most Illinoisans' participation in the war was in the states of 
Tennessee, Missouri and Arkansas, Turmoil was the word for the political scene at 
Springfield, where a constitutuional convention was revamping the 1848 Illinois 
Constitution, 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 

ATTENTION: School page editors 



SO , 11 - 26 - 62 

f X Release: IMMEDIAT 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Dental Hygiene, a program for training persons to 
relieve busy dentists of certain duties, has entered its second year of operation 
in the Southern Illinois University Vocational Technical Institute. First started 
in September, 1961, with eight students, the new program now has 32 students enrolled. 

Dr. Karl K. Webber, a licensed dentist and VTI associate professor of dental 
technology supervising the program, says dental hygienists are the only persons in 
auxiliary dental health fields licensed to work in the mouth under the supervision 
of practicing dentists. Persons meeting the rigid requirements can clean and 
polish teeth, make X-ray examinations, assist dentists at the chair, perform some 
laboratory functions, carry on dental health education and serve as receptionists 
or office administrators in dental offices. 

The VTI program's two-year course of study has been arranged to meet standards 
set by the American Dental Association's Council on Dental Education. The Council 
is responsible for inspecting and accrediting dental hygiene programs. Webber says 
the VTI program will be inspected for accreditation early next year. An advisory 
committee of representatives from dentists and dental auxiliary groups has been 
established to maintain liaison with the Southern Illinois District Dental Society. 

Second year students have started their three terms of clinical practice on 
patients in the VTI dental hygiene laboratories under the close supervision of 
faculty members, Webber and Mrs. John Paulk, a licensed dental hygienist. After 
completing requirements for their Associate in Technology degree from SIU, students 
must pass an examination administered by state dental examining boards for licensing 
before entering any field of dental work. The SIU program also includes study in 
basic sciences, such as physiology, anatomy, pathology and microbiology, as well 
as study in the dental phases of pharmacology, nutrition, ethics and X-ray. 

-more- 



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Southern's dental hygiene program is one of approximately 40 in the United 
States. The 1,000 graduating annually are only sufficient to replace those leaving 
practice, Webber says. He predicts double the nation's present 3,000 practicing 
dental hygienists will be needed by 1975, compounding the present high demand for 
qualified persons in this field. 

Second year students usually have promises of employment before graduation. 
Most of them enter private practice to work under the direction of dentists, but 
many also enter the public health field under civil service or take dental health 
education positions in public school systems. 

Persons entering the VTI program must meet the university's general admission 
requirements and have satisfactory scores on a dental hygiene aptitude test 
offered on campus three times annually under auspices of the American Dental 
Hygienists Association, High school work in chemistry, physics, biology, business, 
speech and Latin is especially helpful for students planning to study dental 
hygiene, Webber says. 



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Three advanced dental hygiene students at Southern Illinois University's 

Vocational Technical Institute begin supervised clinical practice on patients in 

the VTI's newly-equipped laboratory. Students from left are: Miss Linda Fletcher, 

Areola; Miss Linda Skaggs, Harrisburg, and Miss Nancy McClain, Carbondale. 

Mrs, John Paulk, standing at rear, a licensed dental hygienist, is the supervising 

faculty member. Patients in chairs (all SIU students) are, from left: Thomas Towld, 

Chicago Heights; Sylvia Fabrega, Santiago, Panama; and Darrell Bryant, Carbondale. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11 - 26 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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From Bill Lyons \L/ 11-27-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE , ILL. , Nov* — Tournament action on four campuses throughout the 
nation faces Southern Illinois University's debate squad this weekend Nov. 30-Dec. 1. 

The major events will be the University of Pittsburgh Invitational in the east 
and the Air Force Academy Invitational at Colorado Springs. At Pittsburgh, SIU 
debaters Richard Fulkerson, Carbondale, and Phil Wander, Bloomington, x*ill preview 
the tournament by teaming against a Pitt twosome in a series of seven exhibitions 
Thursday and Friday at public high schools in the city. SIU is one of six nationally 
prominent debate schools invited by Pittsburgh to participate in the year-long 
schedule of matches for prep audiences* 

Barbara Ellmore, Easton, and Glenn Huisinga, Calumet City, will compete at 
the Air Force Academy meet. The field is made up of schools with top ranking 
performances in last year's tournament. 

SIU debate coach Jack Parker will send teams of freshmen to both the Greenville 
111., College Tournament and the Butler, Ind., Novice Tournament the same days. 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 27 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-227 S Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — Carols, Christmas greetings, plays, and traditional 
performances are in store for listeners of Southern Illinois University's WSIU 
radio and for viewers of WSIU-TV (Channel G) during the Christmas holidays. 

WSIU radio will feature numerous Christmas specials, highlighted by the 
Sunday (Dec, 2, 3 p.m.) broadcast of SIU's production of "The Messiah," and another 
presentation of "The Messiah" by the Mormon Choir of Independence, Mo. at 3:30 p.m. 
Dec. 23. 

Television viewers will also get a holiday of special programs, highlighted 
by the Christmas Eve (C:30 p.m.) motion picture, "The Christmas Carol," starring 
Reginald Owen as Scrooge. . 

Other WSIU radio offerings include Metropolitan Opera presentations of 
Der Rosenlcavalier, Dec. 22, and Pelleas et Melisande, Dec, 29; Christmas greetings 
from SIU president Delyte U. Morris; broadcasts of the Christmas Assembly Dec. 13; 
the Dec. 6 Christmas sing; Dec. G Christmas dance; and a week full of carols, plays 
and specials Dec. 10-25, including Barbara Britton in a series of programs, a 
special from Paris about "Christmas in France," and the Roger Wagner Chorale. 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist y 11 - 27 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY <\T ' 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Hoping to match or improve upon last year's fine 
showing at the Illinois Invitational meet, Southern Illinois University will 
enter 14 wrestlers in Saturday's opening classic at Champaign. 

Two of Southern's three defending champions will lead this year's group 
which Coach Jim Wilkinson has tabbed "one of our better teams." 

Frank (Chico) Coniglio, Oak Lawn, and Don Millard, Pekin, will be shooting 
for repeat titles in the 130 and 167-pound divisions while Eric Feiock, New 
Albany, Ind., and Larry Kristoff, Carbondale, both of whom were third a year ago, 
will seek championships in the 157-pound and heavyweight flights. 

Iz2y Ramos, E. Providence, R.I., will represent the Salukis in the 115-pound 
division, Terry Finn, Oak Lawn, in the 123, Terry Appleton, Evanston, and 
Pat Coniglio, Oak Lawn, in the 147, Bill Hartzell, Overland, Mo., in the 177, 
Irv Johnston, Elgin, in the 191 and Roger Plapp, DeKalb, in the heavyweight group. 
SIU's two 137-pound entrants have not yet been determined. 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



i • 






11 - 27 - 62 
Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov, — Southern Illinois University will be represented 
by three teams in this weekend's opening gymnastics meet, the Midwest Open at 
Chicago, 

Coach Bill Meade will enter veterans Fred Orlofsky, Rusty Mitchell, 
Bruno Klaus and Tom Geocaris along with sophomore standouts Dennis Wolf, Bill Hladik 
and Steve Pasternak as varsity squad members while SIU will also have a freshman 
team entered as well as a Saluki Club group, 

Orlofsky, Klaus and Mitchell have all won NCAA championships at one time or 
another while Geocaris placed second last season to Michigan State's still rings 
sensation Dale Cooper. Wolf claimed the National Jr. AAU all-around title a year 
ago and is expected to provide depth to Southern's squad along with newcomers 
Hladik and Pasternak, 

The Salukis placed second £a the <ThTcago Turners in last year's Midwest Open 
and Meade is anticipating strong competition again this weekend from the defending 
champs as well as Michigan and Michigan State, 



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southern WWiS TOYSRsm 1 ? ±%£ footfall statistics (io-game totals) 



Team Statistics 



nrst Downs 



By Rushing.., 

By Passing.., 

By Penalties, 

Totals..., 



Sin DJPP. 



95 


96 


41 


21 


—2 


-ia 


145 


129 



Rushing 



Times Carried...... 

Yards Gained 

Yards Lost ......... 

Net Yards Gained... 
Avg. per try 



Passing 



Attempts 

Completions ..... 
Had Intercepted. 
Net Yards Gained 

Touchdowns 

Avg. per comp... 



SIU OPP . 

461 457 
1838 1973 

176 223 
1662 1750 
3.6 3.8 



SHI PIP. 



172 
60 
17 

780 

4 

13 



136 

54 

20 

610 

4 

11,3 



Penalties 



Number 

Yards Penalized.... 



SHI GEE. 



69 
618 



55 
495 



Fumbles 



Number, 
Lost , • , 



SIU p^P. 



Punting 

SIU 

Number Punts .,,,.,.... 45 

Punts Blocked • 

Yards Punted.... 1571 

Avg. per punt. ........ 35 

Punt Returns 

SIU 

Number • • . • • 18 

Yards Returned 170 

Avg. per return 9.4 

Kickoff Returns 

sm 

Number 29 

Yards Returned 664 

Avg. per return 23 

Season Record CA-6) 

Texas A . & 1 10 

Drake 13 

Central Michigan. 43 

Hillsdale 13 

Lincoln. , 13 

Illinois State 14 

Northern Michigan. .... 9 

Fort Campbell 7 

Bowling Green......... 

North Texas State _2P- 

Totals. 152 



PPP. 

47 
2 

1649 
34 



£PP. 

20 
272 
13.6 



PP£. 

32 

453 
14 



P££. 

14 

14 

6 

6 





14 

14 

21 

144 



31 

21 



22 
10 



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Individual Statistics 






Rushine 


Yards 


Yards 




Punting 

No. 


Yards 








&j&. 


Gainefl tot MX teg.. 


Punts Kicked 


Ayg. 


Chas. Hamilton 120 


453 


3 450 


3.8 


Dave Bolger... 43 


1489 


34.6 


Carl Kimbrel.. 78 


381 


13 368 


4.7 


Chas. Hamilton J&. 


_8£ 


a& 


Chas. Warren.. 73 


370 


23 347 


4.8 




1571 


35.0 


Chas. Lerch... 50 


190 


13 177 


3.5 








Dennis Harmon. 32 


107 


11 96 


3.0 


Punt Returns 






Jerry Frericks 25 


69 


1 68 


2.7 


Ua. 


lard? 


AV£. 


Dave Harris... 20 


89 


40 49 


2.5 








Irv Rhodes.... 9 


48 


48 


5.3 


Pete Winton.... 10 


123 


12.3 


Pete Winton... 8 


31 


3 28 


3.5 


Chas. Warren... 1 


9 


9.0 


Dave Bolger... 3 


2Q 


28 


9.3 


Harry Bobbitt . . 3 


18 


6.0 


Ken Boyken.... 3 


15 


15 


5.0 


Dennis Harmon.. JL 


20 


?,o 




10 


10 


3.3 




170 


9.4 


Vern Pollock.. 37 


47 


69 -22 


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1838 


176 1662 


3.6 


Kickoff Returns 

Ua. 


Yards 


teg.* 


Passing 


















Had Yards 




Dennis Harmon. 13 


381 


29.3 


Mi. 


Como. . 


Inter. Gain. 


TD 


Chas. Warren.. 10 
Jim Minton.... 2 


214 
33 


21.4 
16.5 


Vern Pollock. 123 


44 


11 563 


2 


M. Krawczyk... 1 


14 


14.0 


Dave Harris.. 48 


16 


6 217 


2 


Chas. Lerch... 2 


22 


11.0 


Dennis Harmon 1 











Bill Lepsi.... _i 


_J2 


JLSL 


172 


60 


17 780 


4 




664 


23.0 


Pass Receiving 








Pass Interceptions 










Yards 




Harry Bobbitt 7, Pete Winton 4 




Comp. 


Gained 


IP. 


Dennis Harmon 3, Rich. Slobodnik 3, 
Chas. O'Neill 1, Jim Thompson 1, 




26 


364 


1 


Irv Johnston 1. Total 20. 






12 


149 


1 










4 


101 


1 


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5 


50 





3eprw 

1 


Pt. ? Pt. Tbt. 




4 
3 


42 
20 







TDs Extra Extra FG Pts. 




2 


20 


1 


Vern Pollock.. 4 





24 




1 


12 





Chas. Hamilton 3 


1 


20 


Chas. Hamilton..,. 


1 


10 





Pete Winton... 3 





18 


Gene Rodriguez.... 
Bonnie Shelton.... 


1 
JL 


7 
_5 






Bobby Hight... 
Carl Kimbrel.. 2 


9 
2 


3 18 
16 


Totals 


60 


780 


4 


Chas. Lerch... 2 
Jim Battle.... 2 


1 




14 




12 










Chas. Warren.. 1 





6 










Jerry Frericks 1 





6 










Bill Lepsi.... 1 





6 










Harry Bobbitt. 1 





6 










Chas. O'Neill. JL 


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9 4 


3 152 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist 11 - 27 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Three of Southern Illinois University's top four 
scorers had unusual offensive credentials this season, having a composite rushing 
record of only six yards, as the Saluki's first year as an athletic independent 
proved to be their first losing campaign since 1956. 

Quarterback Vern Pollock, although winding up the season in the red, was 
Southern's top scorer with 24 points while Pete Winton, who carried the ball only 
eight times, and one-armed place-kicking specialist Bobby Hight shared third-place 
honors with 18 apiece. 

Pollock, a senior from DeSoto, Mo., scored all four of his touchdowns on 
short runs and finished with a minus 22-yard rushing figure. Winton, a defensive 
specialist, gained just 2G yards in his brief offensive appearances and Hight was 
in action only on kick-offs, point-after-touchdowns and when attempting field goals. 

Uinton, Williamstovm, Mass,, junior, scored his three touchdowns on a 40-yard 
pass interception return, a 53-yard punt return and on a 20-yard pass play. Hight, 
a former Centralia prep star, successfully kicked nine of 12 extra point attempts 
and three field goals of 34, 41 and 39 yards. 

Runnerup in Southern's scoring race was Charles Hamilton, Herrin, with 20 points. 
Hamilton, a senior, also led the Salukis in rushing with 450 yards in 120 attempts 
for an average of 3.8 yards per try. 

Southern closed its season Saturday with 55-30 loss to North Texas State and 
as a result was forced to settle for a final 4-6 record. In three previous seasons 
at SIU while competing in the Interstate Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, 
Coach Carmen Piccone guided the Salukis to 5-4, G-2 and 7-3 marks. His overall 
record of 24-15 still qualifies him as Southern's winningest football coach with 
.615 percentage. 

Southern's final statistics follow: 






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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11 - 27 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE , ILL. , Nov, — The fourth issue of Parallax, a quarterly 
art-literary magazine published by Southern Illinois University students, will 
go on sale Tuesday (Dec, 4), Prank Moreno, editor, announced today. 

The issue will feature an article by R, Buckminster Fuller, SIU research 
professor, on "Common Integrity of Science and Painting," 

Other highlights, Moreno said, include a guest editorial by Clement Blakeslee, 
SIU sociologist on "The Challenge of the Corporate Mentality;" poems by 
Walton Wesley of Anna; a short story; and an allegory, "Job in a Cave," by 
Peggy Brayfield, Carterville, a graduate assistant in the SIU English department. 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 27 - 62 

H 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY .j ^ 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 , u Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Southern Illinois University opens its annual 
Christmas Week celebration Saturday (Dec. 1) with a play, presentation of the 
"Messiah" and a dance. 

Other events scheduled for the week include a Christmas sing, assemblies and 
a donut hour with President and Mrs. Delyte W. Morris. 

The play, "Shepherd of the Hills" will be presented in the University 
Playhouse at C p.m. Saturday (Dec. 1) through Saturday (Dec. 0). 

The Messiah will be presented Saturday (Dec. 1) at 0:15 p.m. in Shryock 
Auditorium and again Sunday (Dec. 2) at 3 p.m. The Christmas dance will begin at 
9 p.m. Saturday (Dec. 1) and continue until 1 a.m. 

The Christmas Sing will begin Sunday (Dec. 2) at 7:30 p.m. on the patio of 
the University Center. 

The President's donut hour is scheduled in the Olympic Room of the University 
Center from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Monday, (Dec, 3). On Tuesday (Dec. 4) at 6 p.m. in 
the University Center a record concert will be held and the Christmas assemblies 
will be held Thursday, (Dec. 6) at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. in Shryock Auditorium. 

Co-chairman Joel M. Travelstead of (663 Niagara Falls) Buffalo, N.Y., and 
Kenneth R. Hansen of Elwood, 111., said members of the Christmas Week steering 

committee include: 

ALLISON PARK, PA.: Elaine Ochenreider, 2C0C College Park Drive, secretary 

BELLEVILLE: Trudy K. Kulessa, 310 West H St., publicity; Oliver J. Rhein, 
112 North 02nd St., assembly 

CARBONDALE: Carol Feirich, 003 U. Pecan, sing 

CENTRALIA: Ann Mabry Strawn, 961 East Broadway, dance 

CHICAGO: Barbara M. Kokta, 3100 Lake Shore Drive, dance; Kathryn A. Lindbloom, 
2249 West 91st, campus decorations; James J. Eroncig, 1473 Uest 72nd 
Place, publicity; Martin H. Newman, 2317 Uest Granville, programming 

GRANITE CITY: Louis A. Sucich, 2002 14th, campus decorations 

HIGHLAND PARK: Jo Ann Jaffe, 100 Sheridan Road, programming 

JACKSONVILLE: Patricia A. Dean, 1237 Parnassus Place, secretary 

MULKEYTOUN: Bonnie T. Garner, assembly 

MURPHYSBGRO: Terry G. Hamilton, 1911A Walnut, donut hour 

MT. VERNON: Linda A. Goss, 4 Evergreen Drive, donut hour 

PONTIAC: Phillip A. Ruppel, 409 C. Will, sing 

SPRINGFIELD: Julia A. Bucari, 1624 North Fifth, programming. 

-jh-as- 



From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 

ATTENTION: Farm Editors 



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11 - 27 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CAR30NDALE, ILL., Nov. — A Michigan utate University dairy extension specialist, 
Donald Hillman, and an American Jersey Cattle Club program director, Guy M. Crews, 
head the list of speakers for Southern Illinois University's eighth annual Dairy 
Day Tuesday (Dec. 4). 

Dr. Howard H. Olson, SIU dairy specialist in charge of the program, says milk 
composition and dairy cattle feeding programs will be the main topics for discussion. 
Activities will begin with registration at 9:30 a.m. in the SIU Agriculture Building 
Muckelroy Auditorium. Olson asks dairy farmers attending the meeting to bring 
a four-ounce sample of milk from their dairy herd for testing of protein and 
nonfat solids content. 

Crews, speaking at the morning session, will discuss the need and possibilities 
for pricing milk according to protein and nonfat solids content rather than 
butterfat. Hillman will report on heavy grain feeding experiments to increase the 
milk production of dairy cows. 

Also on the program will be Olson; David Wieckert, a new dairy specialist on 
the SIU faculty; Harry Eaton of Quincy, specialist with a feed manufacturing firm; 
and Richard Bernett, SIU graduate student in dairy cattle nutrition. 

-am- 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — The American Dairy Association of Illinois will hold 
a district meeting for southern Illinois dairy farmers and their wives in the Southerr 
Illinois University Agriculture Building's Muckelroy Auditorium Thursday (Dec. 6), 
beginning at 10:30 a.m., says Lawrence F. Deitz, DeSoto dairy farmer and state ADA 
director. The ADA is a promotional organization financed by dairy farmers and the 
dairy industry. In addition to ADA management reports on the year's activities, 
promotion plans for the coming year, and a movie on physical fitness and nutrition, 
there will be election of a state director and seven district directors for the 
coming year. -am- 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11 - 27 - 62 
Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — Back on the campus from a Thanksgiving concert tour 
to six area churches and the Illinois State Farm at Vandalia, the Chapel Singers 
from the Baptist Student Center at Southern Illinois University are changing their 
tunes to Christmas carols. 

This 34-voice chorus will form the nucleus for a band of carol singers who will 
serenade the local hospitals and shut-ins of the community Dec. G. 

The recent tour took the student singers to Baptist churches in Carbondale, 
Mt. Vernon, Vandalia, Jacksonville, Granity City and East St. Louis. 

The Chapel Singers are composed of the following students who are enrolled 
in SIU and in the Baptist College of Bible: 

ANNA— Karen Cain, alto. 

CARBONDALE- -Martha Davis, soprano; Oleta Barrow and Judith Harbison, altos; 
Robert Barrow, Larry Brown and Douglas Horner, tenors; John Crenshaw and Len Morris, 
basses. 

CHESTER— Sue McCann, soprano and Pam Kennedy, alto. 

ELIZABETHTOWN— Clara Woo ten, soprano. 

ELLIS GROVE— Lynn Montroy and Royce Ragland, sopranos, 

ENFIELD— Fred James, tenor. 

FAIRFIELD— Mary Jo Brock, alto; Leslie Pappas, bass. 

HIGHLAND— Richard Schwoerke, bass. 

JACKS ONVILLE— Clyde {Jerries, bass. 

JONESBORO— Margie Vines, alto. 

LOUISVILLE— Ann Clifton, soprano. 

METAMORA— Norma Barrow, soprano. 

MT. VERNON— Fred Beckmeyer, bass. 

OLNEY— Tom Eggley, tenor. 

PEORIA— Faye Andrews, alto; Gary Grigg, tenor. 

STEELEVILLE— Ruth Ann Kuhnert, soprano. 

SESSER— Janice Thompson, soprano. 

ZEIGLER— J ami Rollo, soprano; Monty Knight, tenor. 

CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO.— Noble Harrison, bass. 

HARDINSBURG, KY. ,— Suzanne Farrar and Sharon Farrar, altos. 

WHITTIER, CALIF.— Martha Jackson, alto. ^-, 









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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



-f ( k, 



11 - 27 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Hov. — Nurses are in great demand but male nurses are at 
a premium, so Dale Wayne Martin of Carrollton, a sophomore nursing student at 
Southern Illinois University here, feels he has the world as his oyster, 

In fact, love of travel was one of the factors that influenced Dale to choose 
nursing as a profession. 

"I think I'll probably go into foreign service of some kind," he said. "Of 
course, the Navy will likely see to that as soon as I complete my degree." Dale 
is already in the Navy reserve. 

A more significant reason for his choice of nursing, however, was the fact that 
he got some layman's experience attending his grandfather who was hospitalized for 
two months. He saw the pressure on an overloaded nursing staff and the urgent need 
for male nurses particularly, and liked the opportunity to be of service to the 
ill and injured. 

Dale recently went through the SIU department of nursing traditional "capping" 
ceremony which marks the eligibility of sophomore students to start clinical 
experience in hospitals— but, being a man, he received only a handshake from 
Dr. Virginia Harrison, chairman of the department, instead of the perky white cap 
his feminine classmates donned. 

During the next two and a half years, Dale will have supervised hospital 
experience in Doctors and Holden hospitals here, in the University of Illinois 
medical center in Chicago, in the psychiatric unit of Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, 
in the East Side Public Health District of East St. Louis, and in team nursing at 
St. Joseph Memorial Hospital, Murphysboro. 

Dale is working to earn part of his school expenses. He is employed in the 
X-ray laboratory of the University Health Service 15 hours a week and is also on 
assignment from the service to give medication to a quadriplegic student living in 
his dormitory. 

With a full class and laboratory load in the dpeartment of nursing and his 
half-time job with the health service, he has little time to indulge his hobby of 
pistol shooting, but does take part in social activities on the camnus. He acted as 
Homecoming decoration chairman for Brown Hall, hie own dormitory, and Steagall Hall 
for girls— won first place, too. -lj- 



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Dale VJayne Martin (left) of Carrollton, male nursing student at Southern 

Illinois University, works half-time in the University Health Service X-ray 

laboratory. Here he prepares a student for an X-ray under the supervision of 

Miss Leona E. Miller, X-ray technician. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11-27-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 






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From Bill Lyons ^ 11-27-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

SIU NEWS SUMMARY 
FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION 

Back on the S-I-U campus from a Thanksgiving concert tour to six southern 

Illinois churches and the Illinois State Farm at Vandalia, the Chapel Singers of 

SIU's Baptist Student Center are changing their tunes to Christmas carols. The 

34-voice chorus will form the nucleus for a band of carol singers who will serenade 

Carbondale hospitals and shut-ins Saturday (Dec. 3). 

* * * * 

A dental hygiene program for training persons to relieve busy dentists of 
certain duties has entered its second year of operation in Southern Illinois 
University's Vocational-Technical Institute. The first started in September, 
1960$; with eight students. There are now 32 students enrolled. The VTI's program 
consists of two years of study and is one of about 40 in the United States. 
Dr. Karl K. Webber, a licensed dentist and VTI associate professor of dental 
technology who's supervising the program, predicts that more than 16-thousand 
practicing dental hygienists will be needed by 1957. The demand, he said, already 

far exceeds the supply. 

* * * * 

The fourth issue of Parallax... a quarterly art-literary magazine published 
by Southern Illinois University students— goes on the stands Tuesday (Dec. 4). 
The issue includes an article by S-I-U research professor R. Buckminster Fuller 

on "Common Integrity of Science and Painting." 

* * * * 

A six-day schedule fo final examinations for the fall quarter starts 
December 12th at Southern Illinois University and winds up with the beginning of 
the Christmas recess. With the conclusion of exams on Tuesday, December 13th, most 
of the 16-thousand students on the Carbondale and Edwardsville campuses will head 
for home and a Christmas vacation extending to January 2nd. 

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S-I-U opens its annual Christinas Week celebration Saturday (Dec, 1) with a 
play, presentation of "The Messiah, 1 .' and a dance. Other events during the week 
include a Christmas sing, assemblies, and a doughnut hour with President and 
Mrs, Delyte (Delight) W. Morris. The play, "Shepherd of the Hills," will be 
presented in the University Playhouse at 8 p.m. Saturday through the following 
Saturday (Dec. 8). The Messiah will be presented Saturday at 3:15 p.m. in 
Shryock Auditorium and again Sunday at 3 p.m. The Christmas dance begins at 
9 p.m. Saturday. 

* * * * 

As most everybody knows, nurses are in great demand... but male nurses are at 
a premium. That's the viex* of Dale Wayne Martin of Carrollton, a sophomore 
nursing student at S-I-U* Martin recently went through the traditional "capping" 
ceremony which marks the eligibility of sophomore students to start clinical 
ejqperience in a hospital. But. . .being a man. . .Martin received only a handshake 
instead of the perky white cap his feminine classmates donned. 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist 11 - 27 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Despite the availability of nine lettermen, a pair 
of newcomers are expected to be in Southern Illinois University's lineup when the 
Salukis challenge St. Bonaventure at Buffalo, N.Y., Saturday night following their 
Friday opener at Gannon College. 

Southern's inaugural at Erie, Pa., will makr Jack Hartman's debut as head 
coach and the former Coffeyville (Kans.) Jr. College basketball boss is hoping to 
carry on right where he left off last year when his club compiled a perfect 32-0 
mark while on its way to a national championship. 

Although still not definitely decided on his starting five, Hartman is 
leaning toward a combination which would team two of his ex-Coffeyville stars, 
Paul Henry and Lou Williams, both of Indianapolis Ind., with SIU co-captains 
Ed Spila, Chicago, and Dave Henson, Dupo, and Eldon Bigham, Pinckneyville. 

Henry, selected as the outstanding player of the 1961-62 season in junior 
college ranks, is certain to be at a guard position while the 6-4 Williams has a 
slight edge over veteran 6-8 Frank Lentfer, Riverdale, at center. 

Also bidding for first-team berths are Harold Hood, a West Frankfort senior, 
junior guards Rod Linder, Central ia and Eddie Blythe, Carbondale, and forwards 
Joe Ramsey, Sandoval and Bennie Felton, Roxana. Rounding out Southern's varsity 
squad are lettermen Dan Corbin, Villa Grove, Dave Needham, Plainfield, Duane Warning, 
Frankfort and Thurman Brooks, Memphis, Tenn. 



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Two newcomers, Paul Henry (left) and Lou Williams, are expected to be in 

Southern Illinois University's starting lineup Saturday night when the Salukis 

challenge St. Bonaventure in Buffalo, N.Y., following their opener Friday at 

Gannon College. Henry and Williams, both former Indianapolis, Ind., prep stars, 

played last year for Coffeyville (Kans.) Jr* College where Southern's first-year 

coach, Jack Hartman, guided his club to a 32-0 record and a national championship, 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11-27-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11 - 23 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — Natives of Union County and Golconda will be 
featured as an "Alumnus of the Week" in the next two SIU News Review series over 
Southern Illinois University's WSIU-TV (Channel 8), it was announced today. 

The news series is telecast each Thursday night at 0:30, and features 
a distinguished SIU alumnus. 

Robert Rolla Hamilton, who won an SIU Alumni Award in 1960 for professional 
achievement, will be highlighted on the Nov. 29 program. Hamilton is nationally 
known for his work in public school law, and has acquired renown as a writer, 
speaker and consultant in legislation dealing with education. 

He was born in a log cabin in Union County, later served on the faculty of 
the University of Wyoming, 19 years of which he was dean of its College of Law. 
He is presently director of bar admissions for the State of Minnesota. 

The Dec. 6 program will feature Gen. John Reed Hodge, a native of Golconda. 
Hodge is a combat veteran of World Wars I and II and gained international 
reputation as military governor of South Korea. He has been honored by the Army, 

Navy and Air Force for his command positions at Guadalcanal, New Goergia, 

t 

Leyte and Okinawa. 



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From Bill Lyons 11-23-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — A former Kaskaskia Island resident, 
A. Wayne McDonald, is now a graduate student research assistant in the Southern 
Illinois University School of Agriculture. 

He performs 20 hours of research work weekly under the direction of an 
agricultural industries faculty member. 

McDonald is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew V. McDonald of Kaskaskia Island 
near St. Mary's, Mo. Studying toward a master's degree in agricultural economics, 
he came to SIU from Benton where he spent two years as assistant farm adviser 
for Franklin county. Previously he spent two years in Laos as an agricultural 
technician with International Voluntary Services organization, as well as five 
months in Sweden as an International Farm Youth Escchange delegate. He received 
his bachelor's degree from the University of Illinois in 1957. McDonald lives 
at 105 North University Ave. , Carbondale. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 28 - 62 



Release: TMMEDIATI 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — Amid the current outcry over potential dangers to 
man, beast and plant life from agricultural chemicals, two researchers at Southern 
Illinois University have discovered a strange twist. Bobwhite quail appear actually 
to thrive on one type of weed killer. 

Reporting in i! The Journal of Wildlife Management," SIU Zoologist Willard Klinistr. 
and Jay Bergs trand, a graduate student, describe how quail fed on pellets of "Dybar," 
a commercial herbicide, gained more weight in a 10-day trail than birds who were 
not given the pellets. 

In another test, birds given "Dybar" pellets mixed with regular food 
consumed them with no apparent discrimination. They also gained weight during the 
inves tigation. 

Examination of birds' internal organs and body fat after the tests showed a 
small residue of fenuron, the herbicide's active ingredient, in kidney tissues. 
Klimstra and Bergstrand said the birds' behavior and alertness remained constant 
throughout the experiment. 

On the basis of the study, the two conclude that speculation about "adverse 
effects" on quail from sustained doses of the chemical "are not warranted." They 
do say, however, that "only long-term experimentation can provide a complete picture 
of effects on wildlife. :! After the experiments, the SIU Cooperative Wildlife 
Research Laboratory, which Klimstra directs, used the herbicide to manage vegetation 
at its stripmine research area near Pyatts and reported no immediate effect on 
wildlife. 

Klimstra was the author of an earlier article in "Agricultural Chemicals" 
magazine warning of dangers to wildlife from pesticides administered without a 
coordinated program of research among private, state and federal agencies 
concerned with application. 



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A WELL MARKED BUCK— Using a long defunct model, field researcher Glenn Foolcs 

exhibits numbered collars and ear streamers being worn this fall by about CO wild 

deer in southern Illinois, The deer were trapped, marked and released at Crab 

Orchard Refuge during the summer as part of a Southern Illinois University-directed 

project to gather data on size and distribution of downstate Illinois' rapidly 

growing deer population. Any marked deer taken by hunters will have tags or collars 

recorded at check stations. Fooks works out of SIU's Cooperative midlife Research 

Laboratory. 

PHOTO BY KIOTO SERVICE 11 - 2G - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 




From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carboniale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 2C - 52 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARB0X7DALE, ILL. , Hov. -- An evaluation of the first year of teaching via 
television over Southern Illinois University's USIU-TV (Channel G) will be among 
iter.s on the program of the escecutive committee of the Southern Illinois 
Instructional Television Association when it meets at SIU Wednesday (Dec. 5). 

The meeting will start at 10:30 a.m. in the Mississippi Room of the 
University Center, according to Carl Planinc, educational television coordinator. 

The group also plans to work on scheduling four area meetings and the 
academic schedule for the second semester. 



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From Bill Lyons v a 11-20-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois -f - 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov, — Downs tate deer hunters may run across some strange 
looking specimens while they're stalking the woodlands with how and gun over the 
next month and a half. 

Not only white tails, but white collars will adorn these critters. Still others 
may have gaily colored plastic streamers fluttering from their ears. 

These gay blade bucks and dolled up does will be special participants in a 
long range research effort to find out just how big southern Illinois' burgeoning 
deer population really is, how the area herd is distributed and what kind of 
contributions deer are making to the total wildlife pattern in the region. 

Under the direction of Willard Klimstra, head of Southern Illinois University's 
Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory, a group of field researchers has been 
capturing, marking and releasing deer at the Crab Orchard Wildlife Refuge since last 
summer. The white collars and streamers are used for high visibility. 

Being carried out cooperatively with the Refuge Division, Bureau of Sports 
Fisheries and Wildlife, the field investigations will run- to 1965. Two of 
Klimstra' s graduate students, Glenn Fooks of Imboden, Ark., and Keith Thomas of 
Mt. Pleasant, la., are the chief workers. Since mid-summer they've collared and 
tagged some 00 deer and hope to mark at least 100 to provide the basic group for 
the study. 

All of the deer have been caught and released in the closed, or "inviolate" 
section of the Refuge. Many of them are bound to move out sooner or later, Klimstra 
says, and subsequent reports from hunters will afford clues to the Crab Orchard 
herd's dispersal throughout southern Illinois. That, in turn, will yield valuable 
food for analysis about the "population dynamics" of Egypt's resurgent whitetails. 

Illinois' six day shotgun season, running through Dec. 5, reflects a situation 

increasingly evident to area residents; there seem to be deer all over the place. 

It was that way in the 1000* s, too, but in 1901, the state legislature closed the 

season in the face of a rapidly diidndling population. The last native deer was 
recorded in southern Illinois in 1910, according to Klimstra. -more- 



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The state conservation department released some imported whitatails at the 
Horseshoe Lake area in the 1930' s and the U.S. Forest Service followed suit at 
Belle Smith Springs and Jonesboro in 1935 and 1936. A number of deer were rounded 
up at Horseshoe Island in the early 40' s and distributed throughout southern Illinois, 

The beginnings of the Crab Orchard herd were four does and two bucks released 
there in 1942 with permission from the Illinois Ordnance Plant (ordill) commanding 
officer. A followup census of the Refuge deer population has not been taken since. 

By 1957, the downstate deer herd was big enough to open a three-day shotgun 
season and another period for bow hunters. This year, as a measure to help check 
growing herd populations, the season has been lengthened to make it the longest 
in more than 60 years. The bow and arrow season started Nov. 16 and will go to 
Nov, 26, with a second installment running from Dec. 6 to Dec. 31, after gunners 
have left the field. 

Klimstra, his field workers and Refuge officials will be hoping for word from 
check stations, where any marked kills will be duly noted and reported. The 
collars, tags and streamers carry only a number, but each one will give a clue as 
to the e2iact movement of the deer when compared with the spot of the kill. 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 29 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — Herman M. Haag, Southern Illinois University 
professor of agricultural industries, will participate in a Kiwanis Leadership 
Training School in Chicago Sunday through Tuesday (Dec. 2-4) sponsored by the 
organization's Illinois-Eastern Iowa District board of trustees, Haag is the 
Kiwanis district chairman of agriculture and conservation programs. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 29 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — After more than a year in South Viet-Nam, 13 
Southern Illinois University educational advisors have scored three major successes. 
That's the report of John Anderson, director of research and projects at SIU after 
a flying visit to the delegation in Saigon. 

Operating under a million dollar government contract for a three year period, 
the group has been given the task of developing plant facilities, starting new 
programs and improving coursework at four normal schools for teacher training, and 
at Phu Tho Polytechnic in Saigon. One team of sis: specialists under Willis Malone, 
director of admissions at Southern, has been there since June, 1961, with the mission 
of training future elementary teachers. 

A second team of four teachers headed by Keith Humble, director of SIU's 
Vocational-Technical Institute, landed at Saigon four months later and this fall 
t*as joined by three more. Their job at Phu Tho is working with students who are 
in training to teach at three new vocational schools in the outlying country. 

Ail 13 live in Saigon, but the elementary education squad has to commute 
periodically to three "normals" outside Saigon. One of them is at Banmethuot, 200 
miles north, where mountain tribesmen will soon be learning how to run lathes and 
repair engines. 

Anderson said in the eventful first year the group has (1) achieved "remarkable 
support" from local teachers and officials; (2) persuaded the Ministry of Education 
to boost under-par teaching requirements; and (3) been picked by the Viet-Nam 
government to run a four-year program of training vocational technical teachers. 

The last request is tied in with another by Viet-Nam, that the original 
contract for SIU's services be extended another two years by the Agency for 
International Development. As it is, Anderson is looking for third year replacements 
since a two year tour of duty is all that current team members signed up for. 

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Anderson says the teams' achievements are all the more remarkable because the 
Viet-Hamese school system has been based traditionally on the French model. The 
government has had to accept some extensive revamping to go along with the newer 
ideas • 

Travel restrictions keep Saigon residents inside their guerilla-beleaguered 
city and this is the only complaint of the group, says Anderson. Some team members 
live in a guarded compound set up originally by a U.S. firm for its employes while 
others are located in walled houses near downtown Saigon. 

Under the AID contract, the team members get the same salaries they were 
earning in the States, plus "hardship post" pay set by the government. Other 
incentives include housing, but no food. 

Anderson rates the stiffening of teacher standards as the top SIU effort so far. 
Before they came, Viet-Nam required only nine years of schooling and a year at a 
normal institution for teacher qualification. Now it will take 11 years in the 
lower grades and "high school" plus two years at the teacher training level for a 
certificate. 

Demand for a normal education far exceeds fhe supply, Anderson reports. A new 
home economics program capable of handling 40 students drev; 1,C00 applicants. All 
but 40 were flunked out by the rigid examinations used in Viet-Nam to select 
candidates for certain school offerings. 

Working with Malone are Fred Armisted, former Harrisburg city schools 
superintendent; Elmer Ellis, on leave from East Texas State Teachers College; and 
William Bartlett, Mable Lane Bartlett, Harold Lerch and Alex Reed, all of the SIU 
faculty. 

Humble' s team includes John Griswold and Lelan Traylor of the VTI faculty; 
Willis Wagner, on leave from Iowa State College; Paul Paulsen of Battle Creek, Mich.; 
Christ Kordas of LaGrange; and Lewis Runkle, on leave from the Peoria city schools. 
All are technically SIU staff members. 

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From Bill Lyons 11 - 29 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-227S Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — More than 100 junior high school students and 
advisors will attend a one-day Southern District Junior Student Councils meeting 
at University School in Carbondale Saturday (Dec. 1). 

Chris Mercer, president of the University School Junior Student Council, 
said the meeting is designed to stimulate interest in schools where Junior 
Student Councils already exist and encourage formation of councils in other 
schools. He said a special effort would be made at the district meeting to 
provide information on the value of Junior Councils in the sixth, seventh, 
eighth and ninth grades. 

Loren B. Jung, assistant to the vice president on the Southwestern campus 
of Southern Illinois University, will address the main session at 10:15 a.m. on 
"Student Councils In Action." 

Group meetings for faculty and students will be held at 11 a.m. 

Opening session speakers at 10 a.m. include Mercer, Judy Heisler, a 
University school student; the Rev. Malcolm Gillespie of the Student Christian 
Foundation and W. Charles Southard, guidance director at University school. 

The meeting will close with reports on the group actions at noon. 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 29 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Nov. — Herbert R. Davies, former director of the Newspaper 
Society of Great Britain, X7ill serve as a visiting professor of journalism at 
Southern Illinois University during the spring quarter. 

He will conduct a graduate course on government and the press, and will also 
present lectures on the campus and in area cities. 

Davies joined the Bricish Newspaper Society in 1929, became general secretary 
in 1937 and was named director in 1942. The Society includes most of the daily 
and weekly papers in England, It advises members on newspaper production and works 
with government departments. 

At the request of Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain he was asked to prepare 
the British newspaper industry for a :! state of emergency prior to World War II." He 
helped prepare British newspapers for rationing, manpower problems and emergencies 
resulting from enemy action. Newsprint rationing continued until 1956. 

As Society director, Davies supervised work on new techniques, legislative 
reform, labor negotiations and other newspaper problems. He played a major role 
in establishing the Guild of British Newspaper Editors, and has been observer-member 
of the General Council of the Press in England since its beginning. 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 29 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phones 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

SIU COUNTRY COLUMN 
By Albert Meyer 

Bundles of Christmas trees are beginning to appear at retail shops across the 
country as the annual holiday season sales program picks up momentum. More than two 
million Christmas trees— mostly fresh evergreens— wi 11 be bought between now and 
Christmas to brighten Illinois homes for the holiday season. At least 90 per cent of 
them will come from other states and Canada. 

For this reason most families in the area will miss the enjoyable experience of 
going to a field of evergreens to select and cut a Christmas tree, or of buying a 
freshly»cut home grown tree at the local market, says Ernest Kurmes, Southern Illinois 
University assistant professor of forestry. In major Christmas tree production areas 
the evergreens may be harvested three or four months before the buying season starts 
in the retail market. Freshness is maintained by special handling and storage methods 
until the bundles of trees are delivered to the local markets. 

Kurmes says the local store operator often finds it impossible to keep the trees 
in a cool place with the base in contact with moisture. Consequently, trees may begin 
losing needles before they arc purchased and decorated to brighten the home. 

When to buy depends on the source of supply and when the tree will be put up and 

decorated. If the tree can be obtained from a tree farm in the area, purchase and 

cutting can be delayed until time to put it in the house, assuring a delightfully 

fresh Christmas tree. Outdoor markets receiving periodic shipments often can keep 

imported trees in good condition until sold, providing the buyer reasonable assurance 

of getting a well-shaped, fresh tree when he needs it. If using a downtown store as 
source, it may be desirable to purchase early to get the kind of tree desired while 
it is still fresh and store it outside in a bucket of moist sand or in a tree stand 
with a water container until time to place it in the house. Making a fresh cut across 
the base of the tree will make water absorption easier. 

The variety of tree to select is a matter of personal taste, Kurmes says. There 
are four groups often used for Christmas trees— cedars, pines, spruces and firs. Red 
cedars are native to the area and have pleasing shapes but have weak side branches 
which do not support heavy ornaments well. Pines may be grown locally but must be 
pruned during growth to have good shape. Scotch pines have the shorter needles; red 
and white pine, long needles. Spruces and firs usually are imported from other 
areas. -am- 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 29 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-227S Release: IMMEDIATE 

CARBONDALE, ILL. , Nov. — A wealth of source material for future historians and 
folklorists has been given to the Morris Library of Southern Illinois University by 
the man who has been a "walking encyclopedia 1 ' on southern Illinois for more than 
half a century. 

John W. Allen, World War I doughboy, former school teacher, historian, folklorist 
and newspaper feature writer, has effected a "trade" t*ith the library— giving the 
bulk of his personal library and files of original material to the library in return 
for working space and other facilities to continue his research and tjriting. 

Included in his gift are some 500 volumes, dozens of manuscripts, illustrated 
maps, thousands of pages of typed notes, letters, photographs, negatives and slides. 

"The published books, including Allen's own county histories of Jackson, 
Randolph and Pope counties, comprise a good basic collection on southern Illinois 
history and pioneer life," Ralph E, McCoy, SIU library director, said. "In addition, 
there are his manuscript histories of Hardin, Franklin, Saline, Hamilton and Monroe 
counties, and a number of published biographies and autobiographies of pioneer 
s outhern 111 inois ans . 

"He has made an outstanding collection of materials on slavery in southern 
Illinois, and has developed a group of illustrated historical maps of southern 
Illinois counties that are unique." 

Some of the rare Items in the Allen collection are original editions of "The 

History of the Ram Fleet," which worked out of Cairo during the Civil War; "The 

Outlaws of Gave- in-Rock," and "Breese's Report" of sessions of the Illinois Supreme 
Court for its first two decades. 

Among the hundreds of letters Allen has collected are one written by 
John A. Logan, Murphysboro Civil War general as he was caught in political crossfire, 
and another from an English settler in Wanborough, predecessor of Albion, which 
Allen says is vital to a sound evaluation of Morris Birkbeck, one of the founders of 
Albion and sparkplug of Illinois' crusade against slavery. 

Allen, formerly curator of the SIU Museum, in recent years has been engaged in 
writing feature articles on Southern Illinois history and folklore for area 
newspapers, disseminated through the University Information Service. He has completed 
a book on 'Legends and Lore of Southern Illinois," now in process of publication, and 
is finishing a-a illustrated historical map of southern Illinois up to the 3Gth 
parallel, soon to be ready for publication. -lj- 






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From Bill Lyons 11-29-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

Number 403 in a weekly series — "It Happened in Southern Illinois" — a series 
consisting of regional folklore and historical accounts suitable for feature, 
column, or editorial use. 

A CONFEDERATE PRISON CAMP 
By John W. Allen 
Southern Illinois University 

The midcentennial of the Civil War is nearing and people of southern Illinois 
are pausing to take note of the role that this section had in the conflict. For 
this purpose there are two interesting cemeteries in Alton. 

One occupies a small portion of the old city cemetery, the one having the 
Lovejoy monument. Union soldiers, members of the Alton garrison who died at that 
post during the war, rest in the plot. Watched over by the national flag floxim each 
day and one cannon like those they knew then, their graves are in ordered rows, 
marked by familiar appearing stones. Lettering on the stonework above the entrance 
says, "U.S. NATIONAL CEMETERY." 

The second cemetery is in North Alton. A thin black arrow on a white marker 
at the intersection of State and Rozier streets at the 2,300 block on State points 
west to the field where 1,354 known war dead are buried. They are a part, but only 
a part, of the prisoners who died there. Two words above the pointing arrow tell us 
that it is a "CONFEDERATE CEMETERY." 

A visitor to this burying ground is impressed with its simplicity. The usual 
array of monuments and gravestones is absent. In fact, only one marker is evident 
on the five-acre plot inclosed by a sturdy iron fence. Neither is the well-kept, 
hilly ground crowded with shrubbery or trees. 

The lone marker, a square stone shaft about 60 feet tall, stands a short distance 
within the north entrance gate. On the east side of the shaft, at its bottom there 
is an inscription telling visitors that the marker was: 

"ERECTED BY THE UNITED STATES TO MARK THE BURIAL PLACE OF 1,354 CONFEDERATE 

SOLDIERS WHO DIED HERE AND AT THE SMALLPOX HOSPITAL ON THE ADJACENT ISLAND 

WHILE PRISONERS OF WAR AND WHOSE GRAVES CANNOT NOW BE IDENTIFIED." 

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Four large bronze tablets, one on each side of the base beneath the shaft, 
carry the names of the 1,354 known dead. These names are arranged alphabetically 
and there are no indications of military rank. After all, why should it matter now? 

There is convincing evidence that this listing does not include nearly all who 
died in the prison or on the adjacent island, the same one toward which 
Abraham Lincoln and James Sheilds are said to have journeyed to fight a duel that 
happily did not take place. Skeletons unearthed in 1936 indicate that many, some 
say thousands, were buried on the island during the smallpox epidemic that raged at 
the prison in late 1863 and early 1864, reaching its peak in March of the latter 
year. 

It might be of interest to knot* something of the Alton penitentiary before it 
became prominent as a military prison. Completed and occupied in 1833, it was the 
first institution built by the state. It began with 24 prison cells. By 1857 this 
number had grown to 286. In 1847 Dorothy Dix, one of America's able advocates of 
prison reform, cited it as about all that was bad in prison management. By 1860 her 
efforts, joined by others, had influenced the building of a new penitentiary at 
Joliet. The one at Alton accordingly was abandoned. For some years the Alton 
prison had been leased to individuals who operated it. The lease still had several 
years to run. This was the prison's status when war came. 

The army took over the abandoned penitentiary for a military prison and 
garrisoned it on February 1, 1962, The first consignment of prisoners arrived on 
February 9. By April 1 the number had reached 791. At its peak the number totaled 
5,000; 4,000 of whom were prisoners of war, the balance federal prisoners. Among 
the recorded admissions are the names of three women. One of these was paroled. The 
other two died in prison. 

Late in 1863 smallpox appeared among the prisoners. For a time its presence 
was kept secret. When it became known, something like panic resulted. Frantic attempts 
to escape were made, but few succeeded. 

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An isolation camp was established on the adjacent island. Records indicate 
that many hundreds were sent to the island, with no record of their return. Guards, 
prisoners and surgeons being sent to the island looked upon the assignment much 
like one of death. When one !:nows that massed burials of 60 guards and prisoners 
together were made in a common grave, they could hardly be blamed. The peak of 
the scourge was reached in March 1064. After that, conditions improved somewhat, 
but still remained grim. 

Shortly after war's end, the prison became only a cluster of buildings wrapped 
in horrid memories, along with many rows of crudely marked graves. For many years 
it was not unusual to see some man wandering pensively about, evidently engrossed 
in thoughts of the time when he was a prisoner of war there. 

Why doesn't someone write the full story of the Confederate prison at Alton? 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



SO 



11 - 30 - 62 

Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Dec, — Advance registrations for a writers conference, 
to be held at Southern Illinois University Saturday (Dec. G), have come in from 
nine area towns, according to James L.C. Ford, conference director. 

Writers and would-be writers from West Frankfort, Carbondale, Fairfield, 
Sparta, Murphysboro, Du Quoin, Carterville, Marion and Vienna have already 
registered. 

Deadline for reservations has been extended to Wednesday, Dec. 5, Ford said. 
Reservations, together with the $7.50 fee which includes luncheon, should be 
mailed to the Extension Division, SIU. 

Speakers and discussion leaders for the conference include Anne West of 
Carterville and Marion, fiction and factual article writer; Ethel Strainchamps, 
Missouri free-lance writer; Charles D. Neal, SIU faculty member, and Ford, the 
conference director. 

The conference, jointly sponsored by the University journalism department, 
the extension division and Theta Sigma Phi, women's journalism fraternity, will 
be held at the Faculty Club, south of the University Center. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




iJ 



11 - 30 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Observing a tradition dating back to his fourth 
year in office, Southern Illinois University President Delyte W. Morris will 
read the Christmas Story at a Christmas Assembly Thursday (Dec. 6). 

The program will be staged at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., regular convocation 
hours, in Shryock Auditorium. In addition to the president's recitation from 
the Book of Luke, it will include carol singing with audience participation, 
Vaughn-Williams' "Fantasia on Greensleeves" by the University Symphony, the 
Air Force ROTC Singing Squadron singing "Silver Bells," and nine selections 
from the "Messiah" by the University Choir and areawide Oratorio Chorus. 

Student soloists for the "Messiah" selections will be Denice Jos ten, 
Crete, soprano; Deanna Stevenson, Salem, mezzo-soprano; Robert Knight, Zeigler, 
tenor; and James McHaney, West Frankfort, baritone. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 30 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec, — ''Democracy Speaks Many Tongues," a book by a 
Southern Illinois University research professor, Richard W. Poston, will be 
required reading for 90 Peace Corpsmen currently in training at the University 
of Oklahoma, it was announced today. 

Poston is lecturing to the group Wednesday and Thursday (Dec. 5-6). 

Another SIU official, Richard Franklin, director of the Community Development 
Institute, discussed community development's role in the Peace Corps in an 
earlier lecture to the Bolivian-bound volunteers. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUIHEBN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




11 - 30 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — A 12-weeks Instrument Rating Ground School will be 
offered at the Southern Illinois Airport near Carbondale by the Southern Illinois 
University Division of Technical and Adult Education, according to 
Harry B. Bauernfeind, assistant dean of the division. 

The short course will be helpful to persons planning to take the Federal 
Aviation Agency's instrument rating written examination, he said. Only persons 
holding a private pilot's certificate for completing certain ground school work 
may enroll. 

Registration will be at 7 p.m. Thursday (Dec. 6) at the airport. Class 
sessions will be from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Thursdays, beginning with the evening of 
registration. Costs will be $5 tuition and $G.50 for books and supplies. Veterans 
qualifying under the Illinois Military Scholarship program may be exempt from 
tuition. 

Donald Boma, a member of the airport staff, will teach the course. Additional 
information may be obtained from the airport or from the SIU division's office in 
Carbondale. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



Si 



11 - 30 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dee. — Southern Illinois University has joined 212 other 
universities in the United States offering scholarships to qualified African 
students. Southern is providing tuition and fees for five young men from Southern 
Rhodesia, Nyasaland, Kenya, Nigeria and Tanganyika for the 1962-63 school year. 

African students attending Southern under the program are Aubrey C. Museka 
of Southern Rhodesia; Seliadi G. Beza of Nyasaland; Amos A.H. Muthui of Kenya; 
Nehemiah H. Onyeaka of Nigeria and For tuna tus L. Masha of Tanganyika. Mac ha is 
studying journalism. Onyeaka, general agriculture, Museka, art, Beza, government 
and Muthui, education. 

Their home governments paid transportation costs in most cases; SIU paid their 
tuition and fees; and the Agency for International Development of the U.S. 
government provides a maintenance allowance. 

This is the first school year Southern has participated in the African 
Scholarship Program of American Universities (ASPAU) which is designed to 
supplement higher education in sub-Sahara Africa. The programs started in 1960 
with 24 students from one country; expanded to 266 students from 13 countries 
in 1961 and this year has 503 students from 24 countries studying at 213 American 
schools. 

The Experiment in International Living agency arranges for each ASPAU 
student to live with an American family for one month after arrival in this 
country and before beginning his college education. During the trip to America 
the students receive orientation on American social, economic, political and 
educational practices from the Council on Student Travel. 



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From Bill Lyons 11 - 30 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Jack F. Isakoff, professor of government at 
Southern Illinois University, is one of 35 political, academic and administrative 
officials invited to participate in the fifth Illinois Assembly on the Office 
of the Governor, Dec. 6 and 7 at Robert Allerton House near Monticello. 

The conference will deal with aspects of the chief executive's role and that 
of state government within the federal system, 

Isakoff was research director for the Illinois Legislative Council for 
22 years and last year was assistant to the state attorney general. He is currently 
heading a year-long research study for the Illinois Council of Economic Advisors. 



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TAKING PART in the first year of the African Scholarship Program of American 

Universities at Southern Illinois University are these five undergraduate students 

from sub^Sahara Africa, Seated, left to right, are: Aubrey C. Museka of Southern 

Rhodesia; Seliadi G. Beza of Hyasaland; and Amos A.H. Muthui of Kenya. Standing, 

left to right are: Nehemiah H. Onyeaka of Nigeria and Fortunatus L. Masha of 

Tanganyika. SIU provides tuition and fees and their maintenance is provided 

by the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID). 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 11-30-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: H-JMEDIATE 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



11 - 30 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec, — A six day schedule of fall term final examinations 
starts Dec. 12 at Southern Illinois University and winds up with the beginning 
of Christmas recess. 

Examination periods will be in blocks of four each day throughout the 
schedule for three, four and five-credit hour courses. Exams for one and two 
hour courses will be given during the last regularly scheduled class of the 
term. 

With the conclusion of exams on Tuesday, Dec, 18, most of the 16,000 students 
on both the Carbondale and Edwardsville campuses will head for home and a 
Christmas vaction extending to Jan, 2, when the winter term begins. 



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No. 454 December 1, 1962 

S. I. E. A. NEW SLITTER 

KATIE BLANCHARD . GILLESPIE NEWS, responding to our charges that she may have bought 
Christmas decorations out of town, says that's a dog- gone lie because she made the 
deal with the NEWS' biggest advertiser, adding, "We believe in what we print"... So 
there you have it, and the Newsl. ed is fairly well left dangling.., Katie wrote on 
the edge of a Newsl. page (following a rather well-established pattern— and indicating, 
possibly, the closeness of the margin on which some papers operate.),.. Said she was 
terribly rushed what with it being Thanksgiving week and having to print two news- 
papers. "Or did you know we're printing the CALHOUN HERALD for Carl Wittmond?"... 
No, we did not, but we're glad you're keeping that expensive new press busy so that 
you won't go broke— as some predict every time you buy new machinery.. .However, 
instead of buying more equipment next summer, we suggest you print vacation issues 
ahead of time and take a nice trip. You don't need the trip, but think how much 
pleasure there would be in getting back to the work! 

JUDGE DEAN BUNTING . ALBION JOURNAL-REGISTER, lost in the election— which is a fine 
thing. Now he can devote full time to newspapering without taking time out to judge 
his readers •• .Brother Wittmond, mentioned above, reports that after one candidate 
was defeated at the polls, he ran this notice in a local newspaper: "I wish to thank 
all those who voted for me in the recent election. My wife wishes to thank all those 
who voted against me." 

ROSES to Preston Mathews, son of Tom, WAYNE COUNTY PRESS, whose engagement to Miss 
Rita Harlan, formerly of Fairfield, has been announced. Preston attended the U. of 
I. and Murray State and is now employed at the PRESS •••The Christmas season is upon 
us. The mailman came bearing gifts this a.m. from, yes— E. Jacquin, the Voice of 
Olin. It's really something when your old boss remembers you instead of trying to 
forget. 

JIM WELLS . NEWTON PROGRESS-MENTOR, had a bumper crop of "Harvest Values" display ads. 
•••Don't know how the merchants made out, but Jim will be able to buy coal all winter 
•••The P-M carried good pix of burning rail cars following a 22-car pile-up near 
Newton* • .Another recent lead story was on the dedication of a 77- acre prairie chicken 
sanctuary near Newton, named in honor of R. E. Yeatter, long-time biologist with the 
Illinois Natural History Survey... Bet YOU haven't had a prairie chicken story for a 
lead. 

MICHAEL SLOAN FRAZER waighed in at Ik pounds at the home of his parents, the Dave 
Frazers, LAKELAND, Fla«, Sunday, Nov. 25, much to the delight and relief of at least 
two of his grandparents, the C. A. Frazers. "Cap" was so pleased, in fact, that he 
passed out cigars at Rotary— on the day the Newsl. ed was absent! 

THE CENTRALIA SENTINEL will publish a centennial edition May 28, Vince Van Cleave 
"revealed" in reporting an announcement attributed to Bill Joy. . .Advertisers had been 
alerted earlier when they were feted at a free dinner designed to soften them for a 
special ad campaign about to be launched by Lee Hooker, ad mgr. 

ON THE MT. CARMEL DAILY REPUBLICAN-REGISTER, a superior job is being done with the 
high school page. Excellent features and pix, although some of the news leads might 
be imp roved... Joe Johnson, the ad copy and layout man, just might be closely related 
to Frank Johnson, R-R business manager. The R-R classified section is headed 
"Person to Person." •••Russell Maxwell of the EVENING JOURNAL, East St. Louis, had an 
A-l page of pictures showing what a group of 68 citizens on tour saw of river front 
business activities •••Rube Yelvlngton of the JOURNAL was "guide" for the tour and Gene 
Dorsey, general manager (JOURNAL) and president of the East St. Louis Chamber of Canne tc e, 

Compiled by Information Service, Southern Illinois University, for the Southern 
Illinois Editorial Association, the Newslitter is made possible because of the extent 
to which area editors include Information Service on their mailing lists, (more) 



Page 2 

A. E. VANDEVER . FREE PRESS- PROGRESS: "The cannibals stoked up the fire under the pot 
in which an explorer was being cooked. The chief came up and asked, 'Do you have 
anything to say?,.. 'Yes, ' said the explorer, 'I'm smoking more now and enjoying It 
less. :t ... "The man whose main desire when a lad was to wear long pants, got his wish. 
No one in the block wears them longer than he does •"•••"Label on a fish box in an 
express office. 'If not delivered in 10 days, never mind '."•.. Walter Fricke, FP-P: 
"A wife, reading her husband's fortune-weight card: 'It says you are brave, strong- 
willed, easy to get along with and a knockout with the opposite sex. Hmmmmm, it has 
your weight wrong, too J'" 

TOM, BLISS j MONTGOMERY NEWS: "Two Pauls may think I have become senile and should ask 
Pete if he has room for a reporter in his mid- fifties. From the way I goofed Monday 
the two Pauls may be right* I made an Ondrey out of an Unger and brought the wrong 
Paul home from the hospital, •• My prevaricating friend Ted Mangner has taken to the 
air to subtly Insult my larynx* In announcing that he would return to Hillsboro for 
Farmers' Day at Sears next Jan. 12, the KMOX farm editor stated that I would appear 
with him, not as his straight man but as a singer. Ted, so he said, has arranged for 
me to sing 'Sweet And Low' and 'Far, Far Away. '...If I could be insulted I would 
challenge the hog caller to a basso rendition of 'I'm An Old Cowhand.'" 

TOM PHILLIPS . PANA NEWS- PALLADIUM: "The boss told the writer a fib. He said his 
typewriter is equipped with a ribbon that takes care of mistakes. He being in St. 
Louis (colm written Saturday), we used his 'mill'... Don Pauschert, PN-P: "To be 
positive is to be mistaken at the top of your voice." 

NOLAND SEIL . GRAYVILLE MERCURY- INDEPENDENT: "Do You See Your Town As Others See It? 
... .Thoughtful persons have expressed concern about the source of political 
contributions and how much they influence the individuals selected. Wider disclosure 
of campaign contributions might be a help toward better government. If the public 
knows a candidate is greatly obligated, his campaign could be hurt." 

MARIE SHELTON. OBLONG ORACLE, urges readers "to know your Crawford Memorial Hospital, 
see the work that is being done, be informed so that you can help to tell others 
about this busy institution, and what it means to the health of the people in Crawford 
County." 

KEN IRISH . FARINA NEWS, was able to print his daughter's name "legally" since Becky 
appeared as "Fae", the record-playing daughter in the senior class play, "The Girl 
That I Marry "...Becky contributes high school news to the NEWS. 

ORIAN METCALF . MT. VERNON REGISTER- NEWS, took a dim view of life In general and certato 
authors in particular while enjoying a week of flu. However, he concluded that while 
he devoted most of two columns to gripes concerning H. Allen Smith's latest book, 
"To Hell in a Handbasket", it "moves on to be a wonderful volume. "...Also, "This isn't 
intended to be a book review. It's just that (the book), two penicillin shots and an 
assortment of antibiotic pills came out even."., .Here are some excerpts: "I had read 
everything in the house except the Autumn Journal of the Illinois Historical Society 
containing the S telle biography when my wife brought home Smith's latest book, 'To 
Hell In A Handbasket,' 

"Both of these Hamilton countians had literary careers, but boy— were they 
different • 

"OLD JOHN P .. who died in 1917 at the age of 71, was a Dahlgren farmer, teacher, 
editor of several McLeansboro papers, raised nine children, led national lost-cause 
movements and in the 1390's published The Progressive Farmer, a national weekly, at 
Mt. Vernon.... H. Allen Smith got bounced out of high school on his second day and 
after a few months of training as a chicken- picker and shoeshine boy got a job as a 
reporter on the Huntington daily newspaper. After a few years there and in Louisville, 
he worked on Florida papers and in Tulsa, before landing a job on the Denver Post... I 
don't know what there is about the ratified atmosphere of mile- high Denver that makes 
such good newspapermen and such good newspaper stories, but it does. 

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"ODR OWN EDITOR and publisher, J. Edwin Rackaway, took his early newspaper 
training on the Denver papers • His accounts of Rocky Mountain newshawking can match 
in spades anything Mr* Smith writes in this and his other books. 

"I could listen by the hour to Mr* Rackaway 's stories of rowdy police beats and 
and rough Colorado society and politics* Gene Fowler made a fortune and won literary 
fame relating his Denver lore. Al Or ton, Jim Coldsmith and the late Jumbo Sbean of 
the Chicago Associated Press had mines of rich Denver stories. 

"I DON'T KNOW why Mr. Smith feels the need to look down his nose at McLeansboro 
and Southern Illinois •• .but he always does.. .and he admits that no one in his home 
town ever claimed the honor of pulling him out of the well when he fell in as a small 
child. 

"In his 'Lo, The Former Egyptian, ' Smith acknowledged Mt. Vernon by mentioning 
that he wanted to read the WPA Guidebook about McLeansboro, but the library wasn't 
open here on the holiday. In the new book we are mentioned as being on the road to 
McLeansboro where he is still remembered by his relatives as the boy who ate wooly- 
worms... fie reports that his folks, like most others in the 'high echelons of 
McLeansboro society' had outdoor privies and then notes that the old home town has 
now changed and has a golf course, airport, new parks, schools and factory. 

..."He repeats Prof. Baker Brownell's published opinion of Southern Illinois: ... 
'The service is slow and poor. The soup, speckled with soot and other debris, is 
served with a stony look, a bump, and a somewhat greasy spoon. ' 

"That sooty soup probably gave Prof. Brownell his bilious outlook on the land 
that was feeding him, but I see no reason for H. to be concerned. Nearly all of our 
restaurants cook with gas nowadays and we ain't had much soot trouble lately, to the 
great concern of the big coal mine companies..." 

BAKER BROWNELL . one of Orian's flu victims, writes: "I am sorry we missed you when 
we were in Carbondale, but it was nice to get your note of November 2nd. Also your 
learned comment in the News litter. I wish I had seen your new house for I can 
imagine your problems in planning it. There would be I suppose a master suite for 
those dogs equipped with trees, bushes, a barber pole, and other plumbing. Then 
probably there would be a big gunroom adjoining a fishing tackle museum, also trophies. 
Probably your wife would insist on a kitchen but that could be most any place, say 
between the gunroom and the dog suite. 

"Charlie Felrich gave us a magnificent tour of the university and spent more 
than a full morning of his busy life doing it. We were glad to see President and 
Mrs. Morris; the growth and development of the University since we left leaves us 
practically speechless •• .Dick Poston gave me a copy of his new book which I shall 
read very soon. I am glad to hear about Vic Leiker. I read the quote about him in 
the News litter but did not realize how important he had become. 

"I am looking forward to John Allen's book. He tells me that it is on the way. 
P.S. And it's not Fair Hope but Fairhope, one word, named by its single taxer founders 
back in Iowa sixty or seventy years ago,". •• (Still a stickler for words, eh? Anyway, 
Baker, we're glad you don't live at Littlehope.) 

VIC HONEY formerly CAIRO EVENING CITIZEN and now with SIU writes: "As you frequently 
remark, 'There'll be letters,' here's one. 

"On page 3, News litter No. 452 commenting on your recent trip to Cairo you said, 
'Somewhere in the visiting we met again— Gene Aydt, accountant and part-time 
photographer.' So far we are on the same wave length. Gene is not only a part-time 
photographer, but a good part-time photographer; also a good accountant. Continuing 
you say 'who has a son at SIU.' I've towboated and newspapered with Gene for some 
twenty years. All along he insisted he was a bachelor. If true, he's probably 
surprised to learn he has a son at SIU. If not, he sure had me fooled! 

"I'll agree that Earl Jewell is an orator and an ad manager— good in both 
departments. In addition he has a son at SIU— David, a Junior. ••" (This is nothing, 
Vic. Once as a reporter I tried to give a priest a wifei)...Herschel Blazer, ALEDO 
TIMES RECORD, pictured his brother Paul being honored at Ashland, Kentucky when 6,000 
persons gathered for the formal dedication of the high school named for Paul. 

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GRESTON E. MILLER , associate editor of MENARD TIME, is the man Paul Simon mentioned 
who will be needing a job in January if he is to be released on parole. Says his 
plans for newspaper work are uncertain "since at this time I don't know who to turn 
to for help. "•••Check with John File or Warden Randolph... Just read the last Newsl.— 
and the line that says, "EveryONE.., turned THEIR clocks back". •••Carry on! 

PESCADOR . NEW ATHENS JOURNAL- PRESS: "Buzz Fischer and his young daughter, Barbara, 
were playing golf at the Waterloo Country Club the other evening, and they finally 
arrived at a lake.. .Technically, each golfer— even a beginner— is supposed to try to 
drive a shot across the lake, but Buzz was in an economical mood and he was sure that 
Barbara's drive would end in the lake. So he talked Barbara into letting him throw 
the ball across for her. He said he would make her count only one stroke for it. 

"She agreed, and you know what happened? The ball, thrown by our hero, landed 
in the lake, and Barbara was sworn to secrecy about the whole thing— especially where 
her mother was concerned. • .Buzz got the old double-cross, however, for that was the 
first thing Mrs. Fischer heard about when they were all together again." 

HARRY PORTER . HARDIN COUNTY INDEPENDENT, who, apparently, has recovered sufficiently 
to be doing a bit of writing again, has this sad story in his column: "Elsewhere in 
this week's Independent you will find a story about quail population improving in 
parts of Southern Illinois ••••The story probably is correct, but from reports some of 
the quail hunters around here are making S.I.U. *s research may be off a bit. 

"Most hunters in the county have not been too successful- -some have killed the 
limit by bunting all day long. A few may have been lucky and got the limit easily. 
Generally speaking, quail hunting has been poor so far. "... (Truer words were never 
spoken,) 

SHERM DOOLEN . SALEM TIMES -COMMONER: "A number of significant improvements have been 
made in Bryan Memorial Park and more are soon to come, thanks to the work of the 
Community Development beautification committee. 

"Through contributions of money for 'memorial trees' and proceeds from flower 
and bulb exchanges, such as the one held last Saturday, the committee now has enough 
for 22 trees .".. .Also, ..."The TIMES lists without charge anything of value to be 
given away". • .such as kittens, maybe. 

TOM LEE . MARISSA MESSENGER, may have scored a first when he continued a page 1 outline 
onto page 2... Guess we shouldn't jump a jovial, friendly, fishless fellow like Tom, 
but why does he have to use display space to encourage farmers to buy "NO HUNTING" 
signs?. • .Really, we've had lots of hunting— just haven't been finding much... Fe Hoy; 
told me the other day he had punished his dog, unjustly he learned, so he apologized, 
..Now give this some thought, how would you apologize to a dog???. ..By rolling on 
the ground? 

WARREN STRICKER had some good pix of a bad train wrack near Okawville.«Also on page 1 
pix of a stone marker erected 25 years ago on the site of the massacre of the John 
Lively family in 1913 •••Somebody must have escaped, because there was a John Lively 
who lived for many years in a shack at White Oak, a Marissa suburb. • .There were some 
who thought John was a bit touched in the head, but I always figured he was a lot 
smarter than his detractors. • .John sometimes didn't have a dime, but he didn't need 
much back in the days before taxes became so prevalent. He was an independent fellow, 
quite witty, and whenever he was stone broke, he would come to our house looking for 
odd jobs. There were a lot of big, soft maples in our yard, and after a severe storm 
one time that yard was full of branches large and small. John and I had the job of 
sawing this "timber" and carting it away. John that day was the happiest I ever knew 
him to be— pushing me back and forth on the end of a cross-cut saw. 

C.A. FRAZER observes: "Now I remember the 'shooting stick' very well. Had an old 

beat-up 'nickel-plated' one at the St. Anne Record which had been used for every kind 

of a prying job for years. I even tried to use it for its original purpose a few times 

on cast iron quoins although it was designed for use on wooden quoins. I never did 
see a hickory one," -more- 



. .! ; 



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1.1 ;. ..i. 



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Page 5 

C >C «GAHPDELL . CALHOUN MEWS, is running a series of excellent aerial photos of Calhoun 
County— and taking orders for copies to be supplied by the St. Louis photographer... 
Has an item about an Art Schulze bringing in a sweet potato with a broken bottle 
neck for a collar... Don't know who may have been conked by that bottle in the sweet 
potato patch. . .We do know that the Schulze mentioned was not Art Schulz of the 
PALESTINE REGISTER, an Irish potato man from 'way back.' 

ROY CONRA 3 , COLUMBIA STAR, had the best National Education Week pix we saw. Showed 
two shavers gazing at a high, high stack of books in a store window— the number of 
books the average child will use in 12 years of school. ..Norr is Vallow, KINMUNDY 
EXPRESS, who has spent a lot of time and money hauling his wife over the country, 
including Plymouth Rock, still can't figure out why the Puritans stuck around that 
place instead of going farther south where the land was better.. .Now, J. N., why 
have you stayed around Kinmundy when you have known all along that the grass was 
greener on the next hill? •• .Probably most of us stay in one place because we get 
set and don't want to get up. ••There will be letters. 

"MARRIED 100 YEARS" is the head Bill Schmitt used over TWO 50th wedding anniversary 
cuts in the MACOUPIN COUNTY ENQUIRER... Hate to mention this, but attention has been 
called to the fact that Hallowe'en pranksters somehow allowed the air to escape from 
all four tires on the Schmitt chariot. . .Back in the courting days of the Schmitts, 
Dee recalls that she would "take a tramp through the woods on Sunday afternoons ."... 
Now he has a suit and tie. . .Maybe clothes DO make the man. 

JOHN GLANZNER . TRENTON SUN: "I could have voted twice on a certain amendment because 
somebody ahead of me left a blank ballot in the booth. I was honest though and 
turned it in. I guess this person didn't know whether to vote yes or no. I wasn't 
any smarter, I admit, and there I was without a coin to flip. I could have solved 
the dilemma by keeping both ballots and voting yes on one and no on the other." 

VOLUME I NUMBER 10 of the ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH special educational section 
appears on the desk. In case there are those who have missed the first nine issues, 
it is distinguished by two things: It contains no advertising in its 8 pages and 
according to a box on page 1, is published for students in Junior and Senior High 
Schools in greater St. Louis as a public service. Also* it is free. Content is 
run-of-the-mill news, crime and violence as well as culture and foreign relations. 

BOB KERN . BELLEVILLE NEWS-DEMOCRAT: "I Swear Allegiance"... "The Board of Supervisor 
showdown on the proposed assessors-review referendum turned out far different than 
anyone expected, especially in view of the terrific pressures for defeat exerted by 
the East St. Louis machine bosses. The 21 supervisors who stood fast and voted their 
convictions in face of dire threats of political reprisal merit great commendation 
for their courage and unswerving loyalty to their constituents. 

"It's too bad that the supervisors' original decision now has been screwed up 
by parliamentary maneuvering. Patently this was expressly meant to frustrate the 
public's determination to rescue St« Clair County from the awful pickle it's in. 

"If the abolition issue does get on the ballot this year, there is no question 
what will happen at the polls. The elected county boards of assessors and review 
will be 'kaput, 1 just as Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co., recommended. And that explains 
why the entrenched interests, controlling lucrative patronage, are so set on 
preventing a referendum. 

"The vote in the Board of Supervisors Tuesday evening mirrors the widely-held 
feeling among the people that the tax bunglers must go now. They recognize that 
this amputation is basic, and that until it is performed there will be no hope 
whatever of extricating St. Clair County from the morass in which it is hopelessly 
stuck..." 

AL HODGSON . WAVERLY JOURNAL, quotes from the IAA RECORD the story of the child who 
asks, "Grandpa, were you in the Ark with Noah?" Certainly not J" was the reply. 
"Then," said the child, "why weren't you 3 drowned?" 



From Bill Lyons 12-1-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

SIU NEWS SUMMARY 
FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION 

Amid the outcry over potential dangers to man, beast and plant life from 
agricultural chemicals, two Southern Illinois University researchers have discovered 
a strange twist. Bobwhite quail actually appear to thrive on one type of weed 
killer. SIU Zoologist Wiliard Klimstra and Jay Bergstrand, a graduate student, say 
some quail fed on pellets of "Dybar," a commercial herbicide, gained more weight in 
a 10-day trial than birds who were not given the pellets. In another test, birds 
given "Dybar" pellets mixed with regular food consumed them with no apparent 
discrimination - and they also gained weight. On the basis of their study, they 
conclude that speculation about "adverse effects" on quail from sustained doses of 
the chemical are... in their words.,, not warranted. But they say it'll take a long- 
term experimentation to get a complete picture of the effects on wildlife. 

* * * * 

Bundles of Christmas trees are beginning to appear at retail shops across the 
country as the annual holiday season sales program picks up momentum. More than 
two-million Christmas trees... mostly fresh evergreens.., will be bought between now 
and Christmas to brighten Illinois homes for the holiday season. But at least 90 
per cent of them will come from other states and Canada, Ernest Kurmes, S-I-U 
assistant professor of forestry, says that for this reason families in the area 
will miss the enjoyable experience of going to a field of evergreens to select and 
cut a Christmas tree, or of buying a freshly-cut home-grown tree at the local 
market. When should you buy your tree? Kurmes says it depends on the source of 
supply and when the tree will be put up and decorated. 



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The Carbondale Rotorion 

arbondale Rotary Club Meets Every Wednesday Noon at the Elks Club 

Charter Club No. 743 - May I, 1920 

Vol. 5 No. 22 December 3, 1962 

ATTENTION AMIGO : The recent rumpus in Cuba showed how Important Latin America is to 
us. We need to know more about our neighbors to the south, to understand how they 
affect our economy and even our security. We have the opportunity to learn more 
about Latin America Wednesday when our speaker will be Dr. A. W. Bork, director of 
the Latin American Institute of SIU. This is the first of the December programs 
arranged by the program chairman for the month, H, R. Long, and it is one you will 
not want to miss. 

THERE SHOULD BE A LOT more green lawns in Carbondale after last week's informative 
talk by Dr. Joseph P. Vavra, of the Plant Industries Department of SIU. He showed 
slides to prove that the chemicals with mysterious names can retain moisture in the 
soil and keep Carbondale lawns green in the driest of summers. It is also good for 
maintaining lake levels, but no assurance that you can catch more fish. All we need 
now is a chemical to cut the grass for us. 

'TIS THE SEASON TO BE JOLLY and the latest report from Santa's helpers, Col. 
Alexander MacMillan and his fine committee is that the Rotary Christmas party at the 
University Center on December 13 will be one of the highlights of the year. The last 
count of noses shows that there will be at least 100 guests from the Murphysboro and 
Herrin clubs, plus more than 100 from our own club and a goodly group of foreign 
students. It is not too late to get your name in the pot— if you act promptly. And 
there is no better way to share the Christmas spirit than to bring a foreign student 
as your guest. At the meeting Wednesday the details will be revealed on how to pick 
up and escort your student guests. The party begins at 6:30 p.m. and the tab is a 
modest $3. There will not be a meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 12 so we can all rest up 
for a strenuous evening. Still a closely guarded secret is whether the committee will 
hang mistletoe in strategic locations. 

A REAL ROTARY WELCOME to Myrl E. Alexander, our newest member whose classification is 
Education— corrective institutions. And a tip of the hat to Clyde Winkler and his 
Membership Committee. There are four other prospective members on tap and we should 
soon pass East St. Louis in the membership race in District 651. Also a Rotary salute 
to Bryan Kimmel and his Attendance Committee. We had another fine turnout last week. 

LAST WEEK WE WELCOMED c.A. Frazer to the exclusive Grandfathers Club. In honor of 
the occasion of the arrival of his first grandson, Michael Frazer, C.A. passed around 
a box of cigars. If you sniff carefully you may detect the aroma of that fine Havana 
leaf on your copy of the Rotarian. 



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■ 



The Carbondale Rotorion 

r rbondale Rotary Club Meets Every Wednesday Noon at the Elks Club 

Charter Club No. 743 - May I, 1920 

Vol. 5 No. 22 December 3, 1962 

ATTENTION AMIGO : The recent rumpus in Cuba showed how Important Latin America is to 
us. He need to know more about our neighbors to the south, to understand how they 
affect our economy and even our security. We have the opportunity to learn more 
about Latin America Wednesday when our speaker will be Dr. A. H. Bork, director of 
che Latin American Institute of SIU, This is the first of the December programs 
arranged by the program chairman for the month, H. R. Long, and it is one you will 
not want to miss. 

THERE SHOULD BE A LOT more green lawns in Carbondale after last week's informative 
talk by Dr. Joseph P. Vavra, of the Plant Industries Department of SIU. He showed 
slides to prove that the chemicals with mysterious names can retain moisture in the 
soil and keep Carbondale lawns green in the driest of summers. It is also good for 
maintaining lake levels, but no assurance that you can catch more fish. All we need 
now is a chemical to cut the grass for us, 

'TIS THE SEASON TO BE JOLLY and the latest report from Santa's helpers, Col. 
Alexander MacMillan and his fine committee is that the Rotary Christmas party at the 
University Center on December 13 will be one of the highlights of the year. The last 
count of noses shows that there will be at least 100 guests from the Murphysboro and 
Herrin clubs, plus more than 100 from our own club and a goodly group of foreign 
students. It is not too late to get your name in the pot— if you act promptly. And 
there is no better way to share the Christmas spirit than to bring a foreign student 
as your guest. At the meeting Wednesday the details will be revealed on how to pick 
up and escort your student guests. The party begins at 6:30 p.m. and the tab is a 
modest $3. There will not be a meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 12 so we can all rest up 
for a strenuous evening. Still a closely guarded secret is whether the committee will 
hang mistletoe in strategic locations. 

A REAL ROTARY WELCOME to Myrl E. Alexander, our newest member whose classification is 
Education—corrective institutions. And a tip of the hat to Clyde Winkler and his 
Membership Committee. There are four other prospective members on tap and we should 
soon pass East St. Louis in the membership race in District 651. Also a Rotary salute 
to Bryan Kimmel and his Attendance Committee. We had another fine turnout last week. 

LAST WEEK WE WELCOMED c.A. Frazer to the exclusive Grandfathers Club. In honor of 
the occasion of the arrival of his first grandson, Michael Frazer, C.A. passed around 
a box of cigars. If you sniff carefully you may detect the aroma of that fine Havana 
leaf on your copy of the Rotarian. 

THERE WAS A STARTLED expression on a good many faces last week when our speaker 
referred to the members as a "dignified group." No doubt he was using the phrase 
loosely, but it was a flattering observation. 

jjgTARlAHS MAKE NEWS: Past President George Hand was named recently as a member of 
Advisory Committee No. 1 of the Illinois Board of Higher Education. This committee's 
Junction is to study the physical facilities of the institutions of higher learning 
in the state. Its first meeting will be held on December 12 in Springfield. Harvey 
usher goes back to Midway Island for two weeks this month to band birds as part of 
Ms work for the U. S. Government there. W, L. Eddings is one of those lucky persons 
mZ£ I * Wi ? ter vacation ' w e have been well represented at meetings of the 
Murphysboro club recently. Among those who made up at Murphysboro were Harry 
H«£ tein « " u , McK «f«y. Ralph Gallington and Tinner Eddings. Visitors at the 
Mrrin club included Frank Gumm, Harry Curtis and Phil Kimmel. Bill Budsiick 
attended a meeting of the Marion club. 

ffijttH OUOTTNO ; Tha Beaumontarian of the Rotary Club of Beaumont, Calif, suggests* 
us t^T ! nt ° f a " invlta "on, of being wanted, is a wonderful feeling. Some of 
mean? * u° l " R ° tary a long time may have for S°tten how we felt and what it 
good mP nV S " e "f re in Y ited int0 Rotary ' The fact remains; there may be many 
PPreciate R ^ r TV"? W °? W ben ? flt ° Ur club and our immunity, and who would 
«d unfilLd S" 7 ! * nvl < ation '° Moin the club.' Let's check our roster of filled 
eligible Jo Join us!"° ' 0Pen 0ne8, "* eXtend 8 " invitation to those 

3jU£jUgA£lNg i nt0 the se ason when traffic accidents increase. A timely article in 

-Ssk! 1t r is°iL r a on by fit 1 ™ ^^r" " 8iVe " SOme valuable hln " ° n *» "o «rive 
——---^ it is lust one of the many fine features in the current issue vou will want 

Service Cfoove Self - Jie (Profits Jiosl QYL Serves 3est 



CARBONDALE ROTARY CLUB — 1962-63 



VICE-PRESIDENT 

Max Sappenfield 



GOVERNOR DIST. 651 PRESIDENT 

Norman Beck Tom Easterly 

DIRECTORS: Frank Gumm, Ken Miller, Max Sappenfield, Bob Vokac 
PAST DISTRICT GOVERNOR: Lester Webb PAST PRESIDENT: Harry Goldstein 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 
Jim Mowry 



COMMITTEES 






CLUB SERVICE 

Max Sappenfield, Director 
ATTENDANCE 

Bryan Kimmel, Chairman 
CLASSIFICATION 

Carl Birkholz, Chairman 
CLUB BULLETIN 

Bill Lyons, Chairman . 

FELLOWSHIP - 
SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 

John Q, Clark, Chairman 
MAGAZINE - 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Roye Bryant, Chairman 
MEMBERSHIP 

Clyde Winkler, Chairman 
PROGRAM ! 

Max Sappenfield, Chairman 
AUDITING 

W. B. Crane, Jr., Chairman 
MUSIC 

George Hand, Chairman 
LEGISLATION 

Herb Settle, Chairman 
HISTORY 

John Allen, Chairman 






VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

Frank Gumm, Director 
BUYER-SELLER- 
COMPETITOR-RELATIONS 

Henry J. Rehn, Chairman 
EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE 
RELATIONS 

Curt Mann, Chairman 
FOUR WAY TEST & 
COMMUNITY 
GOVERNMENT 

Mason Parker, Chairman 
OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Neil Hosley, Chairman 



.. j 












COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Kenneth Miller, Director 
YOUTH 

Paul Hoffman, Chairman 
COMMUNITY SAFETY 

James Wallace, Chairman 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Don Crocker, Chairman 
SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS & 
STUDENT LOANS 
• Frank Klingberg, Chairman 
STUDENT GUESTS 

Chuck Southard, Chairman 
INTER-SERVICE 
CLUB MEETINGS 

A. R. MacMillan, Chairman 



• 



INTERNATIONAL SERVICE 

Robert Vokac, Director 
INTERNATIONAL 
CONTACTS 

Howard Long, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Paul Campisi, Chairman 
ROTARY FOUNDATION 

Wilis Swartz, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
STUDENT PROJECTS 

Ralph Bushee, Chairman 



: 






! 






ROSTER 



■ 



Name Nickname 

Abbott, Talbert W. (Abbott) 
Adams, George W. (George) 
Armstrong, John M. (John) 
Birkholz, Carl K. (Carl) 
Bryant, Roye R. (Roye) 
Budslick, William (Bill) 
Bushee, Ralph W. (Ralph) 
Campisi, Paul J. (Paul) 
Clark, John Q. (John) 
Clayton, Charles C. (Charley) ' 
Crane, William B., Jr. (Bill) , 
Crocker, D. R. (Don) 
Curtis, Harry C. (Harry) 
Easterly, Thomas A. (Tom) 
Eddings, W. L. (Tinner) 
Feirich, Charles E. (Charley) 
Fisher, Harvey I. (Harvey) 
Frazer, C. A. (C.A.) 
Gallington, Ralph O. (Ralph) 
Goldstein, Harry S. (Golde) 
Gray, Ralph (Ralph) 
Gumm, Frank L. (Frank) 
Hamblen, John W. (John) 
Hand, George H. (George) 
Hoffman, Paul M. (Paul) 
Hosley, Neil W. (Neil) 
Joseph, R. C. (Joe) 
Keith, Malcolm Robert (Bob) 
Kimmel, Bryan (Bryan) 
Kimmel, Philip (Phip) 
Klingberg, Frank L. (Frank) 
Koonce, Harry (Harry) 
Lee, W. D. (Doug) 
Long, Howard R. (H.R.) 
Lyons, William H. (Bill) 
MacMillan, Alexander R. (Mac) 






Membership or Classification 

Senior Active 
Edu. — History 
Gas & Oil Wholesaling 
Art Goods — Retailing 
Senior Active 
Motor Courts 
Edu. — Library 
Edu. — Sociology 
Edu. — High School Principal 
Edu. — Jotirnal Publishing 
Accounting Service 
Christianity — Prostestantism 
Senior Active 

Decorating materials — Retailing 
Heating Service 
Senior Active 
Edu. — Zoology 
Edu. > — Info. Serv. 
Edu. — Industrial Education 
Men's Furnishings — Retailing 
Real Estate Agency 
Associations — YMCA Director 
Edu. — Computing Service 
Senior Active 
Edu. — Marketing 
Edu. — Forestry 
R.R. Transp. — Dispatching 
Plastics — Mfg. 
Petroleum — Production 
Taxi Service 
. Edu. — Government 
.R.R. Transp. — Div. Supt. 
Television — Service 
Edu. — Journalism 
Edu. — Info. Serv. 
Edu. — Transportation 






Name Nickname 

Mann, Curt F. (Curt) 
Mars, John T. (John) 
McKeefery, William J. (Bill) 
McRoy, Paul F, (Paul) 
Miller, Kenneth R. (Ken) 
Mowry, James B. (Jim) 
Murray, Glen H. (Glen) 
Murrie, B. J. (B.J.) 
Nagel, Williarq E. (Bill) 
Neunlist, Dempsey V. (D.V.) 
Parker, H. M. (Mason) 
Parrish, Carl A. (Cap) 
Parrish, Gordon A. (Gordon) 
Pulley, Charles (Charles) 
Rehn, Henry J. (Henry) 
Renfro, Louis F. (L.F.) 
Sappenfield, Max M. (Max) 
Sederlin, Elvin L. (E.L.) 
Semar, Preston 
Settle, Herbert B. (Herb) 
Southard, Charles (Chuck) 
Stafford, Eugene (Gene) 
Swartz, Willis G. (Bill) 
Swick, Ralph D. (Ralph) 
Veath, Irose J. (I. J.) 
Vokac, Robert B. (Bob) 
Wiegand, G. Carl (Carl). 
Winkler, Clyde V. (Clyde) 
Allen, John W. (John) 
Davis, Robert W., (Bob) 
Dill, John D. (John) • 
Hodge, John R. (John) . 
Jordon, Roy V. (Roy) 
Lentz, E. G. (Gib) 
Smith, Clyde L. (Clyde) 



Membership or Classification 

Men's Clothing — Retailing 
Banking — Savings 
Edu. — Admin. Acad. Affaii 
Broadcasting Services 
Edu. — University Admin. 
Horticulture — Research 
House Furniture — Retailing 
Building Construction 
Edu. — Tech. Adult Edu. 
Comercial Photography 
Elec. Light & Power Service 
Insurance — Life 
Milk — Distributing 
Edu. — Architectural Service 
Edu. — School of Business 
Senior Active 
Edu. — Government 
Public Health 
Loans — Auto Financing 
Highway Eng. Utilities 
Edu. — Student Counseling 
Ins. — Health and Hospital 
Senior Active 
Edu. — Accounting 
Sporting Goods — Retailing 
Edu. — Placements 
Edu. — Economics 
Past Service- 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 



. -.0 

From Bill Lyons ] 12-3-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



ST, LOUIS, Dec, — The annual winter meeting of the St. Louis Area Alumni 
Club of Southern Illinois University will be held at Lisitano*s Restaurant here 
Friday (Dec. 7) at 7 p.m. 

Dr. Martin L. Dosick, assist professor of sociology at SIU's Edwardsville 
campus, will be the dinner speaker. 

Dosick has participated in delinquency studies undertaken by SIU and plans 
to tell the group of the latest trends in the field and plans for the local 
area delinquency studies. 



-Ik- 



CARBONDALE ROTARY CLUB — 1962-63 



GOVERNOR D1ST 651 PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Norman Beck Tom Easterly Max Sappenfield Jim Mowry 

DIRECTORS: Frank Gumm, Ken Miller, Max Sappenfield, Bob Vokac 

PAST DISTRICT GOVERNOR: Lester Webb PAST PRESIDENT: Harry Goldstein 

COMMITTEES 



CLUB SERVICE 

Max Sappenfield, Director 
ATTENDANCE 

Bryan Kimmel, Chairman 
CLASSIFICATION 

Carl Birkholz, Chairman 
CLUB BULLETIN 

Bill Lyons, Chairman 
FELLOWSHIP - 
SERG EANT-AT- AR MS 

John Q, Clark, Chairman 
MAGAZINE - 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Roye Bryant, Chairman 
MEMBERSHIP 

Clyde Winkler, Chairman 
PROGRAM ! 

Max Sappenfield, Chairman 
AUDITING 

W. B. Crane, Jr., Chairman 
MUSIC 

George Hand, Chairman 
LEGISLATION 

Herb Settle, Chairman 
HISTORY 

John Allen, Chairman 



VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

Frank Gumm, Director 
BUYER-SELLER- 
COMPETITOR-RELATIONS 

Henry J. Rehn, Chairman 
EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE 
RELATIONS 

Curt Mann, Chairman 
FOUR WAY TEST & 
COMMUNITY 
GOVERNMENT 

Mason Parker, Chairman 
OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Neil Hosley, Chairman 



COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Kenneth Miller, Director 
YOUTH 

Paul Hoffman, Chairman 
COMMUNITY SAFETY 

James Wallace, Chairman 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Don Crocker, Chairman 



INTERNATIONAL SERVICE 

Robert Vokac, Director 
INTERNATIONAL 
CONTACTS 

Howard Long, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Paul Campisi, Chairman 



SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS & R °TARY FOUNDATION 



Wilis Swartz, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
STUDENT PROJECTS 

Ralph Bushee, Chairman 



STUDENT LOANS 

Frank Klingberg, Chairman 
STUDENT GUESTS 

Chuck Southard, Chairman 
INTER-SERVICE 
CLUB MEETINGS 

A. R. MacMillan, Chairman 
; 

- ■ 



ROSTER 



Name Nickname 

Abbott, Talbert W. (Abbott) 
Adams, George W. (George) 
Armstrong, John M. (John) 
Birkholz, Carl K. (Carl) 
Bryant, Roye R. (Roye) 
Budslick, William (Bill) 
Bushee, Ralph W. (Ralph) 
Campisi, Paul J. (Paul) 
Clark, John Q. (John) 
Clayton, Charles C. (Charley) ' 
Crane, William B., Jr. (Bill) . 
Crocker, D. R. (Don) 
Curtis, Harry C. (Harry) 
Easterly, Thomas A. (Tom) 
Eddings, W. L. (Tinner) 
Feirich, Charles E. (Charley) 
Fisher, Harvey I. (Harvey) 
Frazer, C. A. (C.A.) 
Gallington, Ralph O. (Ralph) 
Goldstein, Harry S. (Golde) 
Gray, Ralph (Ralph) 
Gumm, Frank L. (Frank) 
Hambleri, John W. (John) 
Hand, George H. (George) 
Hoffman, Paul M. (Paul) 
Hosley, Neil W. (Neil) 
Joseph, R. C. (Joe) 
Keith, Malcolm Robert (Bob) 
Kimmel, Bryan (Bryan) 
Kimmel, Philip (Phip) 
Klingberg, Frank L. (Frank) 
Koonce, Harry (Harry) 
Lee, W. D. (Doug) 
Long, Howard R. (H.R.) 
Lyons, William H. (Bill) 
MacMillan, Alexander R. (Mac) 



Membership or Classification 

Senior Active 
Edu. — History 
Gas & Oil Wholesaling 
Art Goods — • Retailing 
Senior Active 
Motor Courts 

Edu. — Library • 

Edu. — Sociology 
Edu. — High School Principal 
Edu. — Journal Publishing 
Accounting Service 
Christianity — Prostestantism 
Senior Active 

Decorating materials — Retailing 
Heating Service 
Senior Active 
Edu, — Zoology 
Edu. i — Info. Serv. 
Edu. — Industrial Education , 
Men's Furnishings — Retailing 
Real Estate Agency 
Associations — YMCA Director 
Edu. — Computing Service 
Senior Active 
Edu. — Marketing 
Edu. — Forestry 
R.R. Transp. — Dispatching - 
Plastics — Mfg. 
Petroleum — Production ' . 
Taxi Service 
. Edu. — Government 
.R.R. Transp. — Div. Supt, , 
Television — Service 
Edu. — Journalism 
Edu. — Info. Serv. 
Edu. — Transportation 



Name Nickname 

Mann, Curt F. (Curt) 
Mars, John T. (John) 
McKeefery, William J. (Bill) 
McRoy, Paul F, (Paul) 
Miller, Kenneth R. (Ken) 
Mowry, James B. (Jim) 
Murray, Glen H. (Glen) 
Murrie, B. J. (B.J.) 
Nagel, Willian\ E. (Bill) 
Neunlist, Dempsey V. (D.V.) 
Parker, H. M. (Mason) * 
Parrish, Carl A. (Cap) 
Parrish, Gordon A. (Gordon) 
Pulley, Charles (Charles) 
Rehn, Henry J. (Henry) 
Renfro, Louis F. (L,F.) 
Sappenfield, Max M. (Max) 
Sederlin, Elvin L. (E.L.) 
Semar, Preston 
Settle, Herbert B. (Herb) 
Southard, Charles (Chuck) 
Stafford. Eugene (Gene) 
Swartz, Willis G. (Bill) 
Swick, Ralph D. (Ralph) ■■ 
Veath, Irose J. (I. J.) 
Vokac, Robert B. (Bob) 
Wtegand, G. Carl (Carl), 
Winkler, Clyde V. (Clyde) 
Allen, John W. (John) 
Davis, Robert W., (Bon) 
Dill, John-D. (John) ■ 
Hodge, John R. (John) ■ 
Jordon, Roy V. (Roy) ./ 
Lentz, E. G. (Gib) 
Smith, Clyde L. (Clyde) 



: 
Membership or Classification 

Men's Clothing — Retailing 
Banking — Savings 
Edu. — Adihin. Acad. Affair: 
, Broadcasting Services 
Edu. — University Admin. 
Horticulture — Research 
House Furniture — Retailing 
Building Construction 
Edu. — Tech. Adult Edu. 
Comercial Photography 
Elec. Light & Power Service 
Insurance — Life 
Milk — Distributing 
Edu. — Architectural Service 
Edu. — School of Business 
Senior Active 
Edu. — Government 
Public Health 
Loans ■ — Auto Financing 
Highway Eng. Utilities 
Edu. — Student Counseling 
Ins. — Health and Hospital 
Senior Active 
Edu. — Accounting 
Sporting Goods — Retailing 
Edu. — Placements 
Edu. — Economics 
Past Service- 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 
Honorary 



AREA ROTARY MEETINGS— 



■ 

Monday Noon — Centralia, Harrisburg, Herrin, New Athens, O'Fallon 

Monday Evening — Cairo, Chester, Cisne, Columbia, Freeburg, Golconda, Mt. Carmel, Olney, Pinckneyville, 

Tuesday Noon — Albion, Belleville, Chicago, Eldorado, Mt. Vernon, Urbana, West Frankfort 

Tuesday Evening — Benton, Carmi, DuQuoin, Flora, Murphysboro, Sparta, Waterloo, Wayne City 

Wednesday Noon — Carbondale, East St. Louis, Johnston City, Lebanon ' V 

Thursday Noon — Anna, Carlyle, Fairfield, Lawrenceville, Marion, Metropolis, St. Louis 

Thursday Evening — Marissa, Mascoutah, Nashville, Zeigler 

Friday Noon _ Louisville, Salem ... , . 

Fnday Evening — Crossville, Millstadt , . ... 



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From Bill Lyons H 12-3-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



ST. LOUIS, Dec, — The annual winter meeting of the St. Louis Area Alumni 
Club of Southern Illinois University will be held at Lisitano's Restaurant here 
Friday (Dec. 7) at 7 p.m. 

Dr. Martin L. Dosick, assist professor of sociology at SIU's Edwardsville 
campus, will be the dinner speaker. 

Dosick has participated in delinquency studies undertaken by SIU and plans 
to tell the group of the latest trends in the field and plans for the local 
area delinquency studies. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




12-3-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Dec. — The University High School chorus, madrigal 
singers and junior high chorus will present "carols at Christmas," a yearly 
program of music and scriptural readings, Sunday (Dec. 9) at Shryock Auditorium. 
The public program will be at 4 p.m. 

Directed by Charles Taylor, head of vocal music instruction at University 
School, the choral units will sing a variety of carols from different periods and 
countries. Frozella Croslin will be narrator. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




12-3-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBCNDALE, ILL., Dec, — The annual dinner dance of the Southern Illinois 
University Women's Club and the Newcomers Club will he held Friday, (Dec. 7) in 
the University Center from 6:30 p.m. until midnight, co-chairmen Mrs. Rex Karnes 
and Mrs. David Chris tensen announced today. 

Dancing will follow the dinner from 8:30 p.m. until midnight with Glen Daum's 
orchestra providing music. Musical entertainment will be provided during band 
breaks . 

Assisting Mrs. Karnes and Mrs. Christensen with plans for the events are 
Mrs. Walter Schmid, Mrs. James Backes and Mrs. Howard Olson, decorations committee; 
Mrs. Robert Odaniell, Mrs. Jack Graham and Mrs. H.D. Piper, program committee; 
Mrs. Robert Gallegly, Mrs. William Stewart and Mrs. Schmid, reservations committee 
and Mrs. I. Shechmeister and Mrs. Burton Levy, publicity. Mrs. Levy was at 
Oxford, England last year; Mrs, Stewart at Frostburg, Md.; Mrs. Piper at California 
Tech, Pasadena and Mrs. Schmid at the University of California. 

WomensClub officers include Mrs. Charles Tenney, president; Mrs. Delyte W.Morris, 
honorary president; Mrs. David Kenney, vice president; Mrs. William Wright, 
corresponding secretary; Mrs. Grosvenor Rust, recording secretary and Mrs. Ralph Swick 
treasurer. 

Newcomer officers include Mrs, John Hamblen, president; Mrs. William McXeefery, 
vice president; Mrs. Leslie Gates, program chairman; Mrs. C.W. Southard, treasurer 
and Mrs, Carl Langenhop, secretary. 



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From Bill Lyons y ' 12-3-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — E. Frederick List, community consultant for 
Southern Illinois University's community development service, has announced his 
resignation to accept a position as assistant professor in the Center for Community 
Development at the University of Missouri. 

A native of Weehawken, New Jersey, List was reared in Alton, and received a 
bachelor's degree from Shurtleff College there. He was awarded a master's degree 
in education from Washington University in St. Louis in 1948. 

He was an industrial editor and public relations representative for Shell Oil, 
served as public relations director of Shurtleff College, spent more than three 
years duty with the U.S. Army Air Forces Weather Service, and came to Southern 
in 1957 as a community consultant. 

In his position at SIU, List has worked on community development programs 
in Goreville, Enfield, Centralia, Christopher, and with the Saline Valley 
Development Association. He has also served as editor of the bi-monthly "Community 
Development Newsletter." 

He is a member of Phi Delta Kappa, national education fraternity, and the 
Adult Education Association, is married, and has three children. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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12 - 4 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CAP30NDALE, ILL., Dec. — The St. Clair County Southern Illinois University 
Alumni Club will meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday (Dec, 11) at The Dutch Girl restaurant 
in Belleville, it was announced today. 

Speaker at the dinner meeting will be Harry H. Smith, chairman of the SIU 
President's Committee on General Studies. 

Smith will discuss and answer questions on Southern's new General Studies 
program. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




12-4-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec, — A Southern Illinois University engineering 
researcher, George Glenn, will describe his studies of soil mineral reactions 
at the annual meeting of the Highway Research Board in Washington, D.d Jan, 7. 

Glenn, assistant professor of applied science, began research for the 
presentation in 1961 while studying civil engineering specialties under Ford 
Foundation sponsorship at Iowa State University, His work— covering the chemical 
reactions occurring when lime and water are added to road and airfield foundation 
soils— is currently supported by SIU's Office of Research and Projects, 

Glenn, a member of the SIU faculty since 1953, is a native of Anderson, 
Indiana, 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



c i Ml 

6 4M 



12-4-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Looking for a clear title after earning a share 
of top honors in the University of Pittsburgh Invitational Saturday (Dec. 1), 
Southern Illinois University's premiere debate team will carry the school colors 
into the big Uake Forest Invitational Tournament this weekend (Dec. 7-8). 

Phil Uander of Bloomington and Richard Fulkerson of Carbondale teamed with 
Charles Zoeckler and Pat Micken of Carbondale to tie the University of Alabama's 
four-man delegation for the Pitt meet championship. Fulkerson and Wander took 
the first place negative team trophy and Fulkerson tied for first place as the 
best individual speaker. 

Wander and Fulkerson now have won 15 decisions against four losses in three 
tournaments this season and are rated as chief contenders for the Wake Forest 
trophy. Their competition at Pittsburgh included 40 schools, including debate 
powers Ohio State, Vermont, George Washington, South Carolina and Michigan, In 
a series of city-wide exhibitions at high schools before the tournament, the SIU 
duo decisioned the host Pittsburgh team, 4-3. 

In other tournaments last Saturday, SIU debaters fared less well. 
Barbara Ellmore, Easton, and Glenn Huisinga, Calumet City, finished out of the 
runoffs at the Air Force Academy Invitational and freshman delegations split in 
competition at Greenville (111.) College and Butler (Ind.) University. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 






12 - 4-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec, — Theta Xi social fraternity has named committees 
for the 16th annual variety show at Southern Illinois University March 1-2. 

Kent 0. Sprague of (422 W. North) Girard and Larry A. Baldwin of (631 N. 
Webster) Harrisburg will serve as co-chairmen. Last year more than 70 acts 
tried out for the show with 14 selected for performance in Shryock Auditorium. 
Groups from the Edwardsville campus are also eligible for the show. 

Committe members for this year's Variety Show include: 

CAIRO: David L, Jewell, 2711 Park, usher committee. 

COBDEN: Darrell L. Dillon, R.R.2, concession committee, 

DECATUR: Joseph B. Taylor, 1937 Summit, act co-ordinator; Ronald A. Ellis, 

3G45 Constant View, pledge acts; Thomas E. Bissey, 1966 S. Decatur, 
pledge acts. 

KANKAKEE: Vance L. Uadleigh, 402 Hammes, tickets. 

LAWREHCEVILLE : Ronald P. Patton, R.R.3, coorespendence. 

MINNEAPOLIS , MINN.: John S. Reese, 6013 Goodrich, stage crew. 

0AKN00D: Jimmy J. Rogers, finance. 

PEORIA: Steven R. Vonachen, C926 Picture Ridge, Service to Southern Award. 

PALOS PARK: James L. Berg, 12210 S. 86th, public relations. 

P0NTIAC: Carl E. Adkins, 1118 S. Mill, publicity. 

SULLIVAN: Roger L. Landers, R.R.2, trophies; Gary B. Kessinger, 82C Sunset, 
usher committee, 

WESTCHESTER: Jack R. DuHasek, 2350 Buckingham, stage crew. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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12-4-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — The first in a series of 20 Metropolitan Opera 
broadcasts was heard over Southern Illinois University's WSIU radio Saturday 
(Dec. 1) at 9 p.m. 

It's the second year WSIU has carried the Metropolitan Opera series and 
Clifton T. Holman, Jr., director of Radio operations, said all other broadcasts 
in the series will be at 1 p.m. each Saturday. 

Other operas and the dates on which they will be heard are: Cavalier ia 
Rusticana & Pagliacci, Dec. C; Aida, Dec, 15; Der Rosenkavalier, Dec. 22; Pelleas 
et Melisande, Dec, 29; Die Meistersinger von Nuernberg, Jan. 5; Un Ballo in 
Maschera, Jan. 12; Don Giovanni, Jan, 19; Fidelio, Jan. 26; Der Fliegende Hollaender, 
Feb, 2; Adriana Lecouvreur, Feb, 9; Ariadne auf Naxos, Feb, 16; Tristan und Isolde, 
Feb, 23; Andrea Chenier, March 2; II Barbiere di Civiglia, March 9; La Traviata, 
March 16; Othello, March 23; La Sonnambula, March 30; Boris Godunov, April 6; 
and Fledermaus, April 13, 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



12-4-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — James W. Porter, research archaeologist for the 
Southern Illinois University Museum, was elected vice president and president- 
elect of the Illinois Archaeological Survey at the organization's meeting last 
Saturday (Dec. 1) at Urbana. 

Porter will become head of the survey for 1964. Composed of professional 
archaeologists of the state, together with a few interested persons of neighboring 
states, the survey helps to coordinate certain types of archaeological 
investigations in Illinois and also issues a professional periodical, now in its 
fourth year. 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




12-4-62 
Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Bill Meade, Southern Illinois University's 
successful gymnastics coach, has been selected as one of two coaches who will 
direct the East's all-star team in competition against the West in the Western 
Gymnastics Clinic at the University of Arizona. 

The meet, a week-long affair, will include championship competition Dec. 26 
with individual winners receiving berths on the East and West all-star teams. 
They will collide Dec. 28 in the clinic's feature atrraction. 

In addition to Meade, the East squad will be coached by Dick Holzaepfel of 
the University of Iowa while Gordon Maddox, Los Angeles State College, and 
Dick Smith, University of Oregon, will coach the West. 

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CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Defensive halfback Dennis Harmon, Watseka, and 
Jim Battle, an end from Chicago, were selected as most valuable players of 
Southern Illinois University's football team by their teammates. 

Both Harmon and Battle were vital cogs in Southern's defensive unit which 
performed well throughout the 1962 campaign despite the fact the Salukis finished 
with an unimpressive 4-6 mark. 

Battle T*as also one of three SIU players who were picked on Hillsdale's 
all-opponent team. Others were tackle Sam Silas, Bartow, Fla., and center 
Steve Cox, Indianapolis, Ind. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




^ 



12-4-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBOtlDALE, ILL., Dec. — A textbook for college English students written 
by Robert Partlow, assistant professor of English at Southern Illinois University, 
will be published this month by Prentice-Hall, Inc. of New York. 

"A Liberal Arts Reader" has been compiled by Partlow over the past two 
years and is intended for use in freshman composition courses. Some 550 pages 
in length, it includes examples of writing in the field of liberal arts and 
sciences, ranging from Time magazine to Sir Thomas Browne. 

Partlow came to SIU in 1957 from the University of New Hampshire. A native 
of Boston, he received degrees from Harvard University. 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist yjtA 12-4-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. ~ After dominating top honors in the Illinois 
Invitational meet last week, Southern Illinois University's wrestlers open their 
home season Saturday afternoon (2 p.m.) by entertaining Findlay College. 

The Salukis topped Findlay 32-3 last season in the first meeting between 
the two schools and are not anticipating too much difficulty this year as Coach 
Jim Wilkinson's squad appears to be in mid-season form. 

Southern won five individual titles in state-wide competition last week as 
Frank Coniglio and Terry Finn of Oak Lawn, Don Millard, Pekin, Irv Johnston, 
Elgin and Larry Kristoff, Carbondale claimed blue ribbons. 

Coniglio, Finn and Millard all won matches against Findlay opponents last 
season when the Ohioans gained only one victory. 



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CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Several pool records may be in jeopardy Saturday 
when Southern Illinois University's swimmers host an open meet which is expected 
to attract top-flight competition. 

The Salukis, who outclassed Oklahoma 59-36 in their season's opener, will have 
their full squad entered as well as several members of the SIU freshmen group. 

Heading Southern's representatives will be team captain Jack Schiltz, who won 
both breaststroke events in last year's meet; sprint specialist Ray Padovan; and 
sophomore stars Ted Petras and Darrell Green. 

Coach Ralph Casey is expecting a similar field as a year ago when Kansas, 
Kansas State, Missouri Athletic Club, and Florissant Swim Club sent teams. 

Preliminaries are scheduled for 2 p.m. with finals set for & p.m. 

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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist 12-4-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Well-rested after its 73-66 upset of St. Bonaventure, 
Southern Illinois University opens its home season Saturday night when the Salukis 
are slated to entertain Central Missouri. 

Coach Jack Hartman's cagers will be seeking their second win of the season 
against a team which last weekend dropped a 6G-53 decision to Tulsa after opening 
with a 63-49 win over Ottawa, Kans. 

Southern's defense, which clicked almost to perfection despite a 54-49 loss 
to Gannon prior to its win over the Bonnies, will receive another stiff test 
against Central Missouri's Bud Vallino and Gordon McFarland. The two ex-Illinois 
prep stars troubled the Salukis last year when Southern was extended to win 76-75 
and C7-76 encounters. 

Hartman, however, has this year's SIU squad concentrating on defense and even 
St. Bonaventure' s highly-regarded Ail-American candidates Fred Crawford and 
Mike Rooney had difficulty in getting open shots against Ed Spila and Eldon Bigham. 

Offensively the Salukis were sparked by Dave Henson, team co-captain along 
with Spila, and newcomer Paul Henry. Henson followed up a nine-point performance 
against Gannon with a superb 24-point effort the following night while Henry 
averaged 13 points per contest and led his teammates with 12 rebounds against the 
Bonnies . 

Following Saturday night's contest the Salukis will depart Sunday afternoon 
for Norman, Okla. , where they'll challenge the University of Oklahoma's Sooners 
Monday night. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



12-4-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



SIU NEWS SUMMARY 
FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION 

A wealth of source material for future historians and folklorists on "Egypt" 

has been given to the Morris Library of Southern Illinois University... by the man 

who has been a walking encyclopedia on southern Illinois for more than half a 

century. John W. Allen, World War One doughboy, former school teacher, historian, 

folklorist and newspaper feature writer, has effected a "trade" with the library. 

The library gets the bulk of his personal collections and files of original 

material. Allen gets working space and other facilities in the library to continue 

his research and writing. Included in the gift: 5-hundred volumes, dozens of 

manuscripts, illustrated maps, thousands of pages of typed notes, letters, 

photographs, negatives and slides. 

* * * * 

More than 3-hundred undergraduate students are attending S-I-U this year as 
winners of Illinois State Scholarships. This includes 165 freshmen with awards, 
the largest number enrolled at Southern since the Illinois State Scholarship 
Commission x*as established by the legislature in 1957* These scholarships are 
awarded on the basis of statewide competitive e2caminations conducted for high 
school seniors and winners can go to any school in Illinois. The scholarships are 
renewable each year the student is in college on recommendation of registrars. 

* * * * 

The University High School chorus, madrigal singers and junior high chorus 
will present "Carols at Christmas" at Shryock Auditorium at Southern Sunday (Dec. 9) 
at 4 p.m. 






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Two S-I-U alumni groups are planning meetings. The St. Clair County S-I-U 
Alumni Club will meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday (Dec. 11) at the Dutch Girl restaurant 
in Belleville, Speaker will be Harry H. Smith, chairman of the S-I-U presidents 
committee on general studies. The St. Louis area alumni club will hold its annual 
winter meeting at Lisitano's restaurant in St. Louis Friday (Dec. 7). Speaker 
for this meeting will be Dr. Martin L. Dosick, assistant professor of sociology 
at S-I-U' s Edwardsville campus. 

* * * * 

The annual dinner dance of the S-I-U Women's Club and the Newcomers Club will 
be held Friday (Dec. 7) in the University Center from 6:30 p.m. until midnight. 
The event was inaugurated last year by the Newcomers Club, composed of wives of 
faculty members who have been at S-I-U two years or less. 

* * * * 

S-I-U engineering researcher George Glenn will describe his studies of soil 
mineral reactions at the annual meeting of the Highway Research Board in Washington, 
D.C., January 7th. Glenn* s work covers the chemical reactions occurring when lime 
and water are added to road and airfield foundation soils. 

* * * * 

Kent 0. Sprague of Girard and Larry A. Baldwin of Harrisburg have been named 
co-chairmen for the Theta Xi social fraternity's 16th annual variety show at S-I-U 
March first and second. Last year, more than 70 acts tried out for the show, with 
14 selected for actual performance. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHER!! ILLIHOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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12-4-52 



Pxlease: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — More than 300 undergraduate students are attending 
Southern Illinois University this year at the Carbondale campus as winners of 
Illinois State Scholarships. Of the total, 165 are 1962 winners, the largest 
group of freshmen enrolled with awards at SIU since the Illinois State Scholarship 
Commission was established by the legislature in 1957. 

The scholarships are awarded on the basis of statewide competitive examinations 
conducted for high school seniors and winners can go to any school in Illinois. 
The scholarships are renewable each year the student is in college on recommendation 
of registrars. Monetary scholarships pay tuition and fees. Winners without 
financial need are granted honorary scholarships. 

Students attending with scholarships this year are: 

ALBION: Margaret Hambly, 25 E. Walnut; BBEESE: Paula Von Gerichten, 439 N. 6th 
Karen Wash, 229 N. Sixth; Lois Williams, BRIDGEPORT: William McCausland, RR.l; 
RFD 3 Carol Abel, 544 Lanterman 

ALEDO: Rather ine Foster 

ALTAMONT: Joan Devantier CAIRO: James Buie, 209 10th; Carole Faith, 

ALTON: Stephen Flenner, 3066 Coronado Dr.;520 34th; Patricia Pitcher, 412 35th 
Kathleen Glynn, 1605 Henry; Donald CALUMET CITY: Glenn Huisinga, 1265 River 
Mackenroth, 2325 State; Edith Young, 1417 Dr.; Diane Huisinga, 1265 River Dr.; Janet 
State; Roberta Watkins, 330G Fernwood Nelsen, 1495 Lincoln PI. 



ANCHOR: Michael Taylor 

ANNA: Emily Schroeder, 202 N. Main; 

Margarett Bartels, 103 Apple Ln. 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS: Trilla Reeves, G16 

N. Kaspar 

AURORA: Thomas Todd, 3C3 Ashland Ave. 

AVA: Lynn Springs, Joyce Johnson 

BEARDSTOWN: Linda Lemmon, 110 E. 11th 
BEECHER: Robert Demik 
BEECHER CITY: Leo Delhaute 
BELLEVILLE: Robert Grimmer, 912 Forest 



CARBONDALE: Howard Benson Jr.; Rena Price, 
Richard Fulkerson, Caryl IClingberg; Char lee 
Brown, Gary Campbell, Judith Harbison, 
Loumona Petroff , Edward Waldron 
CARLYLE: Paulette Nothaus, 1711 Fairfax 
CARMI: Donald Clark, RR.l; Michael Hines, 
110 E. Ratcliff 

CARRIER MILLS: Beverly Beavers, 412 N. Malt 
CASEY: Carolyn Tyler, 314 E. Adams 
CENTRALIA: James Younker, R.R. 4 
CHAMPAIGN: Larry Askew, R.R. 2 
CHESTER: Stephen Heuer, 402 Roverview; 



Hill; Patricia Phillips, 004 N. Charles; James Downen, 24 Lincoln; Kenneth Neville, 



Richard Parrish, 304 Kansas; Barbara 

Beebe, 7301 Northern 

BELLMONT: Darrell Gehret 

BENLD: Don Saracco, 311 S. Hardroad 

BERWYN: Mary Sis tier, 36^3 S. Grove; 

Cheryl Chmelik, 1632 East Ave.; William 

Dedic, 4200 Wisconsin 

BL00MIEGT0N: Philip Wander, 705 E. 

Washington 

B0NFIELD: David Kelly 

BONNIE: Larry Sledge 



Rt. 2; Neal Bartels 1427 Oak 
CHICAGO: Gerald Knoll, 6015 N. Oleander; 
John Huck, 12535 S. Lincoln; Barbara 
Carlson, 1722 N. Keating; Toni Miles, 5045 
Nashville; Jack Strandhoy, 6942 N. Wolcott; 
Jane Sturt, 422 E. Gist; Billie Trotter 
6456 Minerva; Ronald Cundiff, 4535 Magnolit 
J. Sanders, 3904 W. 66th 
CHILLICOTHE: George Hiduk, R.R. 1 
CLIFTON: Dale Schultz 
C0LLINSVTLLE: Marian Dean, R.R. 1 



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C0LUM3IA: Shirley McConkey, SFD 1 
CRETE: Caryl Dykstra, 1441 Selleck 
CROSSVILLE: William Wake 

DANVILLE: Virginia Eickhoff, 147 Wisconsin; 
Elizabeth Adkins, 11 S. State 
DECATUR: Marilyn Blaylock, 897 W. Leaf land; 
Michael Murphy, Hazel Ave,; Janet Ross, 
644 W. Olive 

DES PLAINES: Georgann Percival, 708 Thacker 
DUPO: Ronald Koblitz, 104 N. Fourth 
DUQUOIN: Joan Hinkley, 328 E. Park; 
Richard Daily, 401 N. Winters; Monte Green, 
R.R.2; Roger Striker, R.R.I; Linda Whipkey, 
317 N. Vine; Barbara Theobald, 321 N. 
Washington 

EAST ALTON: Richard Hopper, 1067 El Paso 

Ln, ; Charlotte Knox, 424 Whitelaw; 

Kenneth Pearson, 91 Bert; Elaine Titus, 

66 Bert; Donna Zielinski, 4 Wilshire 

EAST PEORIA: Robert Skouby, 219 William 

EAST ST. LOUIS: Judith Culpepper, 711 N. 

26th; Mary Harris, 1733 N. 47th 

EDWARDS VILLE: Benjamin Calvert, RR 1; 

Ronnie Martini, 1014 Longfellow; Robert 

Kriege, 1201 Troy Rd.; John Helm, 1583 

Poag Rd. 

ELKVILLE: Earl Rees 

ELLERY: Bonnie Winter 

ELLIS GROVE: Royce Ragland 

ELMHURST: Edwin Delmastro, 270 Eggleston; 

Jean Kendall, 430 E. Valette 

ELDORADO: Jon Boczkiewicz, 1511 Hardy 

FAIRFIELD: Tom Akeman, 406 N.W. 5th; Byron 

Pappas, 413 E. Sibley; Leslie Pappas, 413 

E. Sibley; David Smith, 300 N. Delaware; 

Doris Files, 613 W. Main 

FAIRMOUNT: Harold Jenkins 

FARMER CITY: Paul Zimmerman Jr. 

FLORA: Pamela Rose, 431 N. Olive 

FORREST: Ronald Rieger 

FREEBURG: P.C. Heiligenstein, 410 S. State; 

James Lev/is, R.R. 2 

FREEP0RT: Wade Collier, 1251 W, Staver 

FULTS: Wallace Altes 

GALESBURG: William Tomlin, 930 Arnold; 

Sharon Zahora, 1149 N. Academy 

GEFF: Lois Gabbard 

GENEVA: Allan Comstock,423 Dodson 

GILLESPIE: Dolores Deck, 607 Calcari 

GODFREY: Linda Barnhorn, Villa Ridge 

GRANITE CITY: Linda Lester, 2729 

Washington 

HARRISBURG: Jerry Cotton, RFD 1; Lela 

Lamb, 422 W. Homer 

HARVEY: Donna Whitlock, 14910 Vine; Sherry 

Kosek, 16331 Emerald; Susan Amberg, 16005 

R. Lathrop -more* 



HERRIN: Donna Duncan, 204 0* 21st; Carol 

Gioannini, 316 N. 17th; Barbara McMillan, 

200 N. 8th; Barbara Goerke, 600 S. 13th; 

Mary Gornatti, 28 Orchard Dr.; Susan Owen, 

409 S. 12th; James Pierson, 316 H. 20th; 

Jack Wiggins, 712 N. 18th; Paul Uatkins, 

521 S. 23rd; June Craig, 505 N. 12th; 

Howard Rushing, 420 S. 16th 

HIGHLAND: Jay Boulanger, 1220 Main; Mary 

Donnelly, 814 6th; Michael Southard, 

1300 13th 

HIGHLAND PARK: Elizabeth Glathart, 1470 

Lincoln PI, 

HILLSBORO: Janet Zupanci, R.R. 1 

HOMER: William Block, 603 S. Main 

H0MEW00D: Lynn Colvert, 1259 Hickory Rd. 

JACKSONVILLE: Donna Hurrelbrink 
JERSEYVILLE: Roberta Krause, 803 W. Spruce 
JOHNSTON CITY: Marie Hughes, 1303 Noah 
J0NESB0R0: Mary Berrier; Ginger Whiting 
JUNCTION: Mary Kanady 

KANKAKEE: Alan Ashton, 804 S. Evergreen; 
Linda Reilly, Grinell Rd,; Robert Sapp, 
569 S. Elm; Gerald Simmons, 233 Illinois; 
Michael Abbott, 730 Park Dr. 
KILBOURNE: Maria Pratt 
KINMUNDY: Franklin Helm 

LAKE ZURICH: Barbara Nemeth, R.R. 1 
LEBANON: Mary Putt, 6 Roger Dr. 
LIBERTYVILLE: Ann Cullen, 152 Arlington Dr 
LITCHFIELD: Harley Logsdon, 204 3, 
Chestnut; Gary Keiser, 1710 N, Monroe 
LOUISVILLE: Stanley Newby 
LOVES PARK: Marjorie Stevens, 428 Burrwood 

MACOMB: Robert Randolph, 509 E. Calhoun 
MAKANDA: Ann Ross on 

MARION: Robert Hickey, 1205 N. Market; 
James Lashley, 503 Everett; Raymond 
McClellan, 705 N. Johnson; Ronnie Hickey, 
1205 N, Market; Archie Henderson, 602 S, 
Hadfield; Robert Moyer, 41 G S. Court; 
Stephen Davis, R.R. 3; David Freund, 907 
W. Concord; Stephen Patrick, 312 W. 
Hendrickson; Benny Francis, 908 W. Maiden 
MARKHAM: Lee Reigler, 2900 Stafford 
MASCOUTAH: Mary Pastrovich, R.R.2; Mary 
Siebe, 102 E. South; Rosalie Haas, R.R.I; 
Jerilyn Shelton, 1256 Lincoln; Vernette 
Going, R.R.2 

MATTOON: Anne Rodger s, R.R. 4 
MAYWOOD: Douglas Larsen, 303 S,2nd; 
Irene Fuller, 1230 S. 11th 
MCLEANSBORO: Carol Sturm, RFD 2; Larry 
McDonald, 404 E. Jefferson 
MEND0N: Virginia Mealiff 



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METAMORA: Norma Barrow 

METROPOLIS: Paul Clark, 1123 Market; Ellen 
Carter, 503 W. 19th 

MIDLOTHIAN: David Barton, 14543 St. Louis 
MILLER CITY: Michael Yates 
MORRISON: Richard Cady, R.R.3 
MORRISONVILLE: John Kemp, R.R.3 
MT. CARMEL: Raymond Bosecker, R.R.2; Rita 
Clark, 1107 Bainum 

MT. CARROLL: Stephen Flickinger, 511 N. 
Clay 

MT. VERNON: William Dement, 315 S. 21st; 
Linda Goss, 4 Evergreen Dr.; Marshall 
Highsmith, Rt. 7 

MOWEAQUA: Ronald Giberson, 216 E. Main 
MULBERRY GROVE: Marilyn Perkins 
MURPHYSBORO: Merle Evans, R.R.4; Jane Kupel 
222C Pine; Sandra McQuay, RFD 3; Frank 
Puttman, 103 S. 13th; Edgar Raines Jr., 
2123 Pine; Fred Smith, 2131 Wall; James 
McDowell, 247 S. 8th; Thelma Pierson; 1C29 
Elm; Richard Winters, 213G Spruce; Charles 
Payne Jr., 1933 Logan; Earl Struck, R.R.3 

NEWTON: Ilene James, 522 Jourdan; Sharon 
Wartsbaugh, R.R.2 

NORMAL: Patricia Barth, 1012 N. Linden 
NORRIS CITY: Mary Bolerjack, Rt. 2 



ROLLING MEADOW: Beverly Bycroft, 2300 
George 

ROSAMOND: Rosemary McClain 
ROSICLARE: Michael Humm 

ST. CHARLES: Millard Ruddell Jr. 
SALEM: Phillip Vance, 909 N. Reel 
SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE: Michael Adams, 
Qtrs. 1403 G 

SESSER: Frederick Sample 
SPARTA: Verna Kessel, R.R.3 
SPRINGFIELD: Patricia Meiron, 2032 E. 
Capitol; Richard Cochran, 2501 S. 12th; 
Billie Pedigo, 2401 S. Walnut; Louis 
Marcy, 1732 E. Keys; Gail Mrkvicka, 450 
W. Canedy 

,STEElEVILLE:Judith Vaughn, 202 W. Main; 
William Nowers, 502 S. Randall; Janice 
Kaitschuk, 202 W. 1st 
STRASBURG: Kenneth Meeker 
SUMMIT: James Baricovich, 5412 Hunt 
SUMMER: Daniel Dorney, Marion Waggoner 

TAYLORVILLE: William Gillen, 625 Taylor- 

ville; Ralph Trost, R.R.2; David Jacobs, 

910 W. Rich 

TILDEN: Fredna Carlson 

TROY: James Pauk, R.R.I 



OAK LAWN: Richard Barlow, 9237 Orchard Ln.; VANDALIA: Ted Tischauer, 631 Fillmore 



Donald Babb, 5813 W. 93rd 

0'FALLON: Jeanette Kampen, 305 W. 8th; 

Mary Lowry, 211 Edward; Marilyn Maibes, 

312 E. Third; Thomas Hardy, Rt. 1; Joann 

Arthur, 304 Amhurst 

OGLESBY: Linda Foster 

OKAWVILLE: Maryann Maxeiner, R.R.I 



VIENNA: Donald Harper 

VIRDEN: John Roth, 150 Stoddard 

WALNUT: Nicholas Pasqual, 101 Heaton 
WALSH: Joyce Rathmacher 
WARRENSBURG: Gloria Stogsdill 
WASHINGTON: John Tunnell, 721 Monroe 



0LNEY: William Griffin, 214 S. Fair; Sallie WATERLOO: June Mueller, 617 N. Market; 



Marks, R.R.6 

PALESTINE: James Bush, 211 S. Wilson; 

Victor Corder, R.R.2; Sara Buntin, 100 

Jackson 

PALOS HEIGHTS: Lynn Vuich, 12001 S. Mason 

PANA: Dorothy Kleinik, R.R.4 



Ronald Brandt, 420 S. Library; Patricia 

Hardy, 102 W. 1st; Peggy Tucker, 207 Main 

WEST CHICAGO: Janet Fitzsimmons 

WEST FRANKFORT: Judith Delap, 1009 E. 

Cleveland; Theresa Gautreaux, 309 E. Elm; 

James Matheny, Rt. 1 

WHEAT0N:Nancy Kreftraeyer, 1114 Lexington; 



PARK FOREST: Diane Ensminger, 123 Blackhawk Eva Murdock, 904 Ranch Rd. 



PATOKA: Mary Gerrish 
PEKIN: Lynn Ripper, 1504 Charlotte, Jane 
Riley, 1104 S. Seventh; Gary Welch, 309 
Delshire; Rita Barker, 109 Fulton Rd. 
PEORIA: Cheryl Happe, 3220 N. Sheridan 

RANTOUL: Marianne Wiley, 360 Illinois Dr.; 
Karen Worley, 760 Eastview Dr.; Roger 
Hawley, 1465 Mather Dr. 
RAYMOND: Terry Stogsdill 
RIDGWAY: William Bradley 
RIVER GROVE: Gerald Plotkin, 2442 Clarke 
R0CKF0RD: Jane Hoffman, 1653 Fifth Ave.; 
Sandra Maynard, 416 29th 



WHITE HALL: Larry Ash, 429 N. Carr 

WILLIAMSFIELD: Mary Gibson; Michael 

McClellan 

WILMINGTON: Donald Caldwell, 203 Fulton 

WINDSOR: Sue Ann Martz 

WINFIELD: Patricia Morrison, 305 Roosevelt 

WINTHROP HARBOR: Victoria Ragno, 923 

Fulton Ave. 

WOOD RIVER: Chyeral Esterlein, 547 Acton 

XENIA: Keith Colclasure, Alice Anderson 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




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12-4-62 
Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec, — Dairy farmers may get an extra ton or more of milk 
annually from each of their top quality dairy cows if they will feed heavier amounts 
of grain, Donald Hillman, Michigan State University dairy extension specialist, 
told a Southern Illinois University Dairy Day audience Tuesday afternoon (Dec. 4). 

Hillman was among several specialists on the day-long program co-sponsored by 
the SIU animal industries department and the SIU extension division. The meeting 
was concerned chiefly with more grain feeding for higher milk production and with 
milk components. 

"There is no use breeding dairy cows for high milk production if you don't 
feed for it," Hillman said. "Many good dairy farmers unknowingly underfeed their 
best cows and never find out how much milk they are capable of producing 
economically," he continued. The prevalent practice of feeding grain in ratio 
to the cow's milk production is not satisfactory for establishing the cow's potential 
A cow needs to be challenged early in the lactation period to get the most out of 
a grain feeding program. 

Michigan State recommends starting to build up the grain feeding rate three 
weeks before the cow freshens, increasing the rate a pound or two a day from a 
beginning quota of six to eight pounds of concentrates daily. This helps the cow's 
rumen, appetite and eating habits to adjust to liberal grain feeding before calving 
and puts the animal on a high level of feeding during the early period of lactation. 
Three or four days after calving the offerings of concentrates should be incrased 
about two pounds per day until either the cow's appetite or milk production level 
reaches a peak—usually in 30 to 60 days. Then the grain feeding level can be 
adjusted to maintaining milk production economically. 



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Similar findings were reported by Richard Bernett, SIU graduate student from 
Dewey, and Harry Eaton, dairy research supervisor for a Quincy feed manufacturing 
firm. Bernett reported on an SIU experiment comparing production and milk 
composition responses of dairy cows on free-choice and controlled-grain feeding 
programs for 112 days. Eaton, citing results of a 240-day study, suggested high- 
level controlled rather than free-choice grain feeding. His free-choice group 
produced 10 pounds more milk daily but netted $75 less per cow than the group 
receiving all the good quality hay desired and grain at the rate of one pound per 
three and a half to four pounds of milk produced. 

Guy M. Crews, program director for the American Jersey Cattle Club, Columbus, 
0. , said there is real magic in milk protein and suggested dairymen and the dairy 
industry ought to sell the idea to consumers. Whole milk and cheese are considerably 
cheaper sources of protein than red meats, and milk protein provides the added 
bonus of containing desirable amino acids which carry nitrogen to body tissues in 
a form ready to use and increase the protein rating of other foods, such as cereals 
and breads. Milk protein is meetly casein (7C to 00 percent) and lastalbumin and ranks 
ahead of all other foods except eggs as a common source of protein in the diet of 
human beings, 

Howard H. Olson, SIU dairy specialist, enumerated developments in testing milk 
for nonfat solids content and said a recent introduction of an Orange G Dye binding 
method has made possible a quick and inexpensive test for protein in milk. He 
urged dairymen to exert efforts toward getting routine testing of milk for nonfat 
solids content and suggested seeking the cooperation of breeding associations and 
extension services in this direction. 

David Wieckert, another SIU dairy specialist, said dairymen will be able to 
improve through breeding and selection the nonfat solids production ability of 
dairy animals just as they have done in raising butterfat production. The process 
may be slower, however, he said. Both are inherited characteristics but are subject 
to variation by outside conditions of environment and management. 

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Steel outer ring of nev/ Physical Education-Military Training Building 

underway at Southern Illinois University has gone up at south edge of the campus. 

Next step v/ill be the erection of 32 large beams forming roof of the 300-foot 

diameter dome, expected to begin Thursday (Dec. 6). The $4,2 million building 

is scheduled for completion in January, 1964. 

PHOTO BY KIOTO SERVICE 12-5-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 






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From Bill Lyons 12 - 5 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — A group of 30 high school English teachers who 
spent last summer at Southern Illinois University learning new approaches to 
their subject will meet here Friday (Dec, 7) to report on home-school progress. 

Participants in SIU's Summer Institute for English Teachers, one of 20 
sponsored throughout the U.S. by the Commission on English of the College Entrance 
Examination 3oard, concentrated on fresh ways to present the three main ingredients 
of secondary school English— language, literature and composition. 

The Institute included instruction by three SIU English department faculty 
members, Georgia Winn, Roy Pickett and Fred Lingle. Miss Winn has been spending 
half time this fall in follow-up visits to the schools of Institute members, 
helping them outline new curricula stressing the main aims of the summer project. 

At Friday's session, teachers will discuss mutual problems and describe how 
Institute course materials are working in their own programs. Discussion sessions 
will be under Miss Winn's direction at the Agriculture Building seminar room. 

The Commission on English in 1959 started a five-year program of analyzing 
English teaching conditions in U.S. high schools, stating that programs needed 
"to be materially strengthened." SIU's Institute, an outgrowth of the study, 
emphasized teaching more writing as part of regular work, more intensive reading, 
including non-literary, and language studies through reading and writing. 

Teachers selected to attend the Institute last summer came from Illinois and 
three adjoining states. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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12 - 5- 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Holiday drinking is causing an increasing number 
of traffic accidents, Dr. James E. Aaron, coordinator of Southern Illinois 
University's Safety Center, warned today. 

More than half of the drivers in fatal accidents have been drinking, he 
said, and admonished southern Illinois drivers that "just a couple of social 
drinks will impair your driving ability and increase risks," 

Aaron said persons whose holiday plans include driving Christmas Eve should 
use extra caution. From 5 p.m. to midnight Dec. 24 are among the most dangerous 
times in the holidays for motorists, he said. These hours claim an average of 
12 deaths an hour, compared to an average of less than five an hour during the 
next 24 hours. 

Three driver errors account for most Christmas crashes, Aaron said. These 
are driving too fast, failing to yield the right-of-way and driving to the left 
of center. 

He cautioned southern Illinois drivers to start trips early* to slow down 
at night and in bad weather, to obey the speed laws, and to "recognise your moral 
responsibility to be good drivers during a religious season dedicated to good 
will and brotherly love." 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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12-5-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Dec. — The National Science Foundation has awarded grants 
totaling $123,300 to Southern Illinois University to conduct summer institutes 
for high school biology and mathematics teachers. 

It marks the sixth consecutive year the NSF has selected Southern as one 
of the campus centers for programs aimed at giving teachers updated courses in 
the subjects they teach, 

SIU was granted $59,700 for an eight-week institute for biology teachers 
to be directed by Isaac Shechmeister of the microbiology department. Between 
45 and 50 teachers will be accepted for the program, and 14 of them will be 
selected to take special courses in the experimental high school biology curriculum 
being tested by the American Institute of Biological Sciences. Shechmeister said 
NSF officials have promised continued support for two additional summers. 

A grant of $63,600 was awarded the University to offer a mathematics 
institute under the direction of Morton Kenner for approximately 50 teachers. 
Like the biology program, it will feature visiting lecturers and special staffing 
provided from the grant funds. 

Those accepted will be eligible for stipends ranging to $75 a week and $15 
weekly for dependents, plus travel allowances. 

SIU also has applied for National Science Foundation support of a summer 
science training program for high- ability high school students. It would be 
similar to ones conducted the past four summers and be directed by George Gass, 
physiology. Acceptance of the proposal is expected early in 1963. 



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From Bill Lyons J^ 4 12-5-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec, — High school musicians and teachers from 25 downstate 
Illinois counties will gather at Southern Illinois University Saturday (Dec, 3) 
for a district festival of the Illinois Music Educators Association. 

For the teachers, the day will be a series of clinics, discussions and 
demonstrations conducted by SIU musicians and IMEA officials. Included will be 
a string workshop headed by Warren Van Bronkhorst, new conductor of the Southern 
Illinois Symphony Orchestra, and a session devoted to new band music, played by 
the SIU Concert Band, 

For the 300 prep musicians in attendance the festival will be a round of 
auditions for chairs in the district's All State Band, Choir and Orchestra. 
Winners will represent the district at the statewide IMEA convention in Peoria, 
Jan, 25, 

The selected band, chorus and orchestra will perform a public concert 
Saturday at 7 p,m, in Shryock Auditorium. Guest conductors will be Franklin Kreider 
of Collinsville, band; Richard Hoffland, Millkin University, chorus; and 
Peter Labella, Joliet, orchestra. 

Leo Sliva of East Richland High School, Olney, is IMEA district chairman 
and will lead the main business meeting. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



12 - 5 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — A group of 30 high school English teachers who 
spent last summer at Southern Illinois University learning new approaches to 
their subject will meet here Friday (Dec. 7) to report on home-school progress. 

Participants in SIU's Summer Institute for English Teachers, one of 20 
sponsored throughout the U.S. by the Commission on English of the College Entrance 
Examination Board, concentrated on fresh ways to present the three main ingredients 
of secondary school English— language, literature and composition. 

The Institute included instruction by three SIU English department faculty 
members, Georgia Winn, Roy Pickett and Fred Lingle. Miss Winn has been spending 
half time this fall in follow-up visits to the schools of Institute members, 
helping them outline new curricula stressing the maixi aims of the summer project. 

At Friday's session, teachers will discuss mutual problems and describe how 
Institute course materials are working in their own programs. Discussion sessions 
will be under Miss Winn's direction at the Agriculture Building seminar room. 

The Commission on English in 1959 started a five-year program of analyzing 
English teaching conditions in U.S. high schools, stating that programs needed 
"to be materially strengthened." SIU's Institute, an outgrowth of the study, 
emphasized teaching more writing as part of regular work, more intensive reading, 
including non-literary, and language studies through reading and writing. 

Teachers selected to attend the Institute last summer came from Illinois and 
three adjoining states. 



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From Bill Lyons 12-6-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453 - 2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec, — A special course on maintenance and operation of 
facilities and grounds for church camps will be held at Southern Illinois 
University's Little Giant Camp Jan. 21-25, it was announced today by Lloyd B, Sharp, 
director of the Outdoor Education Association, Inc., and professor of outdoor 
education at Southern, 

"The aim of this special course is to give training in the skills that are 
needed to carry on the maintenance and operation of facilities and grounds for 
church camps," Sharp said. 

Among the faculty, he said, will be the Rev, James Ballinger, ejcecutive 
director , camping and conferences, Christian Churches in the United States and 
Canada; William Freeberg, chairman, SIU department of recreation and outdoor 
education; and Larry Sheffield, park ranger, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 

Sharp said the course will include presentation and discussion of individual 
camp managers programs; field trips; techniques in site layout and development; 
food management; health, sanitation and safety; and other practical aspects of 
camp organization. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



C\/J 12 - 6 •- 62 

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Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec, — Widespread use of outdoor Christmas decorations 
has caused a whole new set of safety hazards, Dr # Frank Bridges of Southern 
Illinois University's Safety Center warned today. Among them is the threat of 
electrocution, as well as fire, 

"Too many homeowners rush to the basement to salvage discarded extension 
cords when the family decides to decorate the front of the house," Bridges said, 
"They string cords with frayed insulation or faulty connections along the damp 
ground and across the edge of the roof, exposed to snow and rain, 

"A child or family pet, perfectly 'grounded 1 on the wet soil, touches the 
faulty wire and the resulting short circuit can be lethal," 

Bridges advises using only approved outdoor-type wiring, protected by a fuse 
of sufficiently low amperage to "blow" in case of an overload. 

The Christmas-New Year holiday is a peak time for home accidents, Bridges 
said and he urged southern Illinoisans to make sure their table, window and house 
decorations are safe as well as beautiful. Special precautions should be taken 
with the Christmas tree, A common cause of holiday fires is the use of too many 
lights or faulty wiring. Foil icicles touching exposed wires can cause short 
circuits. 

In table decorations, Bridges warned candles should be safely distant from 
greenry, place cards or crepe paper. Electric candles are safest, 

A final admonition: mothers and sisters should remember to deck the halls 
while wearing low-heeled shoes and stand only on ladders or sturdy step-stools 
while reaching high places. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



12-6-62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Home sewing is no longer dependent upon economic 
cycles but has become a high fashion function in its own right, according to 
Rose Padgett, textiles research scientist at Southern Illinois University School 
of Home Economics, 

In 1960, home sewers in America used an estimated 625 million yards of cloth, 
including cottons, silks, synthetics and woolens, Miss Padgett said. From 1940 
to 1960, home sewing machines have increased 10 million to a total of approximately 
40 million and sales of home sewing patterns have jumped from 6C million to 100 
million. 

"The size of the family income apparently has little effect on the amount of 
home sewing, until the income exceeds $10,000 annually," Miss Padgett said. 
Teenagers are sewing more. In a third of the homes having sewing machines, daughters 
join the mothers in using the machines, and almost 90 per cent of the daughters 
continue to sew after marriage. 

One estimate indicates that in 1961 teenage girls spent more than $71 million 
on fabrics for home sewing. 

Seasonal and geographic factors are involved in the home sewing market, she 
pointed out. January is the two-to-one favorite month in the northwest as compared 
with the west, while November seems to be the peak month in both areas. The south, 
middle Atlantic, and central states favor October. Few want to sew in the summer, 
regardless of geography. 

Fabric properties desired by home-sewing consumers she listed in order as: first, 
color fastness; second, maximum shrinkage not to exceed 1 per cent; third, crease 
resistance; and fourth, machine washability and drip-dry qualities. 



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From Bill Lyons 12-6-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — For the home that boasts a fireplace, a Yule Log 
and handmade mantle decorations can vie with the Christmas tree as the focal point 
of the holiday decor, 

Kay Jacobs, Southern Illinois University home economist, today listed a variety 
of chemicals, available at the drug store, which will yield colored flames, either 
singly or in combination. 

For yellow, use salt; blue, copper sulphate; green, boric acid or borax; 
orange, calcium chloride; red, strontium nitrate; violet, potassium chlorate; 
purple, lithium chloride. 

"Paint a small log with a solution made of two parts chemical to five of 
shellac, or soak the log in a solution of one pound chemical to one gallon water," 
she said. "Let dry at least 4G hours." 

The same chemicals may be mixed with sawdust and poured over a burning fire 
to produce colored flames, she said. 

For the mantle, she suggested dancing snowballs, popcorn Christmas trees 
and decorated make-believe candles. Her recipes: 

DANCING SNOWBALLS 

Fill a goldfish or other clear glass bowl three-fourths full of water. Add 
red or green vegetable coloring, "enough to make a good rich color." Add 1 
tablespoon of citric acid and tx*o tablespoons of baking soda. Add a handful of 
ordinary mothballs, "and the fun begins." 

"The mothballs will become coated with little silver bubbles and begin to 
dance a merry jig— up and down, up and down," she said. "If the Dancing Snowballs 
seem to get a bit lazy and their tempo slows down, add more citric acid and more 
soda to increase their pep." 

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POPCOLH CHRISTMAS TREES 

2% cups sifted confectioners' sugar Green food coloring 
1 egg white 6 ice cream cones 

i teaspoon water 3 cups popped corn 

Red cinnamon candies 
Combine the sugar, egg white and water, and beat to make a smooth icing. Tint a 
delicate green with a few drops of green food coloring. Spread the icing over the 
outside of the ice cream cones, using about 2 tablespoons on each cone. While the 
icing is still soft, press popped corn (about % cup) all over the surface of each 
cone. Dot here and there between the kernels of corn with red cinnamon candies. 

MAKE - BELIEVE CANDLES 

6% cups fine soap flakes 2 cups boiling water 

Mix soap flakes and water and beat until fluffy and dry. Spread on paper tubes 
(from rolls of waxed paper or foil). Let dry. Spray with gilt, red or green 
color or with canned "snow". 



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From Bill Lyons 12-6-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — High school seniors who plan to enter Southern 
Illinois University in the fall of 1963 should make application now, Wilbur Venerable . 
acting associate director of admissions, said today. 

Seniors should write to the Admissions Office, Southern Illinois University, 
Carbondale, requesting application forms for admission and university housing. 
A booklet on SIU and a tiro-page sheet of instructions detailing steps necessary 
for admission is included in the packet. 

Venerable said all enrolling freshmen must take the American College Test 
which is given at most senior high schools during the year. Students at schools 
itfhich do not give the ACT test usually have opportunity to take it elsewhere. 

Illinois students ranking in the upper two-thirds of their class can be 
granted tentative admittance at the end of their seventh high school semester 
subject to successful completion of their high school work. In-state students 
in the lower one-third of their class will be considered for fall quarter enrollment 
only if they score high on the ACT examination. Otherwise they must seek enrollment 
in the summer quarter or wait until the following winter quarter. 

Out-of-state high school seniors must rank in the upper one-half of their 
class for admission to the fall semester. 

Students planning to attend the Edwardsville classes should write to the 
Registrar at Edwardsville. 

University housing is not assigned until students are officially accepted 
for registration. The Admissions Office begins notifying students of their 
admission around the first of February, Venerable said. 



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From Bill Lyons 12-6-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

Number 434 in a weekly series — "It Happened in Southern Illinois" — a series 
consisting of regional folklore and historical accounts suitable for feature, 
column, or editorial use. 

LOGAN'S LIFE OF POLITICS 
John W. Allen 
Southern Illinois University 

At the end of the Civil War John A. Logan, 39 years old, was southern Illinois* 
most famous native son. He already had attained distinction in two fields, politics 
and the military. Despite his swarthy complexion, raven locks, fierce black 
mustache and rugged physique, Logan was "Egypt's fair haired boy." When the war 
ended, so did opportunity for further advancement in the military. Logan returned to 
a first love, politics. Some believe that it really was not a return to politics, 
that Logan had not at any time ceased to be the politician. Studying his career, 
it is not difficult for one to arrive at such a conclusion. 

Logan was literally born into politics. The time, the man, and the issues 
apparently were met. North-South tensions were mounting. "Egypt" was southern in 
its sympathies, so was Logan. It was a time of rugged politics and he was rugged. 
His services as district attorney in many southern Illinois counties had made him 
widely known. His service in the Illinois General Assembly had drawn attention. 
Southern Illinois was solidly Democratic and Logan was a Democrat. Members of the 
Logan family were powerful in the party's councils. 

Congressman Marshall of the Ninth Illinois District had announced that he would 
not be a candidate for re-election. The situation apparently was made to order for 
Logan, He accordingly was a candidate in the November 1G53 election and was swept 
into office by an approximate six to one majority. His political star definitely 
was on the rise, 

Logan and his intelligent, vivacious and ambitious young (21) wife went to 

Washington a week before the opening of the Thirty-sixth Congress. In Congress, 

Logan was no skrinking violet. He was aggressive, contentious, ambitious, earnest, 

prejudiced, bluff and blunt when he thought it necessary. He was brace and impetuous 

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a man who gave more thought to the achievement of an end than to the method by 
which he achieved in. He was highly critical of the national administration. 
In many v/ays, Logan was a unique individual, a typical politician of that 
era. Personally, he definitely attracted or repelled people, there were no 
neutrals. The great majority were friendly. So far as learned, no scandal was 
ever attached to his private life. Re was a warm-hearted father and a devoted 
husband to a fiercely loyal wife. In fact, much that Logan achieved in both politic:: 
and the military can be attributed to the help given by his wife. To both Mr, and 
Mrs, Logan, politics was not a sideline. It was a trade at which they worked 
unceasingly. 

In 1360 Logan was overwhelmingly re-elected. The new Congress was different. 
The secession movement was definitely underway. Congressmen from southern states 
were leaving. Officers of the army and navy were transferring their loyalty to 
the South* Logan, complemented for his "political acrobaties" and decisiveness at 
crucial times, hesitated. Many of his southern Illinois friends and supporters 
were openly for the South, even advocating the separation of the southern section 
and its attachment to the Confederacy, 

Logan could not long remain neutral. People were criticizing his indecision. 
In September, 1361, five months after Sumpter, he returned to southern Illinois 
and announced his decision to raise a regiment. This plan evidently had been under 
secret consideration, Logan became its Colonel, 

His action at Henry and Donelson brought him a commission as a brigadier 
general. Though Logan had declared that he would have no part of politics until th 
war was ended, he often was making speeches that definitely sounded political. 

No one questions the physical courage of Logan, described as the "Screaming 
Eagle." The courageous action that brought that name was displayed in the battle 
before Atlanta where he took the place of fallen McPherson, Hatless, begrimed, 
brandishing a pistol and mounted on a foaming black horse, Logan was all of an 
inspiring military leader, -ja- 



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From Bill Lyons 12-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondaie, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Lawrence Dietz, DeSoto (111.) dairyman, was 
re-elected to a second one-year term as a state director of the American Dairy 
Association of Illinois during the organization's District 11 meeting at Southern 
Illinois University Thursday (Dec. 6). 

Seven district directors also were re*elected. They are Lawrence Hilton, 
Makanda; Ervin Eigenrauch, Marion (Route 3); Gilbert Bigham, Pinckneyville; 
Pete Perona, Christopher; Howard Pinker ton, Murphysboro; P.D. Dillow, Jonesboro; 
and William Taake, Ullin. About 50 persons attended the meeting. 

Milton Geuther, Joliet, state manager of the American Dairy Association, said 
Illinois dairy farmers contributed $390,000 to the organization last year for its 
milk and dairy products promotional and research programs. Farmers support the 
ADA through a voluntary two-cents-per-hundred-pounds-of-milk checkoff system with 
cooperating dairy plants. Nationally, the ADA has a $7,000,000 budget this year, 
he said. Three-fourths of the money contributed to the state organization goes to 
the national association and the rest is spent in the state for similar advertising, 
promotional, educational research and administrative purposes. 

William Boyd, a membership cultivation representative of the state association, 
said 90 of the state's 110 Grade A milk plants are cooperators with 73.4 per cent of 
the producers taking part in the program. The percentage is not as high for cheese, 
dried, evaporated and filled milk plants, he said. 



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Neither rain, snow, nor final exams can stay these coeds from swift completion 

of their appointed rounds— they're toting the Christmas mail for their sorority. 

Delta Zetas (from left) Geraldine Berry, Elmhurst; Carol Blust, Belleville; 

Phyllis Hartman, Wheaton; and Judith Myerscough, Taylorville; mindful of upcoming 

holiday activities back home, say "it never hurts to get in a fextf licks early* " 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 12-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



Among 32 new initiates of Southern Illinois University's chapter of Phi 

Kappa Phi, scholastic honor society, are, from left: seated: Karen Gilso, 

Chicago (5227 N. LaPorte); Ann Cullen, Libertyville; Patricia Ann Horrall, 

Willowsprings; standing: Hilary Hsu, Hong Kong, China; Yousef Danesh-Khoshboo, 

Tehran, Iran; and Harry Seymour, Macomb, 

PHOTO BY INFORMATION SERVICE 12-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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From Bill Lyons 12-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

NOTE LISTING OF STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND HOME TOWNS 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — For hundreds of students at Southern Illinois 
University, religious activities and associations form the core of their 
extra-curricular life, and hundreds more are touched through residence hall 
discussion groups, special programs and campus-wide religious observances. 

Eleven student religious foundations, representing a wide range of religious 
denominations, join in an Inter-Faith Council to foster inter-faith understanding. 
This council coordinates the campus-wide "Religion in Life Week" held each January. 

Aims of most of the organizations are three- fold— spiritual, intellectual and 
social. With few exceptions, the foundations are directed by trained religious 
leaders— either one or more religious educators or the minister, priest or rabbi 
of a local church. In addition, lay leaders from the University faculty serve as 
advisers or board members. 

Several of the foundations offer college credit courses in religion, which 
students may take as electives. A minor in religion may also be presented by 
students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences by completing religion courses 
offered by at least two of the foundations plus required work in such departments 
as English, history, philosophy, psychology and sociology. 

A substantial number of ministerial students are enrolled at SIU— approximately 
30 taking their religious training through the Baptist College of Bible, associated 
with the Baptist Foundation, and about 15 Methodist students who are planning 
ministerial careers. 

Many of the foundations operate student centers adjacent to the University 
campus, which serve as the focus and the directing force both both religious and 
social activities for students of the various faiths. 

These centers range from new especially designed buildings providing worship, 

library, lounge and recreational facilities to renovated former residences. Some 

provide dormitory facilities as well, and a number are equipped to serve meals. 

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A new $300,000 Newman Center is under construction by the Catholic Church— the 
first unit of a preposed large complex; a former residence has been purchased by 
the Missouri Synod of the Lutheran Church for the use of Gamma Delta, student 
organization; and a new chapel is being built by Epiphany Lutheran Church (Lutheran 
Church in America) which will also serve as a student center. 

Both the Wesley Foundation for Methodist students and the Student Christian 
Foundation, an interdenominational organization, have new buildings constructed 
within the past few years. The Baptist Foundation is unique in that its building 
is located within the University campus confines, since it was built years before tL 
University began its expansion program. This foundation provides classrooms, 
chapel, library, cafeteria and dormitories for both men and women students. 

Canterbury House, a former residence, is maintained as an Episcopal center and 
provides classrooms and dormitory facilities for men students. 

Another large interdenominational student organization is the SIU chapter of 
Inter-Varisty Christian Fellowship, which meets at the new University Center, 
offering Bible studies, prayer groups, speakers and social event". The Jewish 
Student Association meets at a new Jewish temple near Carbondale; the Unitarian** 
Universalist Channing Club meets at the local Unitarian Church. Although there 
is no Eastern Orthodox church in Carbondale, a priest is sent from the St. Louis 
Federation to conduct services periodically for students of that faith and the 
Eastern Orthodox Club holds regular meetings. 

Student leaders for these organizations include the following: 

INTER-FAITH COUNCIL 

CARBONDALE-- Jean Lobenstein, secretary 
PINCKNEYVILLE— Virginia Heisner, vice president 
SPRINGFIELD— Jerry Homan (209 N. Illinois), president 

Rev. Ray Rist, adviser; Miss Elisabeth Mullins, coordinator of student 
activities, fiscal sponsor. 

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CHRISTIAH SCIENCE ORGANIZATION 

AURORA— Nika Zahnan (50 Circle), corresponding secretary 

BELLEVILLE— Janet Hoffman (412 W. Gilbert), historian; Robin Dintelman (729 S. 

Pennsylvania), fall term reader 
CHICAGO— Linnea Lundberg (6012 Nassau), recording secretary 
EDWARDSVILLE— Janice Bivens (Troy Road), winter term reader 
ENERGY— Keith Swim, president 

LOMBARD— John Hull (216 E. Hickory), vice president 
VILLA PARK— Jim Robertson (421 S. Ardmore), treasurer 

Dr. Merrell Moeller, associate professor of applied science, faculty adviser, 

CANTERBURY HOUSE 

(officers to be elected Dec, 9) 

INTER- VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 

GLEN ELLYN— Marianne McCartney (232 Hill St.), vice president 
OAK LATIN— John Peterson (4331 W. Fairfax) , treasurer 
PEORIA— Anita Johnson (103 Kickapoo Norwood), secretary 
PALATINE— Richard Brodkorb (Arlington Road), president 
ROSELLE— Sharon Petty (620 S. Roselle Road), publicity chairman 

Miss Ruth Bauner, assistant education librarian, faculty sponsor. 

JEWISH STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

SIC0ICLE— Staurt Sakens (C635 Central Park), vice president; Toby Ettlinger (5229 

Grove), social chairman 
W. HARTFORD, CONN.— Gail F. Cohen (149 Brewster Road), president; Ann D. Levine 

(321 Oakwood), secretary-treasurer 

Eugen Schoenfeld, sociology department, faculty adviser. 

GAMMA DELTA (Missouri Synod Lutheran) 

CARLYLE— Mary Scott, treasurer 

EDWARDSVILLE — Robert Kriege, vice president 

ELMHURST— Diane E. Janzen (144 Avon), recording secretary 

MASCOUTAH— Vernette Going, corresponding secretary 

TAYLORVILLE— Stewart Schrodt, president 

WILLIAMSVILLE, Judy Eilers, reporter 

Dr. Kenneth Orton, assistant professor of special education, faculty sponsor, 

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION (LCA) 

ADDISON— Judy Anderson (22W37C Army Trail), secretary treasurer 
LINCOLN, NEB.— Louise Shadley (2849 Everett), president 

Dr. Myrl Alexander, director, Center for Study of Crime, Delinquency and 
Corrections, is faculty sponsor* 

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. WggljBY FOUNDATION 

ALPHA— Diane Bodeen, vice president 

ALTAMONT — Judy Buzzard, Freshman Council 

BRIGHTON— Dave Swan, Freshman Council 

CARBONDALE— Charles Wright, president; John Wright, service chairman; Bill Spencer, 

Grace Church felloxrekip representative 
CARLYLE— Ron Quick, treasurer 
CARMI— Joe Hall, Freshman Council 

CENTRALIA— Charlotte Richardson, "Perspective" (nevzspaper) editor 
COULTERVILLE— Michael Patton, publicity chairman 
DOWNS— Steven Fairfield, intramurals chairman 
EDWARDS VTLLE— John Parker, Freshman Council 
GALATIA— Ruby Knight, strategy chairman' 

GRANITE CITY— David West, State Methodist Student Movement representative 
HARRISBURG— Sarah Cotton, Freshman Council 
LAWRENCEVILLE— Sandy Milner, Freshman Council 
LEBANON— Mary Putt, State Methodist Student Movement secretary 
MCLEANS BORO— Pat Eaton, Kappa Phi representative 
METROPOLIS— Norma Blackwell, secretary 
MT. VERNON— David Myers, Inter faith Council representative; Ruth Ann Woodrome, 

social life chairman 
MURPHYSBORO— Jane Kupel, Freshman Council 
PEKIN— Jane Riley, First Church fellowship representative 
SAN JOSE— Neil Yontz, Freshman Council 

SESSER— Linda Van Hoorebeke, Inter faith Council alternate 
SPRINGFIELD— ICaryn Tuxhorn, music chairman 
OCALA, FLORIDA— Jenna McMillen, World Christian Community chairman 

Rev. Ronald Seibert, director; Rev. Donald Carlton, associate director. 

NEWMAN FOUNDATION 

BELLEVILLE— Alice Wesolik, first vice president 

BREESE— Dave Richter, treasurer 

DAMIANSVILLE— Robert Euehne, president 

DES PLAINES— Gregg Hannahs (390 Bellaire), second vlv.s president 

EFFINGHAM— Nancy Buenker, recording secretary 

WEST FRANKFORT— Pat Feeley, corresponding secretary 

Father Cletus Hentschel, director; Mrs. Elizabeth Meehan, assistant professor, 
University School, faculty sponsor. 

BAPTIST STUDEI1T UNION 

BENTON— Gladys Davis, Missions ce-chairman 

CARBONDALE— Sandra Crenshaw, president; Judy Harbison, chapel co-chairman; 

Ann Clifton, internationals chairman; Jean Lobenstein, Inter-faith 

Council representative 
CREAL SPRINGS— Mary Hartwell, co-secretary 
CROSSVILLE— Joe Spicer, chapel co-chairman 

EAST ALTON— Eleanor Harper, church representative, Lantana (216 Tomlinson) 
EAST ST. LOUIS— Carolyn Onstott (2003 N. 21st St.), reporter 
ELDORADO— Charles Hammond, publicity co-chairman 
ELLIS GROVE — Lynn Montory, co-secretary 
FAIRFIELD— Mary Jo Brock, devotional chairman 
GODFREY— Terry Peterson, church representative, Walnut 

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HINSDALE— Tom Amyette (6405 Thurlow Couri), Inter-faith Council representative 

INGRAHAM— Donney Dillman, girls enlistment chairman 

J0NESB0R0— Margie Vines, publicity co-chairman 

MARION— Ed Handkins, Mission co-chairman; Nolan Carlisle, church representative, UBC 

MT, VERNON— Marshall High smith, vice president 

OMAHA— Jerry Mbye, boys enlistment chairman 

PEORIA— Faye Andrews (1109 Windom), social co-chairman; Gary Grigg (12 12 E. Wilson), 

Music and Chapel Singers chairman 
SESSER— LaDonna Galloway— YWA chairman 
SHAWNEETOWN— Louis Vickery, stewardship chairman 
VIENNA— Yvonne Stevens, "Beacon" (newspaper) editor 
WASHINGTON— Jerry Boughan, social co-chairman 

Rev. Bert I. Cherry, pastor advisor; Miss Lucille Steele, director; 
Dr. E.H. Hadley, professor of chemistry, faculty advisor. 

STUDENT CHRISTIAN FOUNDATION 

ALTON— Julie Whiteside, program commissioner on student cabinet 
CARBONDALE— Rodney Brod, outreach commissioner on student cabinet; 

Bettina Crawshaw, secretary 
HENRY— Ruth Ann Akright, treasurer 

MADISON— Mary Ann Staikoff , Inter-faith Council representative 
MARION— Kenneth Gravatt, vice president 

NASHVILLE— Geraldine Groennert, Inter-faith Council representative 
URBANA— Richard Fears, (602 W. Clifornia), president 

Rev. Malcolm E. Gillespie, campus minister; Laverne R. Joseph, assistant 
minister; a large number of faculty members serve on the SCF board. 

EASTERN ORTHODOX Club 

JOLIET— Jack Lambakis (714 Western Ave.), vice president 

MADISON— Elaine Tanase, secretary 

NEW YORK CITY, N.Y.— Rizos Katsanas (417 W. 47th St.), president 

A.J. Pappelis, assistant professor of botany, and James BeMiller, assistant 
professor of chemistry, faculty advisers. 

CHANNING C1UB (Unitarian-Universalist) 

CARBONDALE— Sarah Moore, social chairman; Betty Lorger, secretary-treasurer 
RIVERSIDE— Laddie Broz (91 Groveland), president 

Burton Levy, lecturer in philosophy, faculty adviser. 



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Prom Bill Lyons 12-7-62 

SOUTHERH ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Garbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Scale modesl of 153 "mathematical principles" 
designed as structural concepts by R, Buckminster Fuller, designing engineer 
extraordinary, have been acquired by the Southern Illinois University Morris 
Library. 

The models— of wood, steel, wire, paper or plastic— range from toy-size simple 
units of Fuller's unique geometric figures to 30-inch double-layered spheres 
composed of open triangles illustrating his theory of "tensegrity," a word built 
from tension and integrity. 

All of the models are the work of one man, Charles B. Ryan, associate 
professor of fine arts at the University of Oregon, and have been constructed with 
delicate skill of the highest order, according to Fuller, research professor of 
design at SIU. 

The collection was acquired for the library by the SIU Foundation and the 
University Office of Research and Projects. The collection has been appraised at 
$2,500. 

These models round out a complete Fuller Collection presented to the Morris 
Library in recent years, including the designer's personal correspondence and privat* 
papers, manuscripts of some 50 articles and books, a complete set of his drawings 
of research designs, thousands of photographs, and more than a dozen large 
scrapbooks of news and feature articles published about his work. 

Fuller has been developing advanced structural designs since 1917, when he was 
a Navy ensign during World War I. To express the revolutionary aspects of his 
designs, he has coined such words as "tensegrity," "energetic-synergetic geometry," 
and "geodesic dome." 

The geodesic dome, developed to provide a structure of any magnitude without 
impeding vertical supports, he created by forming a framework composed of 
interlocking geometric "space lattices" or cells. -more- 






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The dome concept has been used in more than 2,000 structures built throughout 
the world, the best known being these used by the United States to house its 
display at the 1959 American National Ejchibition in Moscow; the Arctic "radomes" 
along the U.S. -Canadian DEW Line; the world's largest stadium now under construction 
in Tokyo, Japan; the Ford Rotunda Building in Dearborn, which was recently 
destroyed by fire; the Climatron in St, Louis; and the Union Tank Car Company 
dome at Wood River; the last a structure with 304-foot clear-span diameter. 

Rayn, whose artistry has given Fuller's drawings visual vitality and power, 
is a phonomenal model-maker and teacher, Fuller said. "He built his own home, 
is an expert fisherman and wild life enthusiast, a skilled rapids-shooter in boats 
built by his own hands, and is distinguished for his exceptionally fine sense of 
planning and strategy in whatever he undertakes." 



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Eight of 32 new initiates of Southern Illinois University's chapter of 

Phi Kappa Phi, scholastic honor society, shown here are, from left; standing: 

Kenneth Duft and Larry Diesen; Highland; Dayton Thomas, Virden; John Nichum, 

Stewartville, Minn.; James Adams, Dieterich; seated: Herbert Hertenstein, 

New Baden; Rosemary McClain, Rosamond; and Joseph Marvel, Newark, Delaware. 

PHOTO BY INFORMATION SERVICE 12-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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Four of 32 new initiates of Southern Illinois University's chapter of 

Phi Kappa Phi, scholastic honor society, discuss their honors. They are, from 

left: Elvin Hediger, Tamms; Ronnie Hickey, Marion; Patricia Hairdy, Waterloo; 

and Mary McMahan, Tunnel Hill. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 12 - 7 •> 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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Four of 32 new initiates of Southern Illinois University's chapter of 

Phi Kappa Phi, scholastic honor society, discuss their honors. They are, from 

left: Elvin Hediger, Tamms; Ronnie Hickey, Marion; Patricia Hardy, Waterloo; 

and Mary McMahan, Tunnel Hill, 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 12-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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R, Buckminster Fuller, (right), design engineer, explains his "tensegrity" 

principle of construction to Southern Illinois University officials Kenneth R. Millei 

executive director, SIU Foundation, Webster Ballance, assistant coordinator of 

Research and Projects, and Ralph E. McCoy, director of libraries (shown left to 

right). The model is one of a collection of 153 illustrating Fuller's mathematical 

formulas acquired by the SIU library. The models were all built by Charles B. Ryan, 

associate professor of fine arts at the University of Oregon. Fuller is now 

research professor of design at SIU. 

PHOTO BY KIOTO SERVICE 12-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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From Bill Lyons 12-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



EDITORS: Note local names 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. -- Among 32 Southern Illinois University students newly 

initiated into Phi Kappa Phi, scholastic honor society at SIU, is (are) 

of . 

The SIU chapter was organized in 1956. Its primary objectives are to 
recognize and encourage superior scholarship in all fields of study. Twenty-four 
of the initiates are undergraduate students, the rest, graduate students. 

Thomas H. Eliot, newly installed chancellor of Washington University, 
St. Louis, discussed "Progress in Higher Education" during an 8 p.m. public lecture 
Nov. 30 following the initiation ceremonies and dinner in the University Center, 
Prof. Herman M. Haag of the SIU agricultural industries department is president 
of the chapter. 

The initiates, by towns, are: 

BECKEMEYER: Larry Edward Wuebbels. 

CARLYLE: Mary Caroline Scott. 

CARBONDALE: Stefan D. Haag, Eva Mae Murphy (undergraduates), Harry Denzel 

and Alex J. Johnson (graduate students). 
CENTRALIA: Charlotte JoAnn Johnnie, Gary Douglas Jones &sA 

James Sylvester Younker, Jr. 
CHICAGO: Karen Eve Gilso. 
CHRISTOPHER: Carolyn Joyce Jurick. 
DIETERICH: James Ernest Adams. 

HIGHLAND: Larry Ramon Diesen and Kenneth Delmar Duft. 
HONG KONG, CHINA: Hilary K.L. Hsu. 
LIBERTYVILLE: Ann Alberta Cullen 
MACOMB: Harry Seymour, Jr. (graduate student). 
MARION: Ronnie Eudean Hickey. 

NEWARK, DELAWARE: Joseph Beebe Marvel (graduate student). 
NEW BADEN: Herbert G. Hertenstein (graduate student). 
ODIN: Berthel Howard Wooters, III. 
OKAWVLLLE: Mary ami Maxeiner. 
ROSAMOND: Rosemary Eileen McClain. 

STEWARTVILLE , MINN.: John Gerald Nichum (graduate student). 
TAMMS: Elvin Dean Hediger. 
TUNNEL HILL: Mary Evelyn McMahan. 

TEHRAN, IRAN: Yousef Danesh-Khoshboo (graduate student), 
VIRDEN: Dayton L. Thomas. 
WATERLOO: Patricia Ardine Hardy. 

WEST FRANKFORT: William Dale Palmer (graduate student). 
WILLOW SPRINGS: Patricia Ann Horrall. 
ZEIGLER: Mary Jane Hiller. -am- 



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From Bill Lyons 12-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — A light raincoat, a birth certificate and 
approximately $450 — those are some of the requirements for attending Southern 
Illinois University's annual travel-study course in Mexico next summer. 

To be offered by SIU's Latin American Institute at the University of 
Guanajuato, in the mountains of central Mexico, the two-month sojourn will offer 
college students, 1963 high school graduates or qualified adults 12 hours of 
credit for studies in Spanish language, literature and history at one of Mexico's 
oldest universities. 

The estimated basic cost will cover tuition fees at Guanajuato, round trip 
transportation from Carbondale, lodging to and from the U.S. and Mexico and 
room and board for six weeks while in residence. Two and one-half weeks before 
registration the 18 students accepted for the course will tour a number of Mexican 
cities including Monterrey, Cuernavaca and Mexico City. 

Course announcements from the Latin American Institute list a light raincoat as 
a necessity at the mile-high campus, although summer rains in the mild climate are 
of "short duration," Birth certificates are required, along with a tourist card or 
passport visa. 

Basil Hedrick, assistant director of the Institute, will direct the course, 
accompanying the group with his wife. He said some $80 tuition scholarships are 
available in applicants who must have an adequate knowledge of the Spanish language 
and submit two references along with a 500-word biographical sketch giving reasons 
for wanting to take the course. 

SIU has offered travel-study courses in Mexico for the past seven years. The 
group will leave the SIU campus June 15 and will return Aug. 13. 



-pb- 



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From Bill Lyons 12-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — The University Press of Southern Illinois 
University will display its books and hold a reception for George Winchester Stone 
during the annual convention of the Modern Language Association of America in 
Washington, D.C., Dec. 27-29. 

Vernon Sternberg, director, said John Erie Grinnell, vice president in 
charge of operations on the Carbondale campus, and Walter Kent, also of the 
University Press, would accompany him to the convention. 

The Press, will hold a reception Dec. 27 in honor of Stone, editor of the 
London Stage series of books it has published. December 27 is the publication 
date for Part IV of the London Stage series, Sternberg said. 

Grinnell, a native of North Dakota and an alumnus of the University of 
North Dakota, will preside at the reception. 



-Ik- 



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From Bill Lyons 12-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



H.W. Miller, Southern Illinois University swine-production specialist, has 
been named by the U.S. Livestock Coaches' Association as its representative in 
planning livestock judging contest phases of the International Livestock and 
Dairy Exposition. 

Miller will serve a three-year term as a director of the Association, which 
represents faculty coaches of collegiate livestock judging teams. He joined the 
SIU agriculture staff in 1961 after three years on the University of Tennessee 
staff. 



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From Bill Lyons 12-7-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

ATTENTION: Women's Page Editors 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Color, desirable eye appeal in all meals, becomes a 
"must 15 for the Christmas dinner. 

School lunchrooms, hospitals and public food service establishments of any 
size should give especial care to make the Yule-time menu a colorful one, according 
to Henrietta Becker, food specialist at Southern Illinois University. 

She ought to know, for before coming to SIU's School of Home Economics last 
year she headed the dietary department of Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, and worked 
frequently in an advisory capacity with school lunch training programs of Missouri 
and Illinois. 

"Use lots of red and green garnishes on individual trays for the hospital 
patient, around the various containers on steam or refrigerated tables in the school 
lunchroom or the cafeteria, on the individual plate at the restaurant," she suggests. 

Pimiento strips, red and green pepper rings, a spoonful of cranberry sauce, 
parsley sprigs, radish roses, candied cherries, cinnamon drops, red apple slices, 
Keifer pears, crabapples— any of these will add a festive touch of color. 

Accompaniments to the Christmas bird, whether turkey, duck, goose, pheasant, 
capon or chicken, should be chosen to accent the holiday color scheme, she says. 

She offers the following color hints: 

Salads : Holded cherry nut; cranberry gelatin; beet-and-cabbage; asparagus with 
tinted Hollandaise sauce; marinated green beans with pimiento strips; mixed raw 
vegetables in tomato aspic; tomato stuffed with cottage cheese and chives; cole slaw 
of both red and white cabbage; stuffed celery. 

Vegetables : Beets with orange sauce; rhubarb; scalloped tomatoes; scalloped 

corn liberally laced with pimientos and diced green peppers; green beans (cut, uncut, 

French style)— buttered, with ham flavoring, with sour cream and slivered almonds, 

or baked in cream sauce; green peas, asparagus, spinach plain or scalloped, 

-more- 



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brussel sprouts, parsleyed potatoes, lima beans, turnip greens, succotash, 
Swiss chard, collards, kale, kohlrabi, olcra, artichokes. 

Desserts : Lime or raspberry sherbet; strawberry shortcake topped with whipped 
cream or whipped cream substitute and dotted with a green maraschino cherry; lime 
and raspberry gelatin, cut in tiny cubes, piled in sherbet glasses and topped 
with ice cream or whipped cream; small squares of your favorite cake, iced with white 
frosting and centered with a sprig of holly and a tiny red candle. 

More Desserts ; Fruit salad, using mixed fruits plus green maraschino cherries 
and unpeeled apple chunks; baked custard sprinkled with colored Christmas crystals; 
bread pudding topped with cherry sauce; sour cream ambrosia made with red and green 
tinted cocoanut; rainbow cake; cookies in the shape of angels, stars, trees, 
Santa Clauses, reindeer, bells or sleighs and decorated with colored Christmas 
candies. 

If the table appointments include accents of gold, let the menu also feature 
golden corn, golden rutabaga, sweet potatoes, yellow squash, golden carrot "coins"; 
cheese, cheese sauce, sliced or grated hardboiled egg topping; apricots, oranges, 
tangerines, tangelos, mandarin oranges, pineapple, orange gelatin or orange 
marmelade. 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - G - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453 - 2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — A capital funds budget request for $34,400,000 was 
approved and forwarded to state officials by the Southern Illinois University board 
of trustees today. It deals primarily with the second stage of planned construction 
at the Edwardsville campus. The budget is for the 1963-65 biennium. 

In presenting the budget figures to the board President Delyte IJ. Morris called 
attention to enrollment projections for the new campus at Edwardsville, where $25 roil.', 
million from the State Universities Bond Issue has been allocated for buildings 
designed to accomodate 5,000 students. This construction, termed the "first phase" 
at the Edwardsville campus, is scheduled for completion in 1964. 

"However," Dr. Morris told the board, "enrollment projections in this densely 
populated region of Illinois indicate that by the fall of 1965 there will be an 
additional 5,190 students seeking admission. Because of this, we think it necessary 
to request funds to start the second phase of construction." 

Capital improvements at the Carbondale campus, meanwhile, were requested for the 
biennium in the form of one new building--Physical Science--and a power plant additic. 
which would total an estimated $4,900,000. The sums of $1 million for land 
acquisition, $1.5 million for renovation of existing facilities, a half million each 
for planning and public improvements and $1 million for funds to match outside grants 
brought the total request for the Carbondale campus to $9,400,000. 

Capital improvements planned for the Edwardsville campus would include seven new 
buildings at a total estimated cost of $18,100,000; a half million for land acquisiti- 
acquisition, $3. 5 million for land development to include utilities, $1 million for 
planning funds and $1% million to match outside grants. 

New buildings planned for the second phase of construction at Edwardsville would 
include Science and Technology, general classroom, utilities plant, specialized 
classroom, physical training and education, service, and communications. 

-30- 



Wo. 455 December 8, 1962 

S. I. E. A. NEW SLITTER 

DAVE KRAMER of the Kramer triumvirate (3 papers and 3 executives—not to be confused 
with tbe Greenville triumvirate of 3 executives and a single paper) writes: "Thanks 
for the mention in the recent News litter, but you and I know two different Bill 
Mitzes. The coach we have is just about three years out of college, not 'somewhere 
in his 70's' as you report.,. ,(We did not mean, Dave, that the Bill Mitze we did not 
know was in his 70's; it's the father of the Bill Mitze we did not know who is still 
'coon and quail hunting in his 70's, We are convinced, however, that your Mitze is 
another one we do not know,) 

"Our Bill Mitze did quite well in his first year as head football coach here, 
and in a town that likes its football as well as Gibson City does, that's about all 
you can expect, 

"INCIDENTALLY * this young man came from Warsaw, where we Kramers lived for quite 
a spell. We touched off a minor migration when we moved out away from the river 
onto the plains, and there's a pretty good colony of ex- Wars awi tee here, 

"I just thought I should call this error to your attention because you are 
seldom wrong, according to the News litter, (How true,) and events so rare should be 
properly noted, 

"While we're admittedly on the fringe of Little Egypt we enjoy your publication, 
a word that should be surrounded by quotation marks. It's interesting, and has the 
names of people we know and like, so it's just as much a community paper as ours is. 
But • , .mimeograph I 

"On your next tour around the area, swing a little north and come see us." (Not 
a word about poor Don, who was shot in the foot!,, Dave,, do you really think that any 
self-respecting typographer would print the tossed-salad type of copy in which the 
Newsl, abounds? •••Came through your city one Saturday about dark, but the mint was 
padlocked. No doubt you work a short week,) 

CURT SMALL . HARRIS BURG DAILY REGISTER, writes: "Perhaps you read the Saturday Review. 
I do between times, the 'times' being this and that, A most lucid explanation. Saw 
the PR reference and thought of you. The prayer is a honey ...Here is the reference: 

"First honors for PR work at tbe convention* --went to none of the speakers but 
instead to a young priest who delivered the invocation at the opening-day luncheon. 
This invocation, by Father John J, Hever, of St, Joseph's Church, Belmont, 
Massachusetts, was, as far as we were concerned, the speech of the month: "Almighty 
God, our Father and our friend, we know that your memory of earthly banquet halls is 
pretty grim, ever since the first Christmas eve when an insolent fellow in a greasy 
apron at the only hotel in town slammed the door right in your mother's pleading 
face, 

"Well, the mills of God grind slowly, but they grind exceedingly fine, and here 
we are today, twenty centuries later, on a continent that the innkeeper never knew 
existed, speaking a language he never heard, and our very first thought before we sit 
down to our banquet tables is to stand in reverence and salute your undying name, 

"WE ARE especially happy to make this prayer, Lord, and we hope you are to 
hear it because this time we are not in church and not in trouble. As a rule when 
we speak to you, we are either kneeling against the background of a stained-glass 
window, or buckling on a life preserver. It is either the routine of religion or the 
rush call for help. But today it is gloriously different. Today we want you to bless 
our joy as we stand poised for a few hours of genial festivity. Bless us then, 
Lord, and in thy goodness, grant that the food may be well flavored, the service 
smooth, and— if it isn't asking too much— the speeches short..." 

Compiled by Information Service, Southern Illinois University, for the Southern 
Illinois Editorial Association, the News litter is made possible because of the extent 
to which area editors include Information Service on their mailing lists, (more) 



Page 2 

LEON CHURCH . LEBANON ADVERTISER, writes: "I am in need of one of those shoocin' 
sticks for my collection of 'old' things including me. Does anyone have a spare one? 
Glad to hear of Elaine Sheperd's latest. I registered her when she came to McKendree. 
No doubt the book is an interesting one— she was, and probably still is. See you at 
Augustine's Jan. 19, I hope. "... (Signed with a church.). ..In case you've wondered, 
newspapers have been available in Lebanon since January 18, 1848. The ADVERTISER is 
the successor to the ILLINOIS ADVOCATE, ILLINOIS SONS OF TEMPERANCE, LEBANON GEM, 
LEBANON COURIER, LEBANON JOURNAL, LEBANON LEADER, and LEBANON REVELLE. 

PITY THE POOR publisher who permits himself to promise printing to be processed 
promptly during the hunting season, for his desires will be thwarted, his days made 
sorrowful, and be may speak sharply to his wife though she be innocent of any 
transgressions above and beyond her normal and rightful quota. 

AS WE ROARED through Ramsey in a rocket Friday night, a faint glimmer shone through 
the bay window of the NEWS- JOURNAL shop... Backing half the length of the city to 
investigate, we found SIEA ex-pres. Bob Mueller deeply imbedded in a cloud of talcum 
powder. As the dust cleared and we settled down to thoroughly interrupting the work 
process, it became apparent that Robert was dutifully turning out thousands of tax 
forms promised for delivery at sunrise Monday. . ."Where's Julius?" we asked, knowing 
full well that the senior Mueller was home practicing on the sliphorn.... "He went 
pheasant hunting," Bob lied, "and left me with this workV...So we twisted Bob's arm 
two more turns and learned that friends had invited him to accompany them northward 
Saturday to slay the wily pheasant. • .Had bis sense of values not changed in the last 
30 years, he would have let the work wait while he went after meat. 

ANOTHER SAD case was turned up Saturday while we were engaged in field research, 
accompanied by "Cap" Frazer, consultant... In a vague sort of way we were heading 
toward Marlssa with the hope that some rural friend of 100 years ago would allow us 
to hunt quail, most counties being closed for such during the week- long deer season. 
(We had long since given up dear hunting.) .. .As we steered through Steeleville, habit 
and fate prevailed, and we stopped at the LEDGER mint merely to ask the publisher not 
about his business but how he had fared with the birds. •• "I can't go," said "Huts" 
Webster, getting to the point and pointing to a stack of job work— much in the manner 
of Mueller. "But wait," said he. "I'll call the boy.". ..He stepped out the door, 
waved an arm, yelled, "Hunters"— and "Bud" Webster appeared out of nowhere... Now 
"Bud" definitely is not a boy. He is a farmer who raises livestock, works at the 
LEDGER shop during the day and at the Webster movie house (400 lights in the marquee) 
at night and hunts quail while resting. • .In addition to a radio, heater and 
directional signals, his car is equipped with a shotgun and shells. So we were on 
our way in no time and into some of the prettiest bird country ever. And every time 
"Bud" said, "There'll be a covey over here," there was... Unfortunately, with the 
temperature at 69 that afternoon, the dogs were of little help, and two of the guns, 
we discovered, had curved barrels. Not mentioning any names, but Bud did not fire a 
Shot. . .It was a wonderful afternoon nonetheless. Maybe there'll be another day there, 
after a rain, and with the temperature 30 degrees lower, and with "Huts" willing to 
leave the work to the women— who hardly ever take a day off, the exception being 
Dec. 8, when Ruby McClure planned to attend the writer's workshop at S.I.U... 
Plastered on a restaurant wall: "Nothing is opened by mistake more often than the 
mouth," and, "I don't know where I'd be without you, but it's fun thinking about it." 

WE WERE privileged to string along as a guest last week when our No. 1 boss addressed 
the less- than- a-y ear-old East Central Illinois Press Club and Chowder Society, whose 
membership is drawn from Danville to Bloomington and Decatur but is largely 
concentrated In Champaign-Urbana...It was good to meet again such notables as Pres. 
Frank Schooley, U. of I. radioman famous for his bass voice and blunt word, who 
kindly allowed us to crash the party... And Bob Sink, the cynic, lord of the editorial 
side of the URBANA EVENING COURIER, whose heir apparent is up to his ears in musical 
activities at SIU... Never having heard Sink the elder break forth into song, even in 
the days of nearly an all-girl reporting staff, we presume young Bob acquired musical 
leanings from his mother. -more- 



Page 3 

THE ART STRANGS of IPA fame, Grover-The-Rover Shiptons, the Art Wildhagens, Ted 
Peterson, Chuck Flynn, Dapper Dan Brown, Jolly Joe Sutton, Henry Lippold and Bill 
Roberts were among other U. of I. notables in attendance, plus Judy Osborne of the 
COURIER and Fran Meyer and Joe Black of the NEWS-GAZETTE... Representing the out-of- 
town membership was Bob Butler, owner of a weekly "chain" printed at St. Joseph... 
Many others we did not know or meet. 

AT A NORTHERN Illinois Press Association meeting Friday at Northern 111. U., DeKalb, 
we found Jack Holmes, IPA pres. from Villa Grove, Art Strang, the U. of I. Bob 
Evanses and nigh onto 50 others... Ken Smith of Rochelle heads the northern group 
which Don Grubb, chairman of the University's journalism department and formerly at 
SIU, helped organize within the past year or so... Tom Ray of Rockford explained their 
rather new "bonus system" for paying stringers— not according to the length of story 
but according to the page on which it is carried. Thus a good three graph item on 
page one might be worth much more than some personals on page 17... Lowell Nye of the 
HARVARD HERALD brought up the old question of good taste... To Id of the favorable 
reaction he had engendered when he omitted details of a violent suicide— because he 
didn't learn of the details until later... Another thought expressed by a weekly 
panelist was that he used pix for reasons of typography and readership and not 
primarily for support of news stories... Never did get to "Southern Illinois Day" in 
Chicago but heard good reports of same... It is a long way from DeKalb to Carbondale 
at night. 

THE ROCKFORD paper holds an annual dinner and workshop for stringers at which is 
stressed the greatness of the paper, the necessity for following certain forms in 
preparation of copy (a handbook is provided for stringers and publicity chairmen), 
and the relative values of stories. . .The latter may have been added at the time a 
"beautiful obit" was carried— and three days later the m.e. learned that the man had 
been shot I.. .Banquet speaker was Frank Spencer, UPI Midwest Division bureau chief. 

A NOTE from Joyce Rickards of the Hollister Publications poses a new request- -for the 
"marital status" of women students mentioned in a story... Ernie Heltsley, who will 
complete his journalism work here this term, as mentioned previously in this here 
publication, will go to work for Oldham Paisley, MARION DAILY REPUBLICAN, about two 
hours after his last exam. Ernie reported numerous responses to his ads. 

THE EVENING JOURNAL . East St. Louis, carried a bright and enlightening pix page on 
election coverage, winding up with a shot of a carrier boy delivering a copy to a 
subscriber (naturally). Brightening the page were the charming likenesses of such 
notables as Rube Yelvington, news ed.; Ed Belz, city ed.; Charlie Stewart, assistant 
pity ed.; Curt Mathews, desk assistant, and reporters Gene Hogan, Joe Wilson, Bob 
Wright and Marion Bartosiak. 

THE EDWARDSVILLE INTELLIGENCER is seeking its oldest subscriber. A candidate for the 
honor is 33, remembers when Charles Boeschenstein was publisher (1383-1915) .. Jack 
Boyd, PADUCAH SUN- DEMOCRAT, says the real test of community support and inter ur; in 
music is the number of persons who would go to hear a "name" musician BEFORE lie 
becomes a "name." 

THE BONDS of Dongola were "panning gold" two weeks ago while visiting their daughter 
Carol and her family in Georgia— and the abandoned gold mine about 75 miles from 
Atlanta. The old tunnels are still there, and Carol's two boys, as well as grand- 
parents, had a "real good time," probably because the gold mine in Georgia reminded 
them of the mint in Dongola... Incident ally, did you know that their daughter Jo Anne 
and her husband had adopted their second Korean orphan? •• .Karen Wessels, EVANSVILLE 
COURIER PRESS, was dispossessed by a pre- Thanks giving fire, saving only her children, 
self, heirloom ring and a couple of plaster statues. Friends chipped in to recoup 
her material possessions, and she wrote a good column on her "Thanksgiving"... Al 
Hodgson, WAVERLY JOURNAL: "Wonder if it's just a coincidence that Thanksgiving this 
year fell during National Indigestion Week?" -more- 



Page 4 

IN CASE you missed it but would like to be reminded, Robert U. Brown observes in 
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER: "Instead of being a source of criticism for various failings, 
some real and some alleged, newspapers should be a source of wonder, awe and amazement 
that the news can be gathered and can be written, edited, printed and distributed 
with such speed each day, that there are so few errors factually and typographically, 
and that the vast majority of them are as good as they are under the pressures of 
time, mechanical restrictions and the economics of trying to remain financially 
solvent • " 

A NEW c itv directory has been printed in the shop of the WAYNE COUNTY PRESS... In the 
DUPO HERALD TRIBUNE the famous Fischers carry a column written by the administrator 
of Centerville Township Hospital... Clyde Cole and mate, GREENFIELD ARGUS, recently 
took their first vacation in 17 years while their son Bill and Curtis Coonrod kept 
the store. Where the Coles went we know not. 

W.L. SCHMITT f MACOUPIN COUNTY INQUIRER: "It's wonderful to have a good encyclopedia 
around the house; it has so many things in it that you don't want to know. .,1 phrase 
the letter in my mind, (It's going to be the witty kind.) It later takes the same old 
rut, (I meant to answer sooner, but— )...An acquaintance described the campaign by 
quoting a remark made by Mark Twain: "Get your facts first, and then distort them 
as much as you please. "•••When children ask awkward questions, invention is the 
necessity of mot her •"••.The HENRY-NEWS REPUBLICAN recently lost a newstand when 
Tuttles' grocery store burned down. Readers can still get their paper while shopping, 
however. The new outlet is Murphy's market. Copies are delivered to the store 
fresher than milk and contain plenty of meaty items, 

SPARTA NEWS-PLAINDEALER : "There's always something of interest in the Plaindealer's 
classified ads. This week, a Sparta gentleman wants to find his upper dentures, 
which slipped out of his shirt pocket, where he was in the habit of carrying them 
when not in use. "••.(Obviously J). ••Head in BROOKPQRT INDEPENDENT: "Mrs. Brown and 
Mrs. Black Honored by Royal (Purple?) Neighbors." 

GROVER SHIPTON . in case you wish to send a Christmas card, has homes teaded in Champaigi 
at 1803% Lynnwood Drive, probably in the high rent district... Despite the fact that 
the Shiptons have moved out, the Roodhouse National Bank still has deposits 
approaching $2,900,000. 

A DISCUSSION of exaggerated claims in today's advertising sent Bill Schmitt of the 
MACOUPIN COUNTY ENQUIRER to the files to check out ads of yesteryear. Among his 
findings in his "Chasing Headlines Column" were these: "While today's hypochondriacs 
have a multitude of scientifically- named pills, potions and tranquilizers to choose 
from, Grandma could cure anything with one swig from her patent medicine bottle. The 
medicine ads were the bread and butter of 19th century newspapers and magazines ."... 
"A lady who wanted to be daring in 1875 could purchase for a dollar a bottle of 
'unrivalled Circassin Hair Dye for changing light, red or grey hair to a beautiful 
brown or black"... "Where the people in modern ads are zestful and brimming over with 
breakfast cereal pep, the men and women in the old-time ads were pictured as placid 
and serene in pre- atomic certitude. The children were angelic and well-behaved, 
their cupid's-bow mouths pursed in tight little smiles. It was a world untroubled 
by nagging anxieties over whether to use cream, stick or spray deodorant." 

DICK FINFGELD . HENRY NEWS REPUBLICAN, gave notice of a subscription hike effective 
November 1. One year in Marshall and Putnam counties will be $5 and outside of those 
counties will be $6 ....The NEWS-REPUBLICAN also carries a photo of the Henry welcome 
sign recently spruced up by the Jaycees. It calls Henry, "Best Town in Illinois by 
a Dam Site"— which ve may have used before... This page is composed entirely of 
"overset," and we note with some concern— but not much— that we have mentioned two 
papers twice, which is unforgivable in any issue, much less in one page... Should we 
tear up the page and "make it over"?... Are you kidding? 

-more- 



Page 5 

PESCADOR. NEW ATHENS JOURNAL-PRESS: "In some publication or other there was an 
article by a woman who said something to the effect that she wished women would 
start dressing to please men again. • .Although I think women are here to stay and I 
find myself liking the idea somewhat, there is merit to this charge. Especially when 
the writer added, in effect: 'Someone in the fashion world presses a button, and all 
the women suddenly begin wearing purple. By the time all have bought purple outfits 
and accessories, the button is pressed again, and purple is "out". Unless you want 
to look like last year, you now have to wear something in pink. And so it goes from 
color to color from "look", to "look", and from season to season 1 ...Mrs. Foster Short 
is the Marissa area's contribution to Fischer Publications as a linotype operator. •• 
Another weekly newspaper editor reports that he saw this display card advertising 
auto seat belts: 'Have a couple of belts for the road.' •••Remember the woman who 
complained about dishpan hands? She now suffers from push-button fingers •••The girl 
secretary said the efficiency expert had had his eye on her all day, and that she 
didn't know whether to act busy or interested." 

CHARLIE JONES . GIRARD GAZETTE: "It's always disheartening to make a mistake, but 
remember that a mistake is a sign one is trying to do something. ••Automation—Man's 
effort to make work so easy that women can do it all. "•••Irene Purcell, MT. VERNON 
REGISTER- NEWS: "Women were made before mirrors— and they have stayed there ever since. 

DAVE SAUNDERS . CARTERVILLE HERALD: ..."We would like to think that the people of 
Carterville think enough of their hometown paper to bring their news to the Herald 
first, instead of waiting until it is published in another paper. ..Because if you 
want the report of your wedding or some other social activity published correctly, 
the place to bring it is to a newspaper that cares about you— The Herald ," 

ART SCHULZ . PALESTINE REGISTER: "'Isn't it a Glorious Feeling to be among people you 
know and trust! ' That's what the lady said when she returned to Palestine from a 
city shopping trip where she encountered the hustle and bustle and 'Don't Care' 
attitude of city clerks. "...Bill Boyne, EVENING JOURNAL, East St. Louis: "One reason 
why the li.D. shoots ducks with such enthusiasm is that his feathered targets cry 
'Quack-Quack]'" 

PAUL COUSLEY . ALTON EVENING TELEGRAPH: "While protecting its neighbors in the 
matter, the Alton Brick Co. is acting the part of good citizen in insisting on good 
housekeeping on the area it plans to let the city use for sanitary landfill. 

"It has established some qualifications for the city's use of the site which 
should quiet any fears of neighbors. And the city's acceptance of and adherence to 
these conditions should demonstrate to other communities that completely 
unobjectionable disposal methods can be worked out. 

"Through such methods it should be possible to convince other communities 
experiencing difficulty obtaining such sites that satisfactory disposal methods can 
be followed. 

"The public of many communities, instead of only one, may owe a debt to Alton 
Brick as the demonstration goes on." 

THE DALKERTS . WATERLOO TIMES, report that the city has contracted for construction 
of a municipal natural gas system... Rodney Brenner, GOLCONDA ENTERPRISE, and other 
citizens staged the community's first annual deer festival on the Saturday following 
the opening of the season. The program for an expected influx of 4,000 hunters 
included a parade and barbecued venison, cooked on the courthouse lawn. ..Paul 
Rexroat, CHAMPAIGN-URBANA COURIER, had good pix and copy on the opening day of the 
hunting season. A recent COURIER feature on Crab Orchard hunting was by Royal 
McClelland, executive director of the Illinois Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs,... 
Bob Voris, WATERLOO REPUBLICAN, carries a report of a dispute which has left the 
city without an electrical service crew for several weeks. We are in no position to 
comment, of course, but we were impressed by the quality of writing in a letter-to- 
the-editor from the business manager of the union. Some newspaper should hire that 
fellow. He writes better than many reporters. 

-30- 



From Bill Lyons 12 - C - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

siu mas SUMMARY 
FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION 

The National Science Foundation has awarded grants totaling more than 123- 

thousand dollars to Southern Illinois University to conduct summer institutes for 

high school biology and mathematics teachers. It is the sixth consecutive year that 

the N-S-F has selected Southern as one of the nationtri.de campus centers for programs 

aimed at giving teachers updated courses in the subjects they teach. 

* * * 

Erection of 32 large beams forming the roof of a 3-hundred-foot diameter dome 
will be the next step in construction of S-I-U's new 4-million 2-hundred thousand 
dollar physical education-military training building. The steel outer ring of the 
new edifice has gone up at the south edge of the campus. Scheduled completion date 
is January, 1964. 

* * * 

Holiday drinking is causing an increasing number of fatal traffic accidents. 
That's the warning from James E. Aaron, coordinator of Southern Illinois University's 
Safety Center. Aaron admonishes that more than half of the drivers in fatal accidents 
have been drinking and says drivers should realize just a couple of social drinks 
will impair their driving ability and increase risks. Aaron also said persons 
whose holiday plans include driving on Christmas Eve should use extra caution. From 
5 p.m. to midnight December 24 are among the most dangerous times in the holidays 
for motorists. He cautions drivers to start trips early, slow down at night and 
in bad weather, obey the speed laws, and recognize their moral responsibility to be 
good drivers. 



* 



A light raincoat, a birth certificate and about 4-hundred 50 dollars. Those 
are some of the requirements for attending S-I-U's annual travel-study course in 
Mexico next summer. To be offered by Southern's Latin American Institute at the 
University of Guanajuato in the mountains of central Mexico, the two-month sojourn 
will offer college students, 1963 high school graduates or qualified adults 12 hours 
of credit for studies in Spanish language, literature and history, S-I-U has 
offered travel-study courses in Mexico for the past seven years, 

* * * 

Home sewing is no longer dependent upon economic cycles,,, but has become a 
high fashion function in its own right. Rose Padgett, textiles research scientist 
at Southern Illinois University, notes that in 1960, home sewers in America used 
an estimated 6-hundred 25-million yards of cloth. From 1940 to 1960, home sewing 
machines have increased by 10-million, and sales of home sewing patterns have jumped 
from 60 million to 1-hundred million. How many home sewers are there? 38-million 
5-hundred- thousand, she says. And teenagers are sewing more these days - in 1961, 
in fact, teenage girls spent more than 71-million-dollars on fabrics for home sewing. 



-Ik- 



COMMUNICATIONS BUILDING scheduled for construction at Southern Illinois 
University's Carbondale campus. Plans for the building to house 25 classrooms, 
radio, television and closed circuit TV studios as well as a 575-seat theater for 
student productions, were presented to the board of trustees at their December 
meeting. Bids will be sought in 1963 and completion expected in 1965. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 12-8-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453 - 2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 






. 



■ 



CLASS AND LECTURE ROOMS for 2,700 students will be contained in this 
classroom building group, proposed to the Southern Illinois University board of 
trustees for construction next summer. Featured is a master audio-visual control 
center that can serve as many as 10 assembly locations simultaneously. The building, 
scheduled for completion in 1965, will be financed from Southern's share of 
Universities Bond Issue funds. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 12-3-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453 - 2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



. 






.. 



/ From Bill Lyons 12 - G - 62 

S0UTHEE1T ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBOHDALE, ILL., Dec. •»• Sabbatical leaves for seven Southern Illinois 
University faculty members whose service to Southern totals 120 years were 
approved by the university board of trustees at the December meeting here today. 
They will travel, write and broaden their professional experience. 

In other personnel matters the board added tvo names to the staff at 
Carbondale and one to the Edwardsville campus; made 12 temporary appointments; 
extended eight others and approved two changes in position. 

The traditional leave granted by universities for study and research will be 
utilized next fall by three 30-year SIU veterans to travel in Europe and South 
America. Miss Annamarie Krause, associate professor of geography who joined the 
staff in 1930, will follow up the development of Mennonite colonies in the 
Paraguayan Chaco region. J. Cary Davis, professor of foreign languages who also 
joined the staff in 1930, plans to travel in South America and Spain. Miss 
Madeleine M. Smith, associate professor of foreign languages and a member of the 
SIU faculty since 1929, will travel and study in Europe. 

Claude J. Dykhouse, professor of secondary education and a faculty member 
since 1947, will visit schools in European countries. Carroll L. Riley, associate 
professor in anthropology, plans research in Rome for a book on the origins of 
civilization; Raymond J, Spahn, associate professor in the humanities division 
at Edwardsville, expects to visit U.S. Information Centers in Europe and 
Miss JoAnne Thorpe, instructor in physical education, will study for a doctor's 
degree at Texas Woman's University. 

Arthur E, Oldehoeft will join the SIU staff as research associate in data 

processing, coming here from private industry. Samuel Alexander Patchett Jr., 

was confirmed as supervisor of flight service at the university airport. He is a 

native of Valier. Earl Frederick Ferris was employed as supervisor and landscape 

architect for Edwardsville campus. He held a similar position in the office 
of the St. Louis County Department of Paries and Recreation. -more- 










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A Chicago designer and a Springfield practicing architect have been 
employed to fill temporary vacancies in the SIU design department. Both will 
commute once a week from their offices. James Logan, a technician at the 
Chicago firm of Goldsholl and Associates, V7as appointed visiting prfoessor 
to teach graduate design courses, Richard Jelleg, of SelJeg and Spencer, site 
planners and landscape architects in Springfield, was appointed lecturer to 
teach undergraduate students of Herbert Roan, visual designer now on sabbatical 
leave. 

Given temporary university status were six instructors working under the 
Area Redevelopment Program at Southern's Vocational-Tecnical Institute, 

The resignation of Elmer J, Shirley, supervisor at the University Center, 
was announced. 



-30- 






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3 gfl-j; 



Bill Lyons 12-8-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453 - 2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. 8, —Architects' plans for two new buildings on the 
Carbondale campus were reviewed by the Southern Illinois University board of 
trustees at its December meeting today. Both are scheduled for construction next 
summer, financed with money already allocated from the State Universities Bond 
Issue . 

The buildings are a general classroom group designed to seat more than 
2,700 students and a School of Communications building to feature classroom, 
laboratory and production facilities for journalism, speech, theater, speech 
correction, printing and photography. 

The general classroom group will be on the western edge of the campus and 
will feature four large lecture halls radiating out from a central audio-visual 
projection and closed circuit T.V program control center. The ha.lls, ramped 
like movie theaters, will seat 300 students apiece. 

Also receiving audio-visual fare from the central control room will be six 
smaller conference classrooms designed to seat 80 students each. 

Adjoining the lecture hall complex will be a three-story wing with classrooms 
for 1,000 students and offices for 130 faculty members. 

The new concept in classroom space was designed by the Chicago firm of 
Mittelbusher and Tourtelot. University Architect Charles Pulley told the board 
working plans should be ready to submit for bids in June and the buildings should 
be completed in July, 1965. 

The Communications Building, also to be constructed on the western edge of 

the present campus, will include a 575-seat theater, replacing the present 
Southern Playhouse, as well as 25 classrooms and radio, television and closed 
circuit TV studios. The main part of the building will be two-stories high, with 
an exterior treatment of buffed brick and pre-cast concrete "fins" along the east 
facade. A fly gallery behind the theater stage — for props and equipment — will 
rise 82 feet. 

A projected second stage of construction, when other funds are available, 
would include a 5,000 seat auditorium. 

L. Lattin Smith & Associates of Chicago are the architects for the 
Communications Building. Construction should start next summer with completion 
scheduled in 1965. 

-pb- 






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Bill Lyons 12-3-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois Release: IMMEDIATE 

Phone: 453 - 2276 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec— A budget request for $6,505,306 to 
provide movable equipment for new buildings under construction was 
approved by the Southern Illinois University board of trustees today. 

The equipment would be used in 16 buildings financed from the 
State Universities Bond Issue and scheduled to be completed during 
the biennium at the Carbondale and Edwardsville campuses. The state 
attorney general has ruled the cost of acquiring such movable equipment 
cannot be charged to bond issue funds. 

The board of trustees, John Page Wham of Centralia chairman, 
discussed the budget request at its October meeting but did not take 
formal action until today. Copies of the budget will be forwarded to 
the. State Department of Finance and the new State Board of Higher 
Education. 

-30- 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 10 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — A chartered flight to Europe combined with three 
university courses tailored for presentation there will be offered again this 
summer to students, staff and families of Southern Illinois University. 

Sponsored by SIU's Division of University Extension in cooperation with 
the student activities office, the program is "designed to afford the advantages 
of foreign travel and study," according to Raymond H. Dey, director of summer 
session at the Carbondale campus and flight co-ordinator for all campuses. 

One hundred and three students and faculty members participated in the inaugural 
flight last summer. This year's flight, costing approximately $344, will depart 
St. Louis June 17, debarking in London. The return to St. Louis will be August 26 
from Paris. 

Courses this year, to be taught by SIU instructors, are German language 
in Jungheim; two history courses taught simultaneously in England; and a government 
course at Hamburg University. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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^— ^ 12 - 10 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



Four more galleries have booked "The Scene Design of Mordecai Gorelik, :! a 
retrospective exhibit of stage and film designs prepared by Southern Illinois 
University. 

The show, covering the professional work of Gorelik, former Broadway designer 
who is now research professor at SIU, has been on exhibit the past two months at 
the University of California. 

Ben Watkins, acting curator of the University Galleries, said the exhibit will 
go to the Washington State Museum in Seattle next month. Other locations scheduled 
for the traveling show are Brigham Young University, the University of Alberta, 
Canada, and Antioch (0.) College. 

Containing 200 items, including models and sketches, the show is the first 
of its kind assembled for gallery exhibitions, according to Watkins. 

-pb- 



Robert Odaniell, director of Southern Illinois University's Alumni Service, 
has been chosen to serve as chairman-elect of District V of the American Alumni 
Council, an organization of professional alumni officials. 

District V is comprised of six states, Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Michigan, 
Wisconsin, and Minnesota. 



-Ik- 



. . '■"- 







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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



12 - 10 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — A member of the Southern Illinois Arts and Crafts 
Guild, Mrs. Audrey Trovillion, Brownfield, has published an album of musical 
compositions written by her husband, the late Hal V. Trovillion, it was announced 
today by Frank Sehnert, president of the Guild and a community consultant at 
Southern Illinois University. 

Sehnert said the album, entitled "Maplehurst Album," was published in 
conjunction with the Guild and consists of some 40 songs, some of them for choral 
groups. 

"To our knowledge, this is the first music composed by a southern Illinois 
native son while living in the area," Sehnert said. 



-Ik- 



The Carbondale Rotorian 

bondale Rotary Club Meets Every Wednesday Noon at the Elks Club 

Charter Club No. 743 - May I. 1920 

Vol. 5 No. 23 December 10, 1962 

NO MEETING THIS WEDNESDAY . For those absent-minded members, this is a reminder that 
there will not be a meeting this Wednesday noon. This will enable all of us to rest 
up in preparation for the following night at the University Center at SIU. 

THE BIG CHRISTMAS PARTY will start at 6:30 p.m. and it promises to be one of the 
highlights of the season in Carbondale. Some 250 persons will be on hand for a fine 
roast beef dinner, plus an international Christmas program, plus lots of good fellow- 
ship and the uplifting influence of the ladies. The Herrin and Murphysboro clubs 
will be represented by more than 100 Rotarians and Rotary-Anns. There will be more 
than 100 from the Carbondale Club, plus our foreign student guests. Those who are 
sharing the Christmas spirit by bringing foreign students will be called this weekend 
and informed who they are to bring and where to pick them up. In case you worry 
about paying for your tickets, President Tom assures us the tab will be added to the 
next quarterly bill. 

LAST WEEK we enjoyed a fine talk on how we look to our Latin American neighbors by 
Dr. A, W. Bork, director of the Latin American Institute of SIU, who has lived for 

14 years south of the border. It was not a flattering picture he painted but he had 
some practical suggestions as to how we can be better neighbors in this hemisphere. 

SPEAKING OF PROGRAMS it is the unbiased judgment of this writer that the programs of 
our own club are far above the caliber of the average club. Sometimes you have to be 
away for a year to sharpen your perspective, but it certainly is true that the quality 
and variety of our programs compare favorably with Rotary programs anywhere. The 
moral of this editorial is obvious. Plan to attend regularly. It not only improves 
our attendance record, but you may be surprised at how much valuable information you 
will collect. 

15 THERE SUCH AN ANIMAL ? The Buyer- Seller-Competitor- Relations Committee, headed by 
Henry Rehn, has borrowed a leaf from Diogenes and by substituting an information 
blank for a lantern is looking for the most courteous salesman in the Carbondale area. 
Members are asked to nominate their candidates for this notable distinction and 
Rotarians are not disqualified. When all the returns are in, sometime in January ^ 
the winner will be honored at a meeting and given a suitable award. 

NOTHING GIVES US OLDSTERS an inferiority complex quite as fast as seeing how 
intelligent and alert the next generation is. In fact last week when one of our 
high school guests from University High School stretched his six-feet plus form 
skyward, Pres. Tom was so impressed he remarked that he hoped the young man would 









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The Carbondole Rotarian 

Car bondale Rotary Club Meets Every Wednesday Noon at the Elks Club 

Charter Club No. 743 - May I. 1920 



JoUJ_Jo 1 J3 December 10, 1962 

MQ MEETING THIS WEDNESDAY. For those absent-minded members, this is a reminder that 
there will not be a meeting this Wednesday noon. This will enable all of us to rest 
up in preparation for the following night at the University Center at SIU. 

THE BIG CHRISES PARTY will start at 6:30 p.m. and it promises to be one of the 
highlights of the season in Carbondale. Some 250 persons will be on hand for a fine 
roast beef dinner, plus an international Christmas program, plus lots of good fellow- 
ship and the uplifting influence of the ladies. The Herrin and Murphysboro clubs 
will be represented by more than 100 Rotarians and Rotary-Anns. There will be more 
than 100 from the Carbondale Club, plus our foreign student guests. Those who are 
sharing the Christmas spirit by bringing foreign students will be called this weekend 
and informed who they are to bring and where to pick them up. In case you worry 
about paying for your tickets, President Tom assures us the tab will be added to the 
next quarterly bill. 

LAST WEEK we enjoyed a fine talk on how we look to our Latin American neighbors by 
Dr. A, W. Boric, director of the Latin American Institute of SIU, who has lived for 

14 years south of the border. It was not a flattering picture he painted but he had 
some practical suggestions as to how we can be better neighbors in this hemisphere. 

SPEAKING OF PROGRAMS it Is the unbiased judgment of this writer that the programs of 
our own club are far above the caliber of the average club. Sometimes you have to be 
away for a year to sharpen your perspective, but it certainly is true that the quality 
and variety of our programs compare favorably with Rotary programs anywhere. The 
moral of this editorial is obvious. Plan to attend regularly. It not only improves 
our attendance record, but you may be surprised at how much valuable information you 
will collect. 

15 THERE SUCH AN ANIMAL ? The Buyer-Seller-Competitor-Relations Committee, headed by 
Kenry Rehn, has borrowed a leaf from Diogenes and by substituting an information 
blank for a lantern is looking for the most courteous salesman in the Carbondale area. 
Members are asked to nominate their candidates for this notable distinction and 
Rotarians are not disqualified. When all the returns are in, sometime in January, 
the winner will be honored at a meeting and given a suitable award. 

NOTHING GIVES US OLDSTERS an inferiority complex quite as fast as seeing how 
intelligent and alert the next generation is. In fact last week when one of our 
high school guests from University High School stretched his six-feet plus form 
skyward, Pres. Tom was so impressed he remarked that he hoped the young man would 
become a Rotarian — when he grew up. Our guests were Miss Chris Boner and Bill Lewis 
and they were introduced by Chuck Southard, chairman of the Student Guests Committee. 

NAMES MAKE NEWS : Demonstrating that there is no buyers' strike in these parts, Vice 
President Max Sappenfield is trying to find an excuse for a trip so he can try out 
his handsome new car on the road. Announcing that we were running behind schedule 
last Wednesday, song leader Bob Vokac made what was easily the longest speech of his 
career. Past District Gov. Willis Swartz visited the Harrisburg Club on Nov. 19. 
Other makeups include Don Crocker at Murphysboro and Julian Lauchner at Urbana. And 
as a space filler, we note that ye editor has been named chairman of the Urbana 
Renewal Committee of the City Plan Commission. 

52 IN 63 : No, our computer has not broken down. The figures are a reminder that 
January is Rotary Magazine Week—the exact dates are Jan. 20-26, and they mark the 
52nd birthday of The Rotarian, which with Revista Rotaria have a combined circulation 
of more than 440,000 in 130 countries. It should also be a reminder that there is a 
lot of fine reading in the January issue, which will arrive soon. 

STOLEN : As the cannibals stoked up the fire in which a white explorer was being 
roasted the chief asked if he had anything to say. His reply was: "Yes, I am 
smoking more now and enjoying it less. "...Then there was the Rotarian whose desire 
as a boy was to wear long pants. He got his wish, now no one wears pants any longer 
than he does... Bill Lyons contributes this one: Label on a package of fish in an 
express office: "If not delivered in ten days, don't bother. "...From the Marion 
Rotascope: "You are never too old to learn a new way to be foolish." 



Service CfUe Self- die Trofib Mod QYL Serves 3ed 



CARBONDALE ROTARY CLUB — 1962-63 



VICE-PRESIDENT 

Max Sappenfield 



GOVERNOR DIST. 651 PRESIDENT 

Norman Beck Tom Easterly 

DIRECTORS: Frank Gumm, Ken Miller, Max Sappenfield, Bob Vokac 
PAST DISTRICT GOVERNOR: Lester Webb PAST PRESIDENT: Harry Goldstein 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 
Jim Mowry 



COMMITTEES 



CLUB SERVICE 

Max Sappenfield, Director 
ATTENDANCE 

Bryan Kimmel, Chairman 
CLASSIFICATION 

Carl Birkholz, Chairman 
CLUB BULLETIN 

Bill Lyons, Chairman 
FELLOWSHIP - 
SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 

John Q. Clark; Chairman 
MAGAZINE 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Roye Bryant, Chairman 
MEMBERSHIP 

Clyde Winkler, Chairman 
PROGRAM 

Max Sappenfield, Chairman 
AUDITING 

W. B. Crane, Jr., Chairman 
MUSIC 

George Hand, Chairman 
LEGISLATION 

Herb Settle, Chairman 
HISTORY 

John Allen, Chairman 



Name Nickname 

Abbott, Talbert W. (Abbott) 
Adams, George W. (George) 
Armstrong, John M. (John) 
Birkholz, Carl K. (Carl) 
Bryant, Roye R. (Roye) 
Budslick, William (Bill) 
Bushee, Ralph W. (Ralph) 
Campisi, Paul J. (Paul) 
Clark, John Q. (John) 
Clayton, Charles C. (Charley) 
Crane, William B., Jr. (Bill) 
Crocker, D. R. (Don) 
Curtis, Harry C. (Harry) 
Easterly, Thomas A. (Tom) 
Eddings, W. L. (Tinner) 
Feirich, Charles E. (Charley) 
Fisher, Harvey I. (Harvey) 
Frazer, C. A. (C.A.) 
Gallington, Ralph O. (Ralph) 
Goldstein, Harry S. (Golde) 
Gray, Ralph (Ralph) 
Gumm, Frank L. (Frank) 
Hamblen, John W. (John) 
Hand, George H. (George) 
Hoffman, Paul M. (Paul) 
Hosley, Neil W. (Neil) 
Joseph, R. C. (Joe) 
Keith, Malcolm Robert (Bob) 
Kimmel, Bryan (Bryan) 
Kimmel, Philip (Phip) 
Klingberg, Frank L. (Frank) 
Koonce, Harry (Harry) 
Lee, W. D. (Doug) 
Long, Howard R. (H.R.) 
Lyons, William H. (Bill) 
MacMillan, Alexander R. (Mac) 



VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

Frank Gumm, Director 
BUYER-SELLER- 
COMPETITOR-RELATIONS 

Henry J. Rehn, Chairman 
EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE 
RELATIONS 

Curt Mann, Chairman 
FOUR WAY TEST & 
COMMUNITY 
GOVERNMENT 

Mason Parker, Chairman 
OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Neil Hosley, Chairman 



COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Kenneth Miller, Director 
YOUTH 

Paul Hoffman, Chairman 
COMMUNITY SAFETY 

James Wallace, Chairman 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Don Crocker, Chairman 
SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS & 
STUDENT LOANS 

Frank Klingberg, Chairman 
STUDENT GUESTS 

Chuck Southard, Chairman 
INTER-SERVICE 
CLUB MEETINGS 

A. R. MacMillan, Chairman 



ROSTER 



Membership or Classification 

Senior Active 

Edu. — History 

Gas & Oil Wholesaling 

Art Goods — Retailing 

Senior Active 

Motor Courts 

Edu. — Library 

Edu. — Sociology 

Edu. — High School Principal 

Edu. — Journal Publishing 

Accounting Service 

Christianity — Prostestantism 

Senior Active 

Decorating materials — Retailing 

Heating Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Zoology 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Industrial Education 

Men's Furnishings — Retailing 

Real Estate Agency 

Associations — YMCA Director 

Edu. — Computing Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Marketing 

Edu. — Forestry 

R.R. Transp. — Dispatching 

Plastics — Mfg. 

Petroleum — Production 

Taxi Service 

Edu. — Government 

R.R. Transp. — Div. Supt. 

Television — Service 

Edu. — Journalism 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Transportation 



Name Nickname 

Mann, Curt F. (Curt) 
Mars, John T. (John) 
McKeefery, William J. (Bill) 
McRoy, Paul F. (Paul) 
Miller, Kenneth R. (Ken) 
Mowry, James B. (Jim) 
Murray, Glen H. (Glen) 
Murrie, B. J. (B.J.) 
Nagel, William E. (Bill) 
Neunlist, Dempsey V. (D.V.) 
Parker, H. M. (Mason) 
Parrish, Carl A. (Cap) 
Parrish, Gordon A. (Gordon) 
Pulley, Charles (Charles) 
Rehn, Henry J. (Henry) 
Renfro, Louis F. (L.F.) 
Sappenfield, Max M. (Max) 
Sederlin, Elvin L. (E.L.) 
Semar, Preston 
Settle, Herbert B. (Herb) 
Southard, Charles (Chuck) 
Stafford, Eugene (Gene) 
Swartz, Willis G. (Bill) 
Swick, Ralph D. (Ralph) 
Veath, Irose J. (I. J.) 
Vokac, Robert B. (Bob) 
Wiegand, G. Carl (Carl) 
Winkler, Clyde V. (Clyde) 
Allen, John W. (John) 
Davis, Robert W., (Bob) 
Dill, John D. (John) 
Hodge, John R. (John) 
Jordon, Roy V. (Roy) 
Lentz, E. G. (Gib) 
Smith, Clyde L. (Clyde) 



INTERNATIONAL SERVICE 

Robert Vokac, Director 
INTERNATIONAL 
CONTACTS 

Howard Long, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Paul Campisi, Chairman 
ROTARY FOUNDATION 

Wilis Swartz, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
STUDENT PROJECTS 

Ralph Bushee, Chairman 



Membership or Classification 

Men's Clothing — Retailing 

Banking — Savings 

Edu. — Admin. Acad. Affairs 

Broadcasting Services 

Edu. — University Admin. 

Horticulture — Research 

House Furniture — Retailing 

Building Construction 

Edu. — Tech. Adult Edu. 

Comercial Photography 

Elec. Light & Power Service 

Insurance — Life 

Milk — Distributing 

Edu. — Architectural Service 

Edu. — School of Business 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Government 

Public Health 

Loans — Auto Financing 

Highway Eng. Utilities 

Edu. — Student Counseling 

Ins. — Health and Hospital 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Accounting 

Sporting Goods — Retailing 

Edu. — Placements 

Edu. — Economics 

Past Service 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 




From Bill Lyons 12-11-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. ~ A Southern Illinois University debate team of 
Lynn Vuich, Palos Heights (12801 S. Mason) and Carol Williams, Anna, were 
championship runners up in the women's division of the Southwestern (Kan.) 
College tournament Saturday (Dec. 8). 

The SIU twosome defeated Northern Illinois in the quarterfinals and North 
Texas State in the semifinals before losing to Wisconsin State of Oshkosh in the 
title decision. Miss Vuich is a freslasan and Miss Williams is a sophomore. 

A fourth place finish at the Wake Forest (N.C.) College meet by SIU's varsity 
team of Phil Wander, Bloomington, and Richard Fulkerson, Carbondale, wound up fall 
term debate competition. Southern's next tournament activity will be at the 
Illinois State University invitational the first weekend in January. 



-pb- 



CARBONDALE ROTARY CLUB — 1962-63 

GOVERNOR DIST. 651 PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT SECRETARY-TREASURER 

Norman Beck Tom Easterly Max Sappenfield Jim Mowry 

DIRECTORS: Frank Gumm, Ken Miller, Max Sappenfield, Bob Vokac 

PAST DISTRICT GOVERNOR: Lester Webb PAST PRESIDENT: Harry Goldstein 

COMMITTEES 



CLUB SERVICE 

Max Sappenfield, Director 
ATTENDANCE 

Bryan Kimmel, Chairman 
CLASSIFICATION 

Carl Birkholz, Chairman 
CLUB BULLETIN 

Bill Lyons, Chairman 
FELLOWSHIP, - 
SERGEAkT-AT-ARMS 

John Q. Clark; Chairman 
MAGAZINE - 
PUBUC RELATIONS 

Roye Bryant, Chairman 
MEMBERSHIP 

Clyde Winkler, Chairman 
PROGRAM 

Max Sappenfield, Chairman 
AUDITING 

W. B. Crane, Jr., Chairman 
MUSIC 

George Hand, Chairman 
LEGISLATION 

Herb Settle, Chairman 
HISTORY 

John Allen, Chairman 



Name Nickname 

Abbott, Talbert W. (Abbott) 
Adams, George W. (George) 
Armstrong, John M. (John) 
Birkholz, Carl K. (Carl) 
Bryant, Roye R. (Roye) 
Budslick, William (Bill) 
Bushee, Ralph W. (Ralph) 
Campisi, Paul J. (Paul) 
Clark, John Q. (John) 
Clayton, Charles C. (Charley) 
Crane, William B., Jr. (Bill) 
Crocker, D. R. (Don) 
Curtis, Harry C. (Harry) 
Easterly, Thomas A. (Tom) 
Eddings, W. L. (Tinner) 
Feirich, Charles E. (Charley) 
Fisher, Harvey I. (Harvey) 
Frazer, C. A. (C.A.) 
GaUington, Ralph O. (Ralph) 
Goldstein, Harry S. (Golde) 
Gray, Ralph (Ralph) 
Gumm, Frank L. (Frank) 
Hamblen, John W. (John) 
Hand, George H. (George) 
Hoffman, Paul M. (Paul) 
Hosley, Neil W. (Neil) 
Joseph, R. C. (Joe) 
Keith, Malcolm Robert (Bob) 
Kimmel, Bryan (Bryan) 
Kimmel, Philip (Phip) 
Klingberg, Frank L. (Frank) 
Koonce, Harry (Harry) 
Lee, W. D. (Doug) 
Long, Howard R. (H.R.) 
Lyons, WUIiam H. (Bill) 
MacMillan, Alexander R. (Mac) 



VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

Frank Gumm, Director 
BUYER-SELLER- 
COMPET1TOR-RELATIONS 

Henry J. Rehn, Chairman 
EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE 
RELATIONS 

Curt Mann, Chairman 
FOUR WAY TEST & 
COMMUNITY 
GOVERNMENT 

Mason Parker, Chairman 
OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Neil Hosley, Chairman 



COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Kenneth Miller, Director 
YOUTH 

Paul Hoffman. Chairman 
COMMUNITY SAFETY 

James Wallace, Chairman 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Don Crocker, Chairman 
SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS '& 
STUDENT LOANS 

Frank Klingberg, Chairman 
STUDENT GUESTS 

Chuck Southard, Chairman 
INTER-SERVICE 
CLUB MEETINGS 

A. R. MacMillan, Chairman 



ROSTER 



Membership or Classification 

Senior Active 

Edu. — History 

Gas & Oil Wholesaling 

Art Goods — Retailing 

Senior Active 

Motor Courts 

Edu. — Library 

Edu. — Sociology 

Edu. — High School Principal 

Edu. — Journal Publishing 

Accounting Service 

Christianity — Prostestantism 

Senior Active 

Decorating materials — Retailing 

Heating Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Zoology 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Industrial Education 

Men's Furnishings — Retailing 

Real Estate Agency 

Associations — YMCA Director 

Edu. — Computing Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Marketing 

Edu. — Forestry 

R.R. Transp. — Dispatching 

Plastics — Mfg. 

Petroleum — Production 

Taxi Service 

Edu. — Government 

R.R. Transp. — Div. Supt. 

Television — Service 

Edu. — Journalism 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Transportation 



INTERNATIONAL SERVICE 

Robert Vokac, Director 
INTERNATIONAL 
CONTACTS 

Howard Long, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Paul Campisi. Chairman 
ROTARY FOUNDATION 

Wilis Swartz, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
STUDENT PROJECTS 

Ralph Bushee, Chairman 



Name Nickname 

Mann, Curt F. (Curt) 
Mars, John T. (John) 
McKeefery, William J. (Bill) 
McRoy, Paul F. (Paul) 
Miller, Kenneth R. (Ken) 
Mowry, James B. (Jim) 
Murray, Glen H. (Glen) 
Murrie, B. J. (B.J.) 
Nagel, William E. (Bill) 
Neunlist, Dempsey V. (D.V.) 
Parker, H. M. (Mason) 
Parrish, Carl A. (Cap) 
Parrish, Gordon A. (Gordon) 
Pulley, Charles (Charles) 
Rehn, Henry J. (Henry) 
Renfro, Louis F. (L.F.) 
Sappenfield, Max M. (Max) 
Sederlin, Elvin L. (EX.) 
Semar, Preston 
Settle, Herbert B. (Herb) 
Southard, Charles (Chuck) 
Stafford, Eugene (Gene) 
Swartz, Willis G. (Bill) 
Swick, Ralph D. (Ralph) 
Veath, Irose J. (I. J.) 
Vokac, Robert B. (Bob) 
Wiegand, G. Carl (Carl) 
Winkler, Clyde V. (Clyde) 
Allen, John W. (John) 
Davis. Robert W., (Bob) 
Dill, John D. (John) 
Hodge, John R. (John) 
Jordon, Roy V. (Roy) 
Lentz, E. G. (Gib) 
Smith, Clyde L. (Clyde) 



Membership or Classification 

Men's Clothing — Retailing 

Banking — Savings 

Edu. — Admin. Acad. Affaiis 

Broadcasting Services 

Edu. — University Admin. 

Horticulture — Research 

House Furniture — Retailing 

Building Construction 

Edu. — Tech. Adult Edu. 

Comercial Photography 

Elec. Light & Power Service 

Insurance — Life 

Milk — Distributing 

Edu. — Architectural Service 

Edu. — School of Business 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Government 

Public Health 

Loans — Auto Financing 

Highway Eng. Utilities 

Edu. — Student Counseling 

Ins. - — Health and Hospital 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Accounting 

Sporting Goods — Retailing 

Edu. — Placements 

Edu. ■ — I Economics 

Past Service 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 



AREA ROTARY MEETINGS— 

Monday Noon — ■ Centralia, Harrisburg, Herrin, New Athens, O'Fallon 

Monday Evening — Cairo, Chester, Cisne, Columbia, Freeburg, Golconda, Mt. Carmel, Olncy, Pinckneyville, W. Salem 

Tuesday Noon — Albion, Belleville, Chicago, Eldorado,' Mt. 'Vernon, Urbana, West Frankfort 

Tuesday Evening — Benton, Carmi, DuQuoin, Flora, Murphysboro,- Sparta, Waterloo, Wayne City 

Wednesday Noon — j Carbondale, East St. Louis, Johnston ' City, Lebanon ... 

Thursday Noon — Anna, Carlyle, Fairfield, Lawrenceville, Marion, Metropolis, St. Louis 

Thursday Evening — Marissa, Mascoutah, .Nashville, Zeigler 

Friday Noon — Louisville, Salem 

Friday Evening — Crossville, Millstadt 




From Bill Lyons 12-11-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbonda le, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. ~ A Southern Illinois University debate team of 
Lynn Vuich, Palos Heights (12801 S. Mason) and Carol Williams, Anna, were 
championship runners up in the women's division of the Southwestern (Kan.) 
College tournament Saturday (Dec. 8). 

The SIU twosome defeated Northern Illinois in the quarterfinals and North 
Texas State in the semifinals before losing to Wisconsin State of Oshkosh in the 
title decision. Miss Vuich is a freshman and Miss Williams is a sophomore. 

A fourth place finish at the Wake Forest (N.C.) College meet by SIU's varsity 
team of Phil Wander, Bloomington, and Richard Fulkerson, Carbondale, wound up fall 
term debate competition. Southern's next tournament activity will be at the 
Illinois State University invitational the first weekend in January. 



-pb- 



^ 






From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453 - 2276 



12 - 11 - 62 

Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL,, Dec.— The growing needs of special education in Illinois 
will be on the agenda when psychologists working with the state Office of Public 
Instruction meet Thursday and Friday (Dec. 13 and 14) at Southern Illinois 
University. 

The meeting, expected to draw 100 psychologists and guests, is sponsored by 
the Southern Illinois Office of Area Psychologists, located on the SIU campus. 
There are four such offices in the state, with the task of providing psychological 
services, special education programs and gifted student projects to the public 
schools. Sam Thornton, chief psychologist for the Carbondale area office covering 
the 32 southern Illinois counties, says it is the only direct service to public 
schools by the Superintendent of Public Instruction staff. 

Dr. Virginia Harris of Springfield, supervisor of the state psychological 
services, will be the speaker at a noon session Thursday at the Agriculture 
Building seminar room. The group will spend the morning at the SIU Employment 
Training Center at Ordill. 

DuQuoin School Superintendent Ray Todd and Wilma Childers, curriculum 

coordinator in the West Frankfort school system, will participate in an afternoon 

discussion of psychological examinations and follow-ups. Also speaking will be 

Floyd Cunningham, Jackson County Child Welfare Service official, and Carbondale 

area office staffers Dan Ward and Gerald Kish. William Howe, head of the 

Egyptian Association for Retarded children, and Sen. John Gilbert of Carbondale 

are among other speakers set for the meeting. Gilbert will discuss state statutes 

on school programs for the mentally handicapped, multiple handicapped and 

gifted children. 

The area office was set up in Carbondale this year, Thornton says county 
participation in the psychological programs for downstate schools has risen 35 
per cent since the four-man staff was located here. Other offices are at 
Galesburg, Chicago and Decatur. 

-pb- 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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12 - 11 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



SIU NEWS SUMMARY 
FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION 



Architects' plans for two new buildings on the Carbondale campus have been 
approved by Southern Illinois University's Board of Trustees. Both are scheduled 
for construction next summer, and are financed with money already allocated from 
the State Universities Bond Issue. The buildings are a general classroom 
structure designed to seat more than 27 -hundred students. ..and a School of 
Communications building to feature classroom, laboratory and production facilities 
for journalism, speech, theater, speech correction, and printing and photography. 
Included in plans for the classroom building: four large lecture halls radiating 
out from a central audio-visual projection and closed circuit television program 
control center. 

***** ***** 

Sabbatical leaves for seven S-I-U faculty members whose service to Southern 
totals 1-hundred 28 years have been approved by the Board of Trustees. Among the 
leaves granted: three 30-year veterans to travel in Europe and South America. 

***** ***** 

The growing needs of special education in Illinois will be on the agenda 
\*hen psychologists working with the State's Office of Public Instruction meet at 
S-I-U Thursday and Friday (Dec. 13-14). The meeting is expected to draw 1- 
hundred psychologists and guests. 

High school seniors who plan to attend Southern Illinois University in the 
fall of 1963 should make application for admission now. That admonition was 
given today by Wilbur Venerable, acting associate director of admissions. 
Venerable says students should NOT send transcripts or other material with their 
first letter. ***** * ** ** 



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A chartered flight to Europe combined x^ith three university courses tailored 
for presentation there will be offered again this summer to students, staff and 
families of Southern. Raymond H. Dey (DIE) says the program is designed to 
afford students and staff the advantages of foreign travel and study. 1-hundred 
three students and faculty members took part in the inaugural flight last summer. 
This year*s flight, costing about 3-hundred 44 dollars, will depart St. Louis 
June 17th. 

***** ***** 

Russell Peithman, curator of exhibits at the S-I-U Museum, has accepted a 
position as director of the Children's Nature Museum at Charlotte, North Carolina 
effective February 1st. Peithman (PIETH ' -MAN) has been connected with the S-I-U 
Museum since 1944. 

***** ***** 

Color.. .desirable eye appeal in all meals is a must for the professional 
cooks during the holidays, says Henrietta Becker, food specialist at Southern 
Illinois University. She says... use lots of red and green garnishes on 
individual trays for the hospital patient, around various containers on steam or 
refrigerated tables in the school luncheon or cafeteria, on the individual plate 
at restaurants. 

-Ik- 






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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



^ 



1 



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12 - 11 - 62 



Release: I14MEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — A record total of 253 students are attending 
Southern Illinois University this year at the Carbondale campus as General Assembly 
Scholarship winners. 

The tuition scholarships are awarded to deserving high school graduates by 
members of the state legislature. Members of the General Assembly are granted two 
scholarship certificates each year, one for use at the University of Illinois 
and the other for SIU or the four state teachers universities. 

Those with scholarships at SIU, by home towns, are: 



ANNA: Thomas Boyd, Charles Jean, 106 E. 
Chestnut; Edward Wahl, 509 S. Green 

BARRINGTON: Robert Monsen, 237 Donlea Rd. 
BARTONVILLE: Sue Shreve, 4 Scott PI. 
BELLEVILLE: Gloria Clemmons, 5 Hilldale 
BELLW00D: Thomas Oliva, 1121 S. 23rd 
BENSENVILLE: Jeffrey Vidas, 702 W. Green 
BENTON: Larry Summers, 212 N. Studell; 
James Upchurch, 1217 N. Main; Ronald 
Lynch, Rt. 2 

BERWYN: James Chmelik, 1632 East Ave. 
BIGGSVILLE: Patricia Smith 
BREESE: Daniel Hitpas, 185 N. 3rd 
BR0OKP0RT: Stanley McGhee 
BUNKER HILL: John Behrens 

CAIRO: Pamela Morgan, 322 27th 

CALUMET CITY: John Albin, 1590 Shirley Dr. 

CAMP POINT: Allan Jacobs 

CARBONDALE: Wayne Anderson, Ronald Bullock, 

Max Carr, Keith McReynolds, James Pierson, 

Joseph Rowand, Oriville Schlatter 

CARMI: Walter Shook, Rt. 3; Fred Williams, 

211 Herbert 

CARRIER MILLS: Lowell Keel, 11 E.Trammell 

CARTERVILLE: David Basler, 303 Barr; 

Ronald Bull; Alan George, 500 Pennsylvania 

CATLIN: Steven Johnson, Julia Leverich, 

Sandra Songer 

CAVE-IN-ROCK: Albert Kaegi, Patricia Oxford 

CEDARVILLE: Gary Wagner 

CENTRALIA: Donald Demijan, 215 N.Sycamore; 

Margaret Doran, 228 N. James; Betty 

Parker 

CHAMPAIGN: Mary Eichhorst, 1203 W. 

University; Philip Martin, 814 W. Clark 

CHATHAM: Francis Foster 

-more- 



CHESTER: Donald Harrison, 1422 "igh 
CHICAGO: Leocadia Aquino, 5024 N. 
Winthrop; Charles Argento, 10854 S. 
Emerald; Barbara Augustyn,1319.W.Cull- 
erton; Zelma Batteast, 9319 S. Rhodes; 
Larmita Bingley, 2901 S. Parkway; 
Sheldon Chesky, 77585 Chappel; Penelope 
Donahue, 743 N. Central; Judith Fischer, 
5955 West Iowa; Marjorie Gaithee, 6359 
S. Kimbark; James Glenos, 10107 S. 
Calumet; Rose Hertl, 3003 S. Homan; Atha 
Hunt, 3252 S. Prairie; Bruce Kardon, 
3956 W. Lake; Nancy Klafin, 3525 N. 
Rutherford; Diane Kosowski, 3802 S. 
Wolcott; Leonard Lukasik, 2432 N. Tripp; 
Michael McDivit, 7236 S. Crandon; Edward 
Nagle Jr., 3544 S. California; Raymond 
O'Brien, 2501 E. 72nd; Ronald Pedersen, 
242 N. Mason; Judith Pope, 4610 N. 
Ashland; Jesse Reed III, 9254 Dunbar Ct. ; 
Wynn Righton, 6453 S. Seeley; Lorene 
Roberts, 6823 Calumet; Kennet Stahlke, 
2312 Lunt; Robert Streff, 2035 W. Gran- 
ville; Bona Talcott, 2094 W. Chase; 
Raymond Vincent, 3917 Sayre; Mary Wask- 
owski, 931 N. Wolcott; Harold Weisnicht, 
4117 N. Richmond 

COLLINSVILLE: Carolyn Mahach, 114 
Lincolnwood 

COLUMBIA: Gerold Young, R.R.I 
CREAL SPRINGS: Edward Kelley 
CRETE: Jill Siwicki, 124 Cooper PI. 

DANVILLE: Joan Boughey, 25 S, Virginia 
DECATUR: James McNamara, 862 W. Olive; 
Howard Newell, 1188 W. Sunset; Darrell 
Willis, 1540 Florian 






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DIXON: Charles Coss, 722 E. Fellows; 

Raymond Leake, 510 Squire 

DOWNERS GROVE: James Hoppenstedt, 042 

Curtis 

EAST ALTON: Donna Zielinski, 4 Wilshire 

EAST ST. LOUIS: Sharon Brown, 3050 Rege nt 

PI.; Ursulene Cason, 1812 Piggott; John 

Driscoll Jr., 841 K. 76th; Geraldine 

Palovick, 1345 W. 52nd; Patricia Tenllado, 

2744 W. 40th 

ELDORADO: Joseph Butler, 1513 Reed; James 

Hill, 905 Grant; John Towle, 1201 West; 

Rita Towle, 1201 West 

ELMWOOD PARK: Arthur Polletti, 2933 N. 75th 

Ct.; Joanne Sandro, 1918 N. 74th MAKANDA: Delmar Landis Jr., 

EVANSTON: James Avery Jr., 2304 E. Emerson; MANHATTAN: Jim Gast 



J0NESB0R0: James Lemons, 700 Heacock 

KEWANEE: Robert Godke Jr., R.R.I 

LAGRANGE PARK: Thomas Goodloe, 820 N. 
Waiola 

LAKE VILLA: Richard Prange, Rt. 2 
LANSING: Roger Visnack, 17633 Roy 
LASALLE: Janice Weindorf, 1597 Campbell 
LEMONT: Robert Thomas, W. 135th 
LINCOLN: Dale Wheeler, 941 N. State 
LINCOLNWOOD: Heather Wallace, 4606 Pratt 
LOMBARD: Warren Johnson, 620 E. Washington 



Eleanor Estell, 1335 Hovland Ct.; Stephan 
I-Iarczos, 1422 Greenleaf ; John Rubin, 1605 
Thelin Ct. 
EVANSVILLE: Richard Car on 

FARMER CITY: Paul Zimmerman, R.R.2 

GALESBURG: Thomas Foster, 1091 E. North 

GEFF: John Deem 

GERMANTOWN: Thomas Deien 

GILLESPIE: Roy Heidinger, 705 1st; George 

Lacey, 305 Cedar 

GOLCONDA: Bette Coovert 

G0REVILLE: Billy Newton 

GRANITE CITY: Mary McElroy, 1561 Johnson 

Rd. 

GRAYVILLE: Gary Wilson, 309 S. Second 

HANNA CITY: Judith Collins, 301 N. Runkle 
HARRISBURG: Larry Baldwin, 631 N. Webster; 
Sarah Cotton, 215 W. Lincoln; Jerry Kane; 
Reba Mayberry, 500 E. Walnut; Modeene 
Melton, 320 E. South; Samuel Parker, 205A 
W. Church 

HARVEY: John Tilton, 544 E. 147th 
HERRIN: Jerry Anderson, S. 13th; Loretta 
Jeter s, 305 S. 13th; Jerry Roberson, 304 
S. 20th; Michael Say lor, 500 W. Monroe; 
Judith Taylor, 901 N. 11th; William 
Wheeler, 1512 W. Monroe 
HILLSDALE: Bonnie Stephenson 
HINSDALE: Jean Agrimonti, 827 W. North; 
Judith Colvin, 5604 S. Madison 



MARION: Larry Deaton, 026 Morgan Dr. 
MATTESON: Patricia Kindt, 3727 216th PI. 
MATTOON: Thomas Rappe, 3301 Prairie; 
Marylla Ryan, 3120 Western; Donald Wells, 
1109 S. 17th 

MCLEAiiSBORO: Charles White, R.R.5; 
Thomas Biggerstaff, 501 E. Market; 
Sandra Wells, 201 N. Hancock; Johnny 
Brockett, 503 W. Carpenter; Patricia 
Eaton, RFD 5; Patricia Hall, R.R. 2; 
John Kern, Ewing; Richard Lasswell; 
Verna Periman, Rt. 5; Marilyn Varnier, 
R.R. 2; Harold Webb, 604 E. St. Charles 
METROPOLIS: Thomas Jennings Jr., 317 
Ferry; Gary McGinnis, Rt. 1; David 
Wehrmeyer, 314 Filmore 
MINONK: Byron Sabol, 431 E. 6th 
MONTGOMERY: Jon Fitzgerald, 226 S. Main 
MONTICELLO: James Davidson, 910 S. 
Buchanan 

MT. CARMEL: Ralph Litherland, R.R. 1 
MT. VERNON: Lowell Russell, R.R. 7 
MURPHYSBORO: Charles Bock, 2140 Spruce; 
Donald Elmore, R.R.I; Judith Guetersloh, 
R.R.2; Mary Hoffecker, 1300 Hall; John 
Hoffman, R.R.I. 

NASHVILLE: Anthony Lehde, Rt. 2 
NOKOiilS: Robert Spengel, 443 S. Spruce 
N0RTHBR00K: Demares Harm, 1239 Country 
Lane Rd. 

OLNEY: Roberta Beal, 930 W. Elm; 



H0MEW00D: Sharon Edmundson, 1256 Olive Rd. Raymond Herman, RFD 5; Kenneth Runyon, 



H00PEST0N: Sandra Erickson, 64 E. 
Washington St. 
H0YLET0N: Judith Kasten 

ILLIPOLIS: Edward Ramsey 

JACKSONVILLE: Max Belzer, 1310 S. Clay 
J0LIET: Robert Hinze, 1107 Clara; Robert 



816 W. Elm; James Wattleworth, 206 Minosa 

Dr. 

OTTAWA: Samuel Fox, 1103 W. Main; Alan 

Ninness, 11 Gridley PI. 

PALATINE: Richard Brodkorb, Rt. 1, Ella 

Rd. 

PALESTINE: Margaret Schulz, 500 W. 



Meek, 1100 Westminster 



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PANA: Dennis Pastor, 512 11. Poplar 
PARIS: David Massey, 514 N. Main 
PARK FOREST: Richard Horchler, 241 Sauk 
Trail 
*PEKIN: Joseph Bocse, 1306 N. llthj 
PEORIA: Marion Hefner, 1415 S. Westmore- 
land; Hike Pfaff, 2603 W. Nottingham; 
Larry Shirley, 6110 Chippewa Ridge; Steven 
Slayton, 1913 N. Broadway 
PONTIAC: Janet Myers, 825 S. Ualcott; 
Linda Rich, R.R.I 
PRAIRIE DU ROCHER: Marlene Shicker 

QUINCY: Grant Bergmann, S431S. Sixth; 
Gary Pabden, 326 S. 23rd; Larry Brickmann, 
1226 N. 24th 



VIENNA : Ann Dark, John Harper 

WATSEKA: Ronald Hari, 111 Jaunlta; 
Sharon Snyder, 421 E. Oak; Jon Willms 
WEST FRANKFORT: Rita Lawrence, 315 E. 5th 
WESTVILLE: Gerald Hofer, 701 S. State 
WINCHESTER: John Hanves, Rt. 1 
WINDSOR: Richard Cole Jr.; Jane Walden 
WINSLOW: Beverly Ferguson, Rt. 1 



John Harrington, 601 N. 8th; 
James Von Boeckman, 1004 Willow 



RALEIGH: Juaquita Cranfill, Rt. 1, Jerry 

Wesley, E. Church 

RANT0UL: Julie O'Neill, 229 Illinois Dr. 

RED BUD: Diane LeSauliner 

RIVER FOREST: Kathleen McLaughlin, 240 

Keystone Ave, 

ROBINSON: John Johnson, 511 IT. Franklin 

ROCK FALLS: Betty Sue Smith, 611 C-7. 2nd 

R0CKF0RD: David Heideman, 180C Huffman 

R0SELLE: Horbert Zyk, 337 Catalpa 

ST. ANNE: Margo Friedman, 457 W. Grant 

ST. ELMO: Russell Garrison, Rt. 2 

SAN JOSE: James Smiley 

SALEM: Jerry Morris, 210 S. Marion, Earl 

Williams, R.R. 4 

SESSER: Richard Stubblefield, 101 W. Lottie 

SHATTUC: Benjamin Behrens 

SHAWNEETOWN: Joseph Scates 

SHELBYVILLE: Paul Page, R.R.I; John King, 

1114 S. West Second 

SIMPSON: John Rushing 

SK0KIE: Donald Kornelly, 4952 Jar vis; 

Donald Cordes, 7852 Kenneth Ave 

SPARTA: Jeanette Hayes, Rt. 2 

SPRINGFIELD: James Farrell Jr., 817 S. 

Columbia; Donald Grant, 2331 S. Pas field; 

George Miller, 1727 Peoria Rd.; Gail 

Mrvicka, 450 W. Canedy; Olivet Willis; 

1718 S. Fourth; Robert Willis; 1718 S. 

Fourth; Terrence Blood, 2847 E. Lakeshire 

Dr.; Judith Benson, 2601 Manor 

ST0NEF0RT: Linda Powell 

STREATOR: Nan Hart, 501 W. Bluff 

SULLIVAN: Pamela Landers, R.R. 2; Jerry 

Lash, RFD 3 

SYCAMORE: Carole Dougherty, 125 Center 

Cross 



TAMAROA: Wayne Welch 
TOVEY: Fred Sapetti 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHER!! ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



12 - 12 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



Forty-three American universities and one East German institute borrowed 
materials from the Southern Illinois University Morris Library during the 
12-month period ending June 30, according to Opal Stone, assistant library 
director. 

Miss Stone tabulated the requests from universities and discovered that 399 
different items--books, pamphlets, documents and other materials— were furnished. 
In addition, materials were supplied on loan to numerous colleges, public 
libraries and museums. 

One request which was filled came from the Institut fur Tierzucht in East 
Geemany. 

The SIU Library during the same period borrowed 1,043 items from 149 
libraries. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



12 - 12 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Russell Trimble, associate professor of chemistry 
at Southern Illinois University, has been invited by the University of Illinois 
to serve as a visiting lecturer at the U. of I. next year. The position also 
would include released time and facilities for Trimble's research on cobalt 
chromium complexes currently supported by the National Science Foundation, 

Trimble said he will apply for a leave of absence to accept the position. 
A. native of Montclaire, N.J., he holds a doctoral degree from the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. He is an abstractor for "Chemical Abstracts," universal 
journal of chemical research, and is a member of MIT's Educational Council. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 






12 - 12 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Completion of the $310,000 Wesley Foundation 
building adjacent to the Southern Illinois University campus is close at hand as 
the interior of the north wing is being finished and equipped, according to the 
Rev. Ronald Seibert, foundation director. 

The first stage, completed in 1958, provided the shell of the building and 
finishing of about 75 per cent of the interior. 

The nev; project, currently underway at a cost of approximately $55,000, 
includes a library, classroom, student council office, kitchen, basement workshop 
and storage area and an additional stairway and exit with connecting sidewalks. 

During the past summer, the Foundation also completed and furnished a two-room 
efficiency apartment in the building to provide living quarters for a graduate 
student and his wife to serve as resident supervisors. 

Funds for the building are being provided from the Methodist Festival of 
Sharing program and the Foundation's "600 Club 1 ' memberships. Seibert said 92 per 
cent of the pledges for the first-stage development have been received, thus 
enabling the board of directors to pay off its indebtedness a year ahead of schedule. 
A total of $220,000 came from individuals and churches of the Southern Illinois 
Conference of the Methodist Church. A $10,000 grant from the Rresge Foundation 
was also received to apply on the first-stage development indebtedness. 

The Wesley Foundation serves as a center for spiritual, cultural and social 
activities for Methodist students attending SIU. An estimated 750 of the 2,000 
Methodist-preference students are served through the Foundation and the two 
Methodist churches in Carbondale with which the Foundation cooperates. 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 12 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — A woven milk "glass 55 and a carved butter canister 
from Ethiopia have been presented to the Southern Illinois University Museum by 
a faculty member who spent three years in that country. 

Webster Ballance, now assistant coordinator of Research and Projects at SIU, 
served from December 1955 to August 195G as first secretary and administrative 
officer at the U.S. Embassy at Addis Ababa. 

The milk and butter containers were given to him by a lieutenant in the 
Ethiopian army who knew of his interest in native crafts. Both were household 
articles made and used in one of the Ethiopian villages and represent fine examples 
of folk art, Ballance said. 

The milk container, which holds approximately a quart, is woven of some 
fiber which is charred on the inside to make it hold the liquid. A horn spout 
permits easy pouring. 

The butter dish, cylindrical in shape, holds about two pounds of butter. It 
is intricately carved on the outside and is decorated with leather thongs tipped 
with shells. 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist ' 12 - 12 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 




CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Its first scheduled dual meet of the season 
postponed last weekend, Southern Illinois University will compete in a quadrangular 
wrestling contest at the University of Oklahoma Friday and Saturday with the host 
Sooners, Wyoming and Kansas State providing the opposition. 

Coach Jim Wilkinson's Salukis were scheduled to host Findlay College, but 
the Ohioans were forced to postpone their appearance here due to weather conditions. 

Leading Southern's squad this weekend will be four of five wrestlers who 
claimed individual championships in the recent Illinois Invitational meet. They 
include Terry Finn and Frank Coniglio of Oak Lawn, Don Millard, Pekin, and 
Larry Kristoff, Carbondale. 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist ^ 12 - 12 -^ 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY ^ 

Carbondale, Illinois p ■ 

Phone: 453-2276 ' Release: IMMEDIATE 




CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Seeking their fourth straight win of the season, 
Southern Illinois University's Salukis travel to Muncie, Ind., Saturday night where 
they'll challenge Ball State College, 

The Salukis, who have topped highly-regarded St, Bonaventure, Central 
Missouri and the University of Oklahoma after dropping their opener to Gannon 
College, will be meeting Ball State for the first time. 

As hoped for by first-year coach Jack Hartman, Southern's defense has been 
a vital factor in the Saluki's success and Saturday Ttfill be keyed on stopping 
the host's Ed Butler who averaged 15 points a game last year. 

In gaining a well-earned 66-63 win over Oklahoma Monday night, Southern 
stopped a Sooner squad which had set two scoring records in its first two times 
out this season. The Sooners had set an all-time school record of 96 points in 
routing Southern Methodist in its opener and followed up \*ith an all-time high 
at home of 04 points in whipping St, John's, 

Lou Williams, one of two transfers that followed Hartman to SIU from 
Coffeyville (Kans.) Jr. College this season, was the big gun in Southern's most 
recent win as he came off the bench to score 19 points and grab 15 rebounds. Both 
he and Paul Henry, Southern's other transfer, were prep stars at Indianapolis, Ind. 

Co-captain Ed Spila, leading rebounder and most valuable player on SIU's 
squad a year ago, missed the Oklahoma contest due to an ankle injury and is a 
doubtful starter Saturday night although he is expected to make the trip. 



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Hewly installed members of the Southern Illinois University chapter of 

Kappa Alpha Hu, honorary photojournalism fraternity, shown following the 

initiation ceremony are, from left: Robert L. Miller, formerly of Freeport; 

Richard Prillaman, Potomac; Jacob T. Williams, Chicago; Donna Casey, Red Bud; 

Stephen Murtaugh, Polo, all students; and Jerry Minihan, Carbondale, a professional 

member who is an SIU photographer. KAM is an organization serving the 

professional interests of persons concerned with news photography. 

PHOTO BY INFORMATION SERVICE 12-12-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



From Bill Lyons 12 - 13 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

ATTENTION: Farm Editors 

SIU COUNTRY COLUMN 
By Albert Meyer 

In this diet-conscious age the dairy industry should capitalize on the high 
public interest in protein foods, a speaker told dairy farmers attending the recent 
Dairy Day at Southern Illinois University. Guy M. Crews, program director for the 
American Jersey Cattle Club, discussed the "magic" of milk protein. 

Protein forms a good part of the nonfat solids in whole milk which, along with 
butterfat (about 4 per cent) and other solids, make up about 13 per cent of the 
content of average milk. Casein and lactalbumin are the main parts of milk protein 
although there are small amounts of other forms of protein. Casein accounts for 
70 to GO per cent of the total protein in milk. 

The milk proteins rank quite high in quality and nutritive value because of the 
amount and kinds of amino acids they contain. These are most important to growth and 
body maintenance and are in a form easily used by the human body. Except for eggs, 
milk ranks ahead of all other common sources of protein in the human diet, he said. 

The cereal industry advertises its protein values highly. Crews says it also 
is important to use milk on cereals because the milk amino acids make the cereal 
protein more valuable in nutrition. 

Milk can be a good source of protein at less cost than red meats, for instance, 

which are looked to by many persons as important sources of protein. A quart of 

average whole milk contains from 34 to 35 grams of protein— about half the daily 

minimum needs of a healthyl50-pound adult. A pound of protein in whole fresh milk 

costs the consumer $2.44 and in American cheese (a dairy product), $2.41. In contrast, 

a pound of protein from chuck roast costs $3.38; from hamburger, $2.5G; from lamb, 

$4.65; from pork chops, $5.55; from ham, $3.66, and from salmon, $3.77. 

However, he cautioned, the consumer cannot always be influenced to buy products 
just because they are good for the body. Appeals often are more effective from the 
flavor standpoint. Not only is milk protein healthy, he said, but milk which has 
a high percentage of protein also tastes better. 

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From Bill Lyons ^ A 12-13-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY J p 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

Number 405 in a weekly series — "It Happened in Southern Illinois" — a series 
consisting of regional folklore and historical accounts suitable for feature, 
column, or editorial use. 

CHRISTMAS 

John W. Allen 

Southern Illinois University 

The history of Christmas is long and interesting. As we look into the recorded 
past we find that it was a widespread practice 2,000 years ago to observe one day 
in the year in a Christmas -like manner. The time most frequently chosen was that 
of the winter solstice, December 21 on our calendar. Pagan man observed this day 
at widely scattered places over the world. Many of the practices used then are those 
of the present Yuletide. The spirit and thought of both have common features. 
Comparisons indicate that our present Christmas is a continuation of the much older 
winter festival. 

Earlier people did not understand the winter solstice. Hence, as ttfintry days 
grew shorter and the sun sank lower in its daily course, they were filled with dread. 
Would the sun continue its decline until it completely disappeared below the horizon, 
thereby bringing eternal night? Should that happen the result would be a frozen 
world where nothing would grow, and man would perish. People accordingly implored 
their gods to halt the sun's decline, give it new life, return it to its course and 
give the world a new growing season. In the natural course of events that happened. 

People were thankful and made merry. Families and clans gathered in groups to 
feast, drink, chant and make music. They lighted fires, gave gifts, festooned 
mistletoe and other evergreens over doorways, hearths, and arches. They freed slaves 
and prisoners and fed the needy. Some even reversed the usual practice and served 
their servants. A spirit somewhat like that of today prevailed. 

Many features of their celebration persist. Kinsmen and friends gather to feast. 
Sometimes the wassail bowl is passed and they sing. In spite of central heat, fires 
and fireplaces still are prominent. At some places in America men with ropes go 
forth to cut and drag in the Yule log for the open fireplace just as they were doing 
in Britain centuries ago. Colorado and Virginia offer examples, •more- 



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From Bill Lyons ^ A 12-13-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY J P 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

Number 4G5 in a weekly series — "It Happened in Southern Illinois" -- a series 
consisting of regional folklore and historical accounts suitable for feature, 
column, or editorial use. 

CHRISTMAS 

John U. Allen 

Southern Illinois University 

The history of Christmas is long and interesting. As we look into the recorded 
past we find that it was a widespread practice 2,000 years ago to observe one day 
in the year in a Christmas -like manner. The time most frequently chosen was that 
of the winter solstice, December 21 on our calendar. Pagan man observed this day 
at widely scattered places over the world. Many of the practices used then are those 
of the present Yuletide. The spirit and thought of both have common features. 
Comparisons indicate that our present Christmas is a continuation of the much older 
winter festival. 

Earlier people did not understand the winter solstice. Hence, as wintry days 
grew shorter and the sun sank lower in its daily course, they were filled with dread. 
Would the sun continue its decline until it completely disappeared below the horizon, 
thereby bringing eternal night? Should that happen the result would be a froaen 
world where nothing would grow, and man would perish. People accordingly implored 
their gods to halt the sun's decline, give it new life, return it to its course and 
give the world a new growing season. In the natural course of events that happened. 

People were thankful and made merry. Families and clans gathered in groups to 
feast, drink, chant and make music. They lighted fires, gave gifts, festooned 
mistletoe and other evergreens over doorways, hearths, and arches. They freed slaves 
and prisoners and fed the needy. Some even reversed the usual practice and served 
their servants, A spirit somewhat like that of today prevailed. 

Many features of their celebration persist. Kinsmen and friends gather to feast. 
Sometimes the wassail bowl is passed and they sing. In spite of central heat, fires 
and fireplaces still are prominent. At some places in America men with ropes go 
forth to cut and drag in the Yule log for the open fireplace just as they were doing 
in Britain centuries ago. Colorado and Virginia offer examples, -more- 






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We use much evergreens, but do not insist that mistletoe be cut from an oak tree 
by a Druid priest clad in white and using a golden sickle. Ue sing carols and hymns, 
present gifts, and give food to those less fortunate than ourselves. Some states 
select from among the more deserving prisoners those to recieve pardons. Millions 
wish other millions a Merry Christmas, 

As Christianity advanced, effort was made to determine the date of Christ's birth, 
Different countries and localities were celebrating at different times. One council 
named December 25 as the date, nearly all others agreed. This being near the winter 
solstice, churchmen, very commendably, sought to attach the desirable features of the 
older festival to the newly proclaimed Christmas. They thus adapted the better 
features of the pagan practice. The observance of Christmas has become practically 
universal among both Christians and non-Christians, the latter observing it as a 
season of friendship and socialibility. 

From that time when the day first was called Christmas, beliefs and practices 
have been added, Martin Luther is credited with arranging the first Christmas tree. 
Gustave Koerner, once Governor of Illinois, had the first Illinois tree in his home 
near Belleville, Santa rode a great white horse to distribute gifts in Europe. In 
1C22 the Reverend Clark Moore of Troy, W.Y. wrote the poem, "The Night Before 
Chris tmas, n and Santa has been using reindeer ever since. Firecrackers, once popular 
in southern Illinois, were brought to Net* Orleans by the Italian and Spanish, and 
north to here. 

A thousand or so years ago a maiden hung her wet stockings beside the fire to 
4ry. Santa, scrambling down the chimney, dropped some coins that fell into the 
stockings, and that custom began. Dutch boys and girls use wooden shoes. Carolers 
go about the streets just as they have done for centuries. 



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Many a creche will show the Christ Child, along with wise men and shepherds. 
In 1G97 Virginia O'Hanlon wrote to Francis P. Church, editor of the New York Sun 
and asked, "Is there a Santa Claus?" The editor's reply remains a classic. In 
1846 Sir Richard Cole decided that it would be nice to send a few specially made 
cards at Christmas time. Artist Joseph Cundall drew and colored them. This }^ear 
billions will be sent, bringing joy to about all except the postmen. In 1909 
Pasadena, California, arranged a great public Christmas tree. Many will glow this 
year. 

After remembering Christmases for more than seventy years the day is stocked 
with countless pleasant memories. Ue believe that it is fully justified to be 
sentimental at Chirstmas time; so we* 11 take time out to sit and dream of past 
Christmases and of those to come. Merry Christmas. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



12 - 13 - 62 



Release: IMEDIATE 



Jerry Drennan of Carbondale, a sophomore chemistry student, has been named 
winner of the annual Physics Achievement Award at SIU# 

The award is based on competitive examinations of students in sophomore 
physics classes. Drennan' s prize is a copy of the Handbook of Chemistry and 
Physics, awarded by the Chemical Rubber Company which sponsors the competition. 

Drennan, of 609 McICinley, is a student of Robert Revak, lecturer in physics, 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 






12 - 13 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Fourteen southern Illinois communities have made 
"significant progress" in formation of arts and crafts activities as part of a 
regional ejtperiment in community development, Frank Sehnert, president of the 
Southern Illinois Arts and Crafts Guild and community consultant at Southern Illinois 
University, said today. 

Here is Sehnert' s community-by-community report: 

AVA: The newspaper editor gave the Guild a building which has become the 
community's arts and crafts center. Major crafts there are braided rugs, hooked 
rugs, early American picture frames, corn husk dolls, fancy sun bonnets, wooden 
had-turned box^ls, footstools, and braided or hooked chair seats. 

BROWHFIELD: A center here resulted from the Brownfield-Pope County Art and 
Craft Guild formed in 1957. It has had art classes, and concentrates on leatherwork, 
weaving, rugs, basket work, and aluminum etching. 

MOUNDS -CAIRO: The Ale:;ander-Pulaski Guild acquired a building in 1960, has had 
classes in leather work, knitting, painting, plastics and ceramics. 

COBDEII: The Cobden Crafts Center group has a museum and craft center, with one 
section of the center set aside for selliiig handicraft items. Specialties here 
include wood carvings, cypress-knee lamps, lamp shades made of basket strips, small 
novelty trays and boxes from basket strips. 

PINCKNEYVTLLE: This group chose a center site the first day it met, within a 
week had its center ready. Classes are now being held in leatherwork, knitting, 
hatmaking, chair caning and making candle holders. 

FAIRFIELD: A house has been donated to the group, and classes are held in the 
building. A county-wide exhibit brought more than 100 items, and 300 people attended. 

CARBONDALE: Has had an intensive program in craft classes. Among specialties 
here: candle-making, whittling small animals from twigs, making dried flower 
arrangements, designing Christmas decorations from berries, pine cones, nuts, seed 
pods. Another group has a kiln, is making ceramics products, -more- 






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CROSSVILLE: Has an Egyptian Art School, specialty is sculpturing. Classes in 
painting, textiles and dress designing have been held, 

BEKTOII: One of most recent groups formed, has an active amateur geology club, 
a photography club, and classes for craftsmen. 

ELDORADO: Has the first center established in southern Illinois (1955), and 
a corrugated metal building as its headquarters. Specialties include ceramics, 
weaving, leather work, textile painting. 

ROSICLARE: Has set up a temporary group to plan art and craft activities, 

LATJRENCEVTLLE : Has a new, rapidly-growing center, also to serve as an adult 
education center, has leather and knitting classes meeting regularly, has an 
outstanding lapidary (gem cutter) helping members. 

AMA: Has formed a group known as Little Egypt Art Guild, operating here for 
the past tX70 years, has had two art shows. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



S J) 



12 - 13 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



Attn: Womens Page Editors : 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Protection for the special-diet consumer through 
proper labeling of additives in dietary foods is a vital necessity as the number of 
such additives soars year by year, according to a Southern Illinois University 
home economist. 

Dr. Faith Fenton, visiting professor in the SIU School of Home Economics, 
says industry, government and consumers are pooling their ideas on how to do the job. 

Miss Fenton has returned from Washington, D.C., where she participated in a 
two-day Joint National Conference on Food Additives, sponsored by the Food Law 
Institute, Inc., and the Food and Drug Administration of the U.S. Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare. 

"There are now some 800 different chemical additives being used in foods placed 
before the consuming public," Miss Fenton said. "According to law, these additives 
must be printed on the label unless the food has been standardized. These additives 
include colorings, flavorings, spices, preservatives, emulsifiers, antioxidants and 
others." 

Dietary foods, however, have not been covered by this regulation, she said. 
This includes special foods packaged for infants, the elderly, the person on the 
low-sodium diet, the diabetic diet, the person with an allergy. 

The Washington conference explored this problem as a preliminary to the 
development of regulations acceptable to both the food industry and the Food and 
Drug Administration as well as the consumer. It may be months or even a year or 
two before the proposed regulations are ready for public hearings, however, she said. 

Also considered at the conference was the elimination of "jaw-breaker names" 
for additives and the substitution of common or functional names which would be 
informative to the consumer. 

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"To accomplish this," she said, "the National Research Council of the National 
Academy of Sciences, through its food protection committee, is preparing for early 
publication a Food Chemical Codex, a loose-leaf volume which will help tremendously 
in providing industry, the government and the consumer with identification and 
specifications for the growing list of additives." 

A third encouraging step to benefit the consumer is the proposed development 
of international standards of food labeling, also discussed at the Washington 
conference. A meeting on international standards was held in Switzerland last 
summer, Miss Fen ton said. 

"At present labeling of ingredients is not required in some countries," she 
said. "Development of the European Common Market is going to force standardization, 
I am sure." 

About 200 representatives of industry, government and consumers attended 
the food additive conference. A former southern Illinoisan, William T. Brady, 
president of Corn Products, Inc., is currently chairman of the sponsoring Food 
Law Institute, Inc. Brady is a native of Anna. 



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Dennis Harmon, star defensive halfback for Southern Illinois University's 

Salukis, has been selected as one of a 25-player North all-star squad which 

will face the South in the annual Senior Bowl game at Mobile, Ala., Jan. 5, 

Harmon, a former Watseka prep star, also was an eighth-round draft choice of 

the Chicago Bears. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 12-13-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist J" A, \ 12-13-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY n (LV 

Carbondale, Illinois ^ ' , J!/*^\ 

Phone: 453-2276 ^ ^(^ Release: IMMEDIATE 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Dennis Harmon, standout defensive halfback for 
Southern Illinois University's Salukis this season, has been selected as a member 
of the North all-star squad which will meet the South in the annual Senior Bowl 
game at Mobile, Ala., Jan. 5. 

Harmon, a former all-around prep star at Watseka who was selected by the 
Chicago Bears in the NFL draft, is the third SIU grid star to play in post-season 
all-star games in the past three years. 

Houston Antwine, four-year line star at Southern who graduated two years ago, 
and back Amos Bullocks, who led the Saluki's rushing attack for three years, both 
played in the All-American bowl game at Tucson, Ariz., prior to launching pro 
careers with the Boston Patriots and Dallas Cowboys, respectively. 

In accepting the Senior Bowl offer, Harmon sacrificed his final season of 
track eligibility. A two-year letterman on Coach Lew Hartzog's squad, Harmon 
holds Southern's all-time record in the javelin with a 211-foot throw. However, 
the decision to play in the bowl game was an easy one to make for Harmon. 

"Naturally I'd like to compete in track again next spring, but my right elbow 
has been bothering me this fall and I felt I might have trouble in throwing the 
javelin," Harmon said. "But football is my first love and I'd give up anything 
in order to play in a game like this," 

Employed by Coach Carmen Piccone almost exclusively as a defensive back this 
season, Harmon was credited with only 32 rushing attempts and just 96 yards gained. 
However, he was a leader of Southern's defensive secondary which intercepted 20 
passes this season for a new school record. 

Harmon also was a valued member of Southern's kickoff receiving team. He 
returned 13 kickoff s for 301 yards, an average of 29.3 yards per try, and had 
three returns of more than 50 yards. 

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LIOHS CLUB members of District 1-C have presented a check for $905 to a special 

scholarship fund at Southern Illinois University to aid students training for work 

with retarded children. The money was added to the James H. Stover Memorial 

Scholarship Fund for Retarded Children. Stover, a former district governor of the 

Lions Club from Chester, started the fund in 1956. When he died the fund was named 

in his honor. Since its beginning the fund has aided 31 students with grants from 

the $5,325 collected by the 00 southern Illinois Lions Clubs. Shown during the 

iresentation of Funds to SIU are, left to right, Orville Alexander, chairman of the 

SIU department of government and a member of the Lions Scholarship committee; 

Ellis Mitchell of Carbondale, a member of the Lions committee; Nelson Brockman of 

Breese, chairman of the Lions Scholarship committee; Roger Frey of the SIU special 

education department and Arthur A. Swanson, director of student financial affairs. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 12 - 18 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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MADRIGALS FOR THE MORRISES — After entertaining president and 

Mrs. Delyte W, Morris in their home, the Madrigal Singers of Southern Illinois 

University surround the two for a holiday setting. The singing group, made up 

of University Choir members, specializes in the "round" music of 17th century 

Europe and performs in authentic period costumes. 

PHOTO BY FHOTO SERVICE 12 - 17 - 62 

pUTHERM ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

I'iione: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 






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six) 



From Bill Lyons 12 - 10 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbotidale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Children face an especially dangerous accident 
period the weeks immediately following Christmas, Dr. Frank Bridges of Southern 
Illinois University's Safety Center, warned today. 

One danger area: the child who received a new bicycle. Bridges said in one 
recent year some 360 children under the age of 15 were killed in motor vehicle-bicycle 
accidents, with the injury toll 26,000 and the percentages are increasing yearly. 

Bridges said the principal reason for the high death and injury rate is the 
lack of skill in the use of the bicycle and failure of bike riders to observe 
traffic regulations. 

Youngsters on skates, skis and sleds also show high injury rates due to lack 
of skill, he said. 

Obstruction, suffocation or puncture by objects are other areas of post-Christmas 
danger for children. Bridges said more than 303 recorded cases of this were due 
to parts of toys being caught in the throat and blocking the air passage. Parents 
should inspect the toy chest to make certain broken toys are discarded, he said. 

Two other potential killers that might have been under the Christmas tree, 
he said, are electric trains and chemistry sets. Parents should caution children 
about proper use of any electrical toy, and not to use them with wet hands or if 
v/iring seems frayed. 

"And if a youngster gets a chemistry set for Christmas," he said, "it is 
essential that parents know x*hat each substance is and how it can react. Under 
no circumstances should he be encouraged to mix substances just to see what will 
happen." 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 1G - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



Two members of Southern Illinois University's philosophy department will 
present papers at the annual American Philosophical Association convention, 
Dec. 27 in New York* 

Chairman Willis Moore will read a paper on political philosophy. 
Ceorge ICiuball Plochmann will present a paper titled "Hiccups and other 
Interruptions in Plato's Symposium," 



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ITS JUNE II! DECEMBER as far as summer jobs for Southern Illinois University 

students are concerned. Charles J. Carlsen, assistant supervisor in the student 

work office, is shown explaining the operation of SIU's summer work center to a 

group of students. More than 225 students used the center facilities in the 

first month of operation this year to seek employment for next summer. Listening 

as Carlsen explains how the center aids in finding summer employment are, seated 

left to right, Alice Dahncke, RR. 1, Oakdale and June Wantland, RR.l, Caseyville. 

Standing, left to right are: Helen L. Bevis, 603 Harrison, Mt. Vernon; 

Candace K, Malone, RR.l, Carrier Mills and Helen Heimann, Albers. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 12-17-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



From Bill Lyons 12 - 18 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



A Graphic Arts Center has been developed by the Audio-Visual Aid Service 
at Southern Illinois University to provide University faculty and staff members 
with any kind of illustrative teaching material needed for classroom, off-campus 
or television purposes or for publications. 

Microphotography, charts, transparencies, tape recordings— in fact, any kind 
of photo or graphic art— can be furnished, according to Donald A. Ingli, director 



of the service. 



The canter is supervised by Zuleiman D. Zalatimo, lecturer in audio-visual 
aids. 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 1C - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Releases IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Off-campus credit courses will be started early in 
January in six southern Illinois communities by the Extension Division of Southern 
Illinois University, Raymond H. Dey, director, has announced. 

A number of 16-week courses started in the fall are still underway and another 
group will be started early in February. 

New winter quarter courses scheduled, together with the instructor's name, 
time and place of the first class meeting, are as follows: 

ANNA— "Introduction to Drama," Thomas Cassidy, 7 p.m., Jan. 0, Anna State 
Hospital. 

BENTON— "Usage in English, ,? Lewis Hilliard, 7 p.m., Jan, 3, high school. 

CAIRO— "The American Educational Systems," Thomas Gwaltney, 7 p.m., Jan. 0, 
high school. 

EAST ST. LOUIS— "Methods of Teaching Trade and Technical Subjects," Wayne Ramp, 
5:30 p.m., Jan. G, Room 116, E. St. Louis Center. 

ELIZABETHTOUN— "Introduction to Modern Literature," Joe Leonard, 7 p.m., 
Jan. 7, grade school. 

MCLEANS BORO— "Art Education," staff, 6:30 p.m., Jan. 7, West Side grade school. 

In addition, two General Studies courses will be offered at Menard State 
Penetentiary, Chester. One, "English Composition," will be taught by Leon Bennett, 
starting at 12 noon Jan. 2, while Carl Schweinfurth will teach "Man and Culture in 
Time and Space," second course, starting at 12 noon Jan. 7. 

All of the courses starting in January provide three quarter hours credit. 



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Decorating the Chrstmas tree is a serious business for nursery school 

children in the child development laboratory operated by the School of Home 

Economics at Southern Illinois University. Left to right are: David Mueller, son 

of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mueller; Allen Carrier, son of Mr. and Mrs. ileil Carrier; 

Cindy Butler, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Boyd Butler; Ray Gruny, son of Mr. and Mrs. 

Charles Gruny; David Paper, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Paper; and Sumi Koshiko, 

daughter of Mr. and Mrs, Michael Hoshiko. 

PEOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 12-18-62 

SOUTHER!! ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 












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From Bill Lyons ^ r 12 - 13 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY b / 

Carbondale, Illinois \\ 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — The Museum Shop at Southern Illinois University 
has stocked gift items for children this year and is doing a thriving Christmas 
trade, according to William L. Johnson, museum preparator who supervises the 
shop . 

Miniature antiques of cast iron, shell, feathers and other materials, electronic 
devices, dolls from foreign lands, games, birds and animals appeal to youngsters, 
ha said. 

Imported items from all parts of the world are available for adults: a string 
of carved camels from Israel, made of olive wood; fish floats from Japan; brass 
art objects from India; a wood Madonna from Italy; a ceramic Madonna from West 
Germany; "The Praying Hands" in ceramic from West Germany; onyx bookends from 
Mexico; a Kashmir boat from India. 

The Museum Shop is entirely self-supporting, Johnson said, and proceeds from 
aales pay the salaries of the two students, Don George of Carbondale and 
Leo Barczewski of Richview, who operate it. 



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From Bill Lyons r 12 - 1C - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Thirty children, two to five years of age— most of 
them offspring of faculty members or graduate students--are "laboratory specimens" 
for Southern Illinois University home economics students preparing to be teachers. 

In the child development laboratory, directed by Michael Zunich, the students 
first observe then actually work with the children to gain first-hand experience 
in child care and development and in techniques of teaching pre-school children. 

They conduct story- telling sessions, provide educational games and activities 
designed to develop the children's skills in handicrafts, bring animals to broaden 
their knowledge of nature, take them on field trips on the campus and to community 
points of interest, supervise their refreshment and rest periods, wipe drippy 
noses, referee disagreements and in general fulfill the dual role of stand-in mother 
and teacher, 

Among the field trips often taken are visits to the University Museum and the 
campus greenhouse, to the railroad station and the fire station. 

"It's a moot question," says Zunich, "which learn the most— the children or 
the students." 

Each season brings its oim theme for nursery school and kindergarten activities— 
flowers in the early spring, bunnies at Easter, goblins at Hallow'een, turkeys at 
xhanks giving— and of course decorated trees and Santa Claus at Christmas. 

East student must develop his or her own special projects to introduce to the 
children, all of which must contribute to the youngsters' learning process. 

Two graduate students— Mrs. Elizabeth Loomis of Carbondale and June Roush of 
Point Pleasant, W.Va.— serve as teachers in the child development laboratory. 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist ' 12 - 1G - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Southern Illinois University has accepted an 
invitation to become a member of the Central Collegiate Conference, a move which 
is expected to add prestige to the Saluki's track and field schedule which already 
is one of the finest in the country. 

Coach Lew Hartzog's club, which has competed as a guest entry in recent CCC 
outdoor meets, will join such prominent track powers as Western Michigan, Michigan 
State, Notre Dame, Drake, Wheaton, Central Michigan and Loyola in the league. 

The conference, which sponsors only indoor and outdoor track and field meets 
and annual cross country meets, extended the membership invitation to SIU recently 
and officially notified Athletic Director Donald N. Boydston of its formal 
acceptance this week. 

Southern was second to Kansas in the CCC cross country meet a year ago and 
last spring finished fourth behind Western Michigan, Notre Dame and Kansas in the 
group's outdoor track meet. The Saluki's three ail-American runners, Jim Dupree, 
Bill Cornell and Brian Turner, all set meet records, however, when they turned in 
clockings of 1:50.1, 4:06,2 and 14:14.8 in the one-half mile, mile and three-mile 
runs, respectively. 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 1C - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 



Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release )IATI 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — President Delyte W. Morris of Southern Illinois 
University will discuss problems in multiple campus administration at a January 16 
meeting of the Association of American Colleges, at Atlantic City, 17. J. 

A special workshop on multiple campuses will be a feature of the annual 
meeting of the Association. "The establishment, administration and maintenance of 
standards on multiple campuses or branches is one of the most important problems 
facing higher education," said Chairman pro tem Peter Sammartino, president of 
Farleigh Dickinson University, in his invitation to Dr. Morris. 

Participating with Morris and Sammartino in the special session panel will be 
Kenneth E. Clark, liberal arts and sciences dean of the University of Colorado; 
Albert C. Gubitz, dean of Ohio University; Herman T. Spieth, chancellor of the 
University of California at Riverside; and Alfred D. Donovan, vice president of 
Seton Hall University. 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 1G - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY /D //* ~f~/ A / 1 <- 

Carbondale, Illinois djtSfrf *> 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec, — Seemingly more effective against major basketball 
opponents, Southern Illinois University's Salukis are looking forward to meeting 
their third of the season Saturday night when they challenge Western Michigan 
at Kalamazoo, 

Coach Jack Hartman's veteran SIU club has tripped twice over lesser opponents, 
but has scored impressive wins over St, Bonaventure and Oklahoma while retaining 
its hold on a top ten berth in national college-division cage rankings, 

"We have a little trouble in getting up mentally for clubs which we know we 
should be able to handle," Hartman said, "However, that shouldn't be any problem 
this weekend when we face Western Michigan because we know they have a real fine 
outfit." 

Prior to meeting the Broncos, Southern will host North Dakota State Thursday 
night in an inter sectional game which could produce the Saluki*s fourth win as 
compared to two setbacks, 

Dave Henson, SIU co-captain, continues to lead his teammates in scoring with 
71 points while Paul Henry and Lou Williams follow with 62 and 45 points, respectively 



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From Bill Lyons / j 12-18-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY _S"jZ <£{ ' ( f (J 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 / * Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — A Southern Illinois University researcher reports 
he has induced ulcers in rats by giving them doses of caffeine amounting to about 
half that in a cup of coffee. 

George Gass, associate professor of physiology, administered caffeine to 
the laboratory rats through stomach tubes. The animals developed stomach ulcers 
within four days, chased their tails and became so excited they chewed on their 
own hind feet. 

Gass described his studies in the Canadian Journal of Biochemistry in a 
research article co-authored xalth Carl J. Pfeiffer of Quincy (34 Lincoln Hill), 
a graduate assistant in Gass* Endocrinologic Pharmacology Research Laboratory. 
Gass has been studying the ulcer-producing effects of adrenal corticoids in 
combination with other drugs. 

Earlier research with guinea pigs and cats showed that stomach ulcers occurred 
after concentrated doses of caffeine alkaloids. Gass is now trying to find out 
what chemical mechanism in caffeine causes ulcers. 



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From Bill Lyons U . / ||) 12-10-62 

SOUTHERN ILLIIIOIS UNIVERSITY ^ ^ (,( ' 

Carbondale, Illinois -^ ^ 

Phone: 453-2276 . 1 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBOHDALE, ILL. , Dec. — Some 30 foreign students attending Southern Illinois 
University will get an inside look at the American way of life by visiting in 
Chicago area homes during the Christmas holiday. 

The Foreign Student Office at SIU has arranged for the visits through the 
International Hospitality Center of (116 S. Michigan Ave.) and the American 
Foundation of (203 N. Wabash) Chicago. 

Some of the visits will be for Christmas Day only and others will include 
home stays of up to eight days, Mrs, Mary U. Hake land, assistant foreign student 
adviser, said. 

To smooth the way for students and host families the students at SIU fill out 
forms listing their interests, diet restrictions and other data. The Chicago 
agencies use these hospitality forms to arrange visits with families having 
similar interests. 

Mrs. Wakeland said the International Hospitality Center maintains an "open 
house" throughout the holidays for foreign student visitors, arranging tours, 
providing guides and information on special events and sights in the Windy City, 

The American Foundation for World Youth Understanding sets up eight-day visits 
in homes for selected foreign students. 

Included in the international students from SIU who will visit the Chicago 
area are 13 from Vietnam and others from Korea, Free China, Germany, Philippines, 
India, Pakistan, Africa, Venezuela, Thailand and England. 



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From Fred Huff, Sports Publicist ^T////'^ 12 - 18 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois ^ -%^- c~ J^J<' i tfd ? / -■ 

Phone: 453-2276 cT* Release: IMMEDIATE 



fcjfl^t L 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Five new opponents, including three major teams, 
Tulsa, Toledo and Louisville, appear on Southern Illinois University's 1963 
football schedule released today by Athletic Director Donald N. Boydston. 

Tulsa, 1962 champion of the Missouri Valley Conference and Bowling Green 
State University (Ohio), Mid-American titlist, are top clubs on the 10-game card 
which Boydston calls, "the toughest Southern has ever encountered in football." 

In addition to the majors, Southern will meet nearby Evansville (Ind.) 
College and distant North Dakota State next fall when it hopes to improve on this 
year's 4-6 record. 

Completing the Salulci's 1963 schedule will be games with holdovers Ft. 
Campbell, Northern Michigan, North Te::as State and Lincoln University of Jefferson 
City, Mo. Ft. Campbell won the Missile Bowl service championship this year while 
North Texas was runnerup behind Tulsa in the Missouri Valley. 

Southern's complete schedule follows: 

Sept. 21, at Evansville College; Sept. 20, Bowling Green, home; Oct. 5, at 
Louisville; Oct. 12, Lincoln, home; Oct. 19, Northern Michigan, home; Oct. 26, 
Ft. Campbell, home; Nov. 2, at Tulsa; Nov. 9, North Dakota State, home; Nov. 16, 
at Toledo; Nov. 23, at North Texas State. 



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The Carbondale Rotarian 

bondale Rotary Club Meets Every Wednesday Noon at the Elks Club 

Charter Club No. 743 - May I. 1920 
VOL. 5 NO. 23 "" December 17, 1962 

H E K R ¥ CHRISTMAS 



"He lived Christ's gospel truly every day, 
He taught his flock and preached what Christ had said. 
And even though his parish was widespread 
With farms remote, and houses far asunder, 
He never stopped for rain or even for thunder; 
But visited each home where trouble came, 
The rich or poor to him were all the same." 

—Prologue to Canterbury Tales. 

IN THIS OLD FASHIONED GREETING is our sincere wish for a joyous Christmas. We do not 
know of anyone who has expressed the spirit of Christmas better-- -or who has summed up 
so well the true spirit of Rotary than Chaucer. 

THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT certainly was evidenced last Thursday night at the Rotary Christmas 
party in the ball room of the SIU unxversity Center. It was the biggest Christmas 
party since the memory of this reporter runneth not to the contrary— some 270 Rotarians 
Rotary-Anns and foreign students filled the beautifully decorated ball room with the 
chipaos, saris and other exotic costumes of our guests lending an international flavor 
to the occasion. We were happy to have with us District Governor Norman Beck and 
Mayor Blaney Miller of Carbondale. There was a message from President Delyte W. Morris, 
of SIU, extending the greetings of the university and saluting Rotary for its assist- 
ance to higher education and its leadership for world peace. 

FORTIETH ANNIVERSARY ; Adding significance to the occasion was the fact that it was 
the fortieth anniversary of the chartering of both the Herrin and the Murphysboro 
tlubs, both sponsored by the Carbondale club. President John Reed of the Herrin Club 
and President Henry Rehming of the Murphysboro club headed large groups of members 
and Rotary- Anns and both spoke briefly. 



jpB}S[j!p^ '3J[iassoj3 — SuiuaAg Anpijg 

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smog -js 'sipdojjajAj 'uoubjaj '3[iiA3DU3JA\Eg 'ppiJJiBg 's^ijb^ 'buuv — uoojsi ABpsjnqg 

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jjojjiuejg Jssaa 'BUBqjQ 'uoaiaA ')Vt 'opEJopjg *oSeoiq3 '9jnA3[i3g 'uofqjv — uoon ABpssnx 

UI3 I B S 'A\ 'siHAAau^ouij 'Aaiqo 'puuvj jjaj 'BpuoojoQ 'Sjnqaajg 'Biquirqoo 'susi3 'j3}S3q3 '0JIB3 — SuiusAg Xspuopy 

uo[[Bj t o 'susqjy a\3M 'uijjsh 'SjnqsujBH 'Bipyju^o — uoojs[ A~Epuojv 

— SONI133JV AHVXOH V3HV 

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Ajbjouoh (sp^ID) g apAo 'qjiuis ' 'ajss ojui — -npg One) 'H nreifliApsuoAq 

Ajbjouoh (<1!0) "O 'H 'zjuag uisqBUJnof — Tipg - ("HH) "8. P-iba\oh 'Suog 

Ajbjouoh (Xo-jj) ;a Ao>£ 'uopjof aoiAJss — uoisiAapg (Snoa) a M '^1. 

Ajbjouoh ( u qof) '^ uqof 'aSpoH 'jdns atq — -dsuBjg y^ , (Ajjbh) Ajjbh. 'souoo^f 

AJBJOUOH (UUOC^ TT UUOr 'inn lTinniTTT3Ar>r\ -nn-n VvmiJl —i vnuu '^tanSim-wr 



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The Carbondale Rotarion 

Irbondale Rotary Club Mcets Every Wednesday Noon at the Elks Club 

Charter Club No. 743 - May I, 1920 

*-~VUCT5 NO. 23 ■ 



December 17, 1962 



Morrit 



' H t, R K Y CHRISTMAS 

"He lived Christ's gospel truly every day, 
He taught his flock and preached what Christ had said. 
And even though his parish was widespread 
With farms remote, and houses far asunder, 
He never stopped for rain or even for thunder; 
But visited each home where trouble came, 
The rich or poor to him were all the same." 

—Prologue to Canterbury Tales. 

IN THIS OLD FASHIONED GREETING is our sincere wish for a joyous Christmas. We do not 
know of anyone who has expressed the spirit of Christmas better-or who has summed up 
so well the true spirit of Rotary than Chaucer. 

THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT certainly was evidenced last Thursday night at the Rotary Christmas 
party in the ball room of the SIU university Center. It was the biggest Christmas 
party since the memory of this reporter runneth not to the contrary-some 270 Rotarians 
Rotary-Anns and foreign students filled the beautifully decorated ball room with the 
chipaos, saris and other exotic costumes of our guests lending an international flavor 
to the occasion. We were happy to have with us District Governor Norman Beck and 
Mayor Blaney Miller of Carbondale. There was a message from President Delyte W. Morr 
of SIU, extending the greetings of the university and saluting Rotary for its assist- 
ance to higher education and its leadership for world peace. 

FORTIETH ANNIVERSARY: Adding significance to the occasion was the fact that it was 
the fortieth anniversary of the chartering of both the Herrin and the Murphysboro 
clubs, both sponsored by the Carbondale club. President John Reed of the Herrin Club 
and President Henry Rehming of the Murphysboro club headed large groups of members 
and Rotary- Anns and both 6poke briefly. 

A SPIN OF THE ROTARY WHEEL for Col. Alexander MacMillan and his fine committee for 
their outstanding job in arranging the party from the handsome programs in two colors 
to the glamorous corsages for the ladies. And a special salute to our foreign guests 
who entertained us with songs and dances from their native lands. 

■■lA.yBE |J t S SANTA. Wednesday noon we return to the Elks Club for the regular weekly 
meeting. Program chairman H. R. Long reports that the speaker for the occasion is a 
closely guarded secret, which may mean he has signed up Santa for the occasion. 

.DON'T FORGET the search of Henry Rehn's Buyer-Seller-Competitor-Relations Committee 
tor the most courteous salesman— or woman in the Carbondale area. Each of us is urged 
to nominate our favorite sales person and the winner will be honored at a meeting 
sometime in January. 

1MUJPS: Willis Swartz visited the Murphysboro club on November 27. Carl Parrish made 
«P at the Anna-Jonesboro club and Byron Kimmel and Phil Kimmel visited the West 
Frankfort club on different Mondays. Visitors at the Herrin club included Frank Gumm, 
Willis Swartz and Herb Settle. "Tinner" Eddings made up at Murphysboro and Dr. E.L. 
Sederlin visited the Zeigler club. 

iEDICATIOM wtws as the Weekly Letter of the Rotary Club of Morris, N.Y. points out; 
Founded in 1905, Rotary has been unfolding and developing for 57 years. Rotary is a 
Series of dreams, hopes, ideals and aspirations transmitted into a series of 
achievements. It is what it is today because dedicated and competent leaders have kept 
It going even when conditions of weariness and monotony, discouragement snd disllluison- 
ment would have made it easy to quit." 

SPEAKING of INTERNATTOMAt, activities, and the Carbondale club has an outstanding 
record in this respect, there is an interesting article in the January Rotarian on 
tr.e world's first INTERACT Club—Rotary's new plan for international action clubs 
"•r young men. You won't want to miss this one. 



" 



Service CfLve Self- 3L (Profits Mod QYL Serves 3esl 



CARBONDALE ROTARY CLUB — 1962-63 



VICE-PRESIDENT 

Max Sappen field 



GOVERNOR DIST. 651 PRESIDENT 

Norman Beck Tom Easterly 

DIRECTORS: Frank Gumm, Ken Miller, Max Sappenfield, Bob Vokac 
PAST DISTRICT GOVERNOR: Lester Webb PAST PRESIDENT: Harry Goldstein 



SECRETARY-TREASUR 

Jim Mowry 



COMMITTEES 



CLUB SERVICE 

Max Sappenfield, Director 
ATTENDANCE 

Bryan Kimmel, Chairman 
CLASSIFICATION 

Carl Birkholz, Chairman 
CLUB BULLETIN 

Bill Lyons, Chairman 
FELLOWSHIP - 
SERG EANT-AT-ARMS 

John Q. Clark, Chairman 
MAGAZINE - 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Roye Bryant, Chairman 
MEMBERSHIP ■- ' 

Clyde Winkler, Chairman • 
PROGRAM 

Max Sappenfield, Chairman 
AUDITING 

W. B. Crane, Jr., Chairman 
MUSIC 

George Hand, Chairman 
LEGISLATION 

Herb Settle, Chairman 
HISTORY 

John Allen, Chairman 



Name Nickname 

Abbott, Talbert W. (Abbott) 
Adams, George W. (George) 
Armstrong, John M. (John) 
Birkholz, Carl K. (Carl) 
Bryant, Roye R. (Roye) 
Budslick, William (Bill) 
Bushee, Ralph W. (Ralph) 
Campisi, Paul J. (Paul) 
Clark, John Q. (John) 
Clayton, Charles C. (Charley) 
Crane, William B., Jr. (Bill) 
Crocker, D. R. (Don) 
Curtis, Harry C. (Harry) 
Easterly, Thomas A. (Tom) 
Eddings, W. L. (Tinner) 
Feirich, Charles E. (Charley) 
Fisher, Harvey I. (Harvey) 
Frazer, C. A. (C.A.) 
Gallington, Ralph O. (Ralph) 
Goldstein, Harry S. (Golde) 
Gray, Ralph (Ralph) 
Gumm, Frank L. (Frank) 
Hamblen, John W. (John) 
Hand, George H. (George) 
Hoffman, Paul M. (Paul) 
Hosley, Neil W. (Neil) 
Joseph, R. C. (Joe) 
Keith, Malcolm Robert (Bob) 
Kimmel, Bryan (Bryan) 
Kimmel, Philip (Phip) 



VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

Frank Gumm, Director 
BUYER-SELLER- 
COMPETITOR-RELATIONS 

Henry J. Rehn, Chairman 
EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE 
RELATIONS 
* Curt Mann, Chairman 
FOUR WAY TEST & 
COMMUNITY 
GOVERNMENT 

Mason Parker, Chairman 
OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Neil Hosley, Chairman - 



COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Kenneth Miller, Director 
YOUTH 

Paul Hoffman, Chairman 
COMMUNITY SAFETY 

James Wallace, Chairman 

crippled Children 

Don Crocker, Chairman 
SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS & 
STUDENT LOANS ; 

Frank Klingberg, Chairman 
STUDENT GUESTS 

Chuck Solithard, Chairman 
INTER-SERVICE 
CLUB MEETINGS 

A. R. MacMillan, Chairman 



• - ■ 



! 



ROSTER 



Membership or Classification 

Senior Active 

Edu. — History 

Gas & Oil Wholesaling 

Art Goods — Retailing 

Senior Active 

Motor Courts 

Edu. — Library 

Edu. — Sociology 

Edu. — High School Principal 

Edu. — Journal Publishing 

Accounting Service 

Christianity — Prostestantism 

Senior Active 

Decorating materials — Retailing 

Heating Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Zoology 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Industrial Education 

Men's Furnishings — Retailing 

Real Estate Agency 

Associations — YMCA Director 

Edu. — Computing Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Marketing 

Edu. — Forestry 

R.R. Transp. — Dispatching 

Plastics — Mfg. 

Petroleum — Production 

Taxi Service 



Name Nickname 

Mann, Curt F. (Curt) 
Mars, John T. (John) 
McKeefery, William J. (Bill) 
McRoy, Paul F. (Paul) 
Miller, Kenneth R. (Ken) 
Mowry, James B. (Jim) 
Murray, Glen H. (Glen) 
Murrie, B. J. (B.J.) 
Nagel, William E. (Bill) 
Neunlist, Dempsey V. (D.V.) 
Parker, H. M. (Mason) 
Parrish, Carl A. (Cap) 
Parrish, Gordon A. (Gordon) 
Pulley, Charles (Charles) . 
Rehn, Henry J. (Henry) 
Renfro, Louis F. (L.F.) 
Sappenfield, Max M. (Max) 
Sederlin, Elvin L. (E.L.) 
Semar, Preston 
Settle, Herbert B. (Herb) 
Southard, Charles (Chuck) 
Stafford, Eugene (Gene) 
Swartz, Willis G. (Bill) 
Swick, Ralph D. (Ralph) 
Veath, Irose J. (I. J.) 
Vokac, Robert B. (Bob) 
Wiegand, G. Carl (Carl) 
Winkler, Clyde V. (Clyde) 
Allen, John W. (John) 
Davis, Robert W., (Bob) 



INTERNATIONAL SERV1 

Robert Vokac, Director 
INTERNATIONAL 
CONTACTS 

Howard Long, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Paul Campisi, Chairman 
ROTARY FOUNDATION 

Wilis Swartz, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
STUDENT PROJECTS 

Ralph Bushee, Chairman 



Membership or Classificati 

Men's Clothing — Retailin 

Banking — Savings 

Edu. — Admin. Acad. Al 

Broadcasting Services 

Edu. — University Admin. 

Horticulture — Research 

House Furniture — Retaili 

Building Construction 

Edu. — Tech. Adult Edu. 

Comercial Photography 

Elec. Light & Power Servic 

Insurance — Life 

Milk — Distributing 

Edu. — Architectural Servi 

Edu. — School of Business 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Government 

Public Health 

Loans — Auto Financing 

Highway Eng. Utilities 

Edu. — Student Counselin 

Ins. — Health and Hospital 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Accounting 

Sporting Goods — ' Retailin 

Edu. i — Placements 

Edu. — Economics 

Past Service 

Honorary 

Honorary 



</ C C /? L 



From Bill Lyons 12 - 17 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



An indefinite sick leave has been granted to Charles Foote, professor of 
zoology at Southern Illinois University. Foote has been undergoing treatment 
for a blood and kidney disorder. 

An embryologist, Foote has been a member of the SIU faculty since 1947. He 
has been granted two leaves for advanced research in sex differentiation at the 
Stra?.geways Research Laboratory, Cambridge, England, and at the Laboratory of 
Sa:bryology of the College of France. Foote 's wife, Florence, has been associated 
with him in his research. 

Fooce has been replaced with the teaching services of two doctoral degree 
students in zoology, Walter Wilhelm and Charles L. Smith. 



-pb- 



CARBONDALE ROTARY CLUB — 1962-63 

GOVERNOR DIST. 651 PRESIDENT VICE-PRESIDENT 

Norman Beck Tom Easterly Max Sappenfield 

DIRECTORS: Frank Gumm, Ken Miller, Max Sappenfield, Bob Vokac 
PAST DISTRICT GOVERNOR: Lester Webb PAST PRESIDENT: Harry Goldstein 

COMMITTEES 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 
Jim Mowry 



CLUB SERVICE 

Max Sappenfield, Director 
ATTENDANCE 

Bryan Kimmel, Chairman 
CLASSIFICATION 

Carl Birkholz, Chairman 
CLUB BULLETIN 

Bill Lyons, Chairman 
FELLOWSHIP - 
SERGEANT-AT-ARMS 

John Q. Clark, Chairman 
MAGAZINE - 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Roye Bryant, Chairman 
MEMBERSHIP ' 

Clyde Winkler, Chairman 
PROGRAM 

Max Sappenfield, Chairman 
AUDITING 

W. B. Crane, Jr., Chairman 
MUSIC 

George Hand, Chairman 
LEGISLATION 

Herb Settle, Chairman 
HISTORY 

John Allen, Chairman 



Name Nickname 

Abbott, Talbert W. (Abbott) 
Adams, George W. (George) 
Armstrong, John M. (John) 
Birkholz, Carl K. (Carl) 
Bryant, Roye R. (Roye) 
Budslick, William (Bill) 
Bushee, Ralph W. (Ralph) 
Campisi, Paul J. (Paul) 
Clark, John Q. (John) 
Clayton, Charles C. (Charley) 
Crane, William B., Jr. (Bill) 
Crocker, D. R. (Don) 
Curtis, Harry C. (Harry) 
Easterly, Thomas A. (Tom) 
Eddings, W. L. (Tinner) 
Feirich, Charles E. (Charley) 
Fisher, Harvey I. (Harvey) 
Frazer, C. A. (C.A.) 
Gallington, Ralph O. (Ralph) 
Goldstein, Harry S. (Golde) 
Gray, Ralph (Ralph) 
Gumm, Frank L. (Frank) 
Hamblen, John W. (John) 
Hand, George H. (George) 
Hoffman, Paul M. (Paul) 
Hosley, Neil W. (Neil) 
Joseph, R. C. (Joe) 
Keith, Malcolm Robert (Bob) 
Kimmel, Bryan (Bryan) 
Kimmel, Philip (Phip) 
Klingberg, Frank L. (Frank) 
Koonce, Harry (Harry) 
Lee, W. D. (Doug) 
Long, Howard R. (H.R.) 
Lyons. William H. (Bill) 
MacMillan. Alexander R. (Mac) 



VOCATIONAL SERVICE 

Frank Gumm, Director 
BUYER-SELLER- 
COMPETITOR-RELATIONS 

Henry J. Rehn, Chairman 
EMPLOYER-EMPLOYEE 
RELATIONS 
' Curt Mann, Chairman 
FOUR WAY TEST & 
COMMUNITY 
GOVERNMENT 

Mason Parker, Chairman 
OCCUPATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Neil Hosley, Chairman 



COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Kenneth Miller, Director 
YOUTH 

Paul Hoffman, Chairman 
COMMUNITY SAFETY 

James Wallace, Chairman 
CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

Don Crocker, Chairman 
SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS & 
STUDENT LOANS 1 

Frank Klingberg, Chairman 
STUDENT GUESTS 

Chuck Southard, Chairman 
INTER-SERVICE 
CLUB MEETINGS 

A. R. MacMillan. Chairman 



\3 ' 






ROSTER 



Membership or Classification 

Senior Active 

Edu. — History 

Gas & Oil Wholesaling 

Art Goods — Retailing 

Senior Active 

Motor Courts 

Edu. — Library 

Edu. — Sociology 

Edu. — High School Principal 

Edu. — Journal Publishing 

Accounting Service 

Christianity — Prostestantism 

Senior Active 

Decorating materials — Retailing 

Heating Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Zoology 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Industrial Education 

Men's Furnishings — Retailing 

Real Estate Agency 

Associations — YMCA Director 

Edu. — Computing Service 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Marketing 

Edu. — Forestry 

R.R. Transp. — Dispatching 

Plastics — Mfg. 

Petroleum — Production 

Taxi Service 

Edu. — Government 

R.R. Transp. — Div. Supt. 

Television — Service 

Edu. — Journalism 

Edu. — Info. Serv. 

Edu. — Transportation 



INTERNATIONAL SERVICE 

Robert Vokac, Director 
INTERNATIONAL 
CONTACTS 

Howard Long, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
INFORMATION 

Paul Campisi, Chairman 
ROTARY FOUNDATION 

Wilis Swartz, Chairman 
INTERNATIONAL 
STUDENT PROJECTS 

Ralph Bushee, Chairman 



Name Nickname 

Mann, Curt F. (Curt) 
Mars, John T. (John) 
McKeefery, William J. (Bill) 
McRoy, Paul F. (Paul) 
Miller, Kenneth R. (Ken) 
Mowry, James B. (Jim) 
Murray, Glen H. (Glen) 
Mu'rrie, B. J. (B.J.) 
Nagel, William E. (Bill) 
Neunlist, Dempsey V. (DA'.) 
Parker, H. M. (Mason) 
Parrish, Carl A. (Cap) 
Parrish, Gordon A. (Gordon) 
Pulley, Charles (Charles) , 
Rehn, Henry J. (Henry) 
Renfro, Louis F. (L.F.) 
Sappenfield, Max M. (Max) 
Sederlin, Elvin L. (E.L.) 
Semar, Preston 
Settle, Herbert B. (Herb) 
Southard, Charles (Chuck) 
Stafford, Eugene (Gene) 
Swartz, Willis G. (Bill) 
Swick, Ralph D. (Ralph) 
Veath, Irose J. (I. J.) 
Vokac, Robert B. (Bob) 
Wiegand, G. Carl (Carl) 
Winkler, Clyde V. (Clyde) 
Allen, John W. (John) 
Davis, Robert W., (Bob) 
Dill, John D. (John) 
Hodge, John R. (John) 
Jordon, Roy V.' (Roy) 
Lentz, E. G. (Gib) 
Smith, Clyde L. (Clyde) 



Membership or Classification 

Men's Clothing — Retailing 

Banking — Savings 

Edu. — Admin. Acad. Affairs 

Broadcasting Services 

Edu. — University Admin. 

Horticulture — Research 

House Furniture — Retailing 

Building Construction 

Edu. — Tech. Adult Edu. 

Comercial Photography 

Elec. Light & Power Service 

Insurance — Life 

Milk — Distributing 

Edu. — Architectural Service 

Edu. — School of Business 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Government 

Public Health 

Loans — Auto Financing 

Highway Eng. Utilities 

Edu. — Student Counseling 

Ins. — Health and Hospital 

Senior Active 

Edu. — Accounting 

Sporting Goods — ' Retailing 

Edu. ' — Placements 

Edu. — Economics 

Past Service 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary 

Honorary . 






AREA ROTARY MEETINGS— 

Monday Noon — Cqntiialia, Harrisburg, Herrin, New Athens, O'FaJlon 

Monday Evening — Cairo, Chester, Cisne, Columbia, Freeburg, Golconda, Mt. Carmel, Olney, Pinckneyville, W. Salem 

Tuesday Noon — Albion, Belleville, Chicago, Eldorado, Mt. Vernon, Urbana, West Frankfort 

Tuesday Evening — Benton, Carmi, DuQuoin, Flora, Murphysboro, Sparta, Waterloo, Wayne City ' 

Wednesday Noon — Carbondale, East St. Louis, Johnston City, Lebanon 

Thursday Noon — ■ Anna, Carlyle, Fairfield, Lawrence ville, Marion, Metropolis, St. Louis 

Thursday Evening — Marissa, Mascoutah, Nashville, Zeigler 

Friday Noon — Louisville, Salem 

Friday Evening — Crossville, Millstadt 



/. C C fl <L 



From Bill Lyons 12 - 17 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



An indefinite sick leave has been granted to Charles Foote, professor of 
zoology at Southern Illinois University. Foote has been undergoing treatment 
for a blood and kidney disorder. 

An embryologist, Foote has been a member of the SIU faculty since 1947. He 
has been granted two leaves for advanced research in sex differentiation at the 
Strangeways Research Laboratory, Cambridge, England, and at the Laboratory of 
Embryology of the College of France. Foote' s wife, Florence, has been associated 
with him in his research, 

Foote has been replaced with the teaching services of two doctoral degree 
students in zoology, Walter Wilhelm and Charles L. Smith. 



-pb- 



From Bill Lyons 12-15-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2275 Release: IMMEDIATE 

SIXT HEWS SUMMARY 
FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION 

College graduates becoming teachers at all levels are getting more money and 
the demand remains constant and heavy according to Dr. Roye Bryant, director of 
Southern Illinois University's Placement Service. His annual report shows 1962 
graduates found an increased demand for high school and junior college teachers. 
Average salary paid college degree beginning elementary teachers was 4 thousand 
6 hundred 70 dollars— up 3 and a half per cent over 1961. Degree holders starting 
at high schools got an average of 4 thousand 7 hundred 58 dollars, also a 3 ana a half 
jper cent increase. Average pay for beginning teachers with masters degrees with 
|5 thousand, 6 hundred 27 dollars at the elementary level— about the same as last 
year— »ar.d 5 thousand 6 hundred and 63 dollars at the high school level— up 2 and a 
half per cent Bryant said 49 per cent of SIU's graduates teaching school this 
year accepted positions in southern Illinois. 

* * * 

While snowf lakes filled the air, a crew of S-I-U researchers were busily planti*^; 
ILsh in a strip mine pit near DeSoto. Forty channel catfish weighing more than 
|2 pounds apiece were given a new home in the pond and laboratory director 
iiJilliam Lewis hopes they will spawn nesct spring and pilot a fish raising industry 
p:u southern Illinois. Catfish farming, says Lewis, is a big thing in Arkansas and 
sssouri but it hasn't been exploited in Illinois. Previous experiments have been 
•' >uducted in the strip mine pits with rainbow trout and sruailmouth bass. 

* * * 

Completion of the 3 hundred and 10 thousand dollar Wesley Foundation building 

"ujacent to the Southern Illinois University campus is close at hand. The Rev. 

jfonald Seibert, foundation director, says the interior of the north wing soon will be 

completed. The Wesley Foundation serves as a center for spiritual, cultural and 

social activities for Methodist students attending S-I-U. Funds for the building are 

:>eir.g provided from the Methodist Festival of Sharing program and the foundation's 
efforts among alumni. * * * 



Fourteen southern Illinois communities have made significant progress in 
formation of arts and crafts activities according to Frank Sehnert (SEE-MERT) , S-I-U 
faculty member and president of the Southern Illinois Arts and Crafts Guild. 
writing in the current Community Development Newsletter he says programs are in 
various stages of development at Ava, Brownfield, Mounds, Cairo, Cobden, Pinckneyvillc 
7airfield 3 Carbondale, Crossville, Benton, Eldorado, Rosiclare, Lawrenceville, and 
Anna. 

* * * 

Southern Illinois University students wanting summer vacation jobs that offer 
fun and even adventure are visiting a special room maintained at the student work 
program office. Here Director Frank Adams keeps a file of dude ranches, hotels and 
.. ^sorts that employ college students to help with their summer vacation guests. 

* * * 

Ten new graduate fellowships worth a mimimum of 6 thousand 6 hundred dollars 
3piece have been announced by Southern Illinois University. They are paid by the 
National Defense Education Act. Five are in English, 3 in psychology and 2 in 
elementary education. 






. 



, 



No. 456 December 15, 1962 

S> I. E. A. HEW SLITTER 

VERNE B. JOY , publisher of the CENTRALIA EVENING SENTINEL and past president of just 
about every newspaperman's organization in Illinois, observed his 36th birthday 
Dec. 12. He was sporting a bandaged wrist and patch of plaster on his nose, the 
result of a fall in the back yard at his home, and wondering if it would prevent him 
from attending the Sentinel's annual Christmas party. For 16 years he personally 
has presented the Centralia Foundation's Newspaper Awards certificates and checks 
honoring outstanding news, advertising and photography work by members of the 
Sentinel staff. The awards are financed by a trust fund he established with the 
Foundation in 1945. 

3DIT0R PAUL COUSLEY . ALTON EVENING TELEGRAPH, sends this correction regarding a brick 
company's offer of land for sanitary landfill use by the city: "Sorry to disillusion 
you about the power of the press. The neighbors finally raised such a ruckus that 
the brick company withdrew the offer to the city. Meanwhile, the mayor had called 
me personally to remonstrate that the editorial had tried to embarrass the city by 
making it look as if the brick company was getting a good thing. All we were tiying 
to do was make the refuse disposal more acceptable to the neighbors. Guess we were 
right and the mayor was wrong, for once." 

IIANT5D — Young neus and ad man for 3,100 circulation weekly. Salary open. HENRY 
NEWS-REPUBLICAN, Henry, 111... Publisher Dick Finfgeld adds, "Many thanks, and best 
wishes for the best Christmas ever. Send bill for charges involved. !l .,.(Hmmm. The 
charges, Dick, will be a smile and a hearty handshake the next time you attend an 
SIEA meeting, ai: Augustine's in Belleville, Jan. 19, or at SIU in April.) 

USING STATIONERY bought and paid for by the great state of Illinois and addressing 
the Newsl. ed. in a most undignified manner as "fellow troughsman," Grover- the- Rover 
Shipton writes from his lush location at the U. of I.: "Darnedest things happen to 
me-- like the mail this morning. What do I get but my copy of the News litter (thanks 
a million for putting me back on the list and catching me up on all the tidbits of 
my confrers) and also a letter and check for SIEA dues for TWO YEARS, yet, from 
buddyboy better- late- than- never T.B. Comerford, down Clark county way* A slight 
drool formed in the corner of my mouth as I looked at the check (P.R. men aren't 
as well paid up here as they are down there), but even so my moral fibre proved 
stronger than my physical sensibilities, and I'm enclosing the letter and the check 
herewith." (Better not check on that pay scale, Grover, you might forever be ashamed 
to ask for more.) 

"Not much to report on the home front here. You and your No. 1 boss pretty 
well covered the goings-on at our press club meeting. The Record looks superb under 
Paul Simon's ownership and Bill Crozier's managership— a matter that shakes me to 
the core. I still have strings that tie me to Roodhouse, however— like, for instance, 
a Goss Comet press, unsold; a press building 20' x 40', unsold; and a 9- room home, 
unsold. I keep telling Tiny Tim that we'll have a wonderful Christmas •• .On second 
thought— maybe I'd better keep T.B.'s check. '•• (Don't be mislead by the above sigh 
for sympathy. The Rover is in clover. To add icing to the cake, he's probably 
looking for a job for bis good wife right now. Nevertheless, if you need it, buy the 
Goss Comet; then the Shipton's No. 2 daughter can come here to school. This will 
cause trouble in the home, and there will be another letter. • .Watch this space!) 

"Give our best, please, to all the Egyptians... Merry Christmas ..." 

TH2 NOTE from Tom Comerford, MARTINSVILLE PLANET, reads: "Grover: Sorry I failed to 
send in 1962 dues. I see you have retired, quit or found a better job, so please 
forward this check to the new sec .-tress. I'm also including the 1963 dues— to make 
up for my tardiness this year". •• (As we have claimed repeatedly, all newsmen are 
capitalists. Imagine having an EXTR A f ive bucks just before Christmas!) 

Compiled by Information Service, Southern Illinois University, for the Southern 
Illinois Editorial Association, the News litter is made possible because of the extent 
to which area editors include Information Service on their mailing lists. (more) 



Page 2 

"PINCRNEYVILLE .— A directed verdict in favor of the defendant ended a $250,000 libel 
suit against the BELLEVILLE (111.) NEWS-DEMOCRAT by former Sheriff Daniel F. Ring. 
Circuit Judge Richard T. Carter sustained a defense motion for dismissal on the 
ground Mr, Ring had failed to show sufficient evidence to warrant the case going to 
a jury. 

"The suit was based on two editorials which were written by Robert L. and 
Richard P. Kern, editors of the NEWS-DEMOCRAT, deploring laxity of jail control. "7- 
EDITOR & PUBLISHER, 

ABOVE the desk in the office of the RAMSEY NEWS-JOURNAL is a large photograph in a 
large frame, a portrait of Julius Mueller 61 years ago when he was 19. He plans to 
retire in another 10 or 20 years, but right now he's too busy setting type. • .His son 
Bob is a lucky individual who encountered six coveys of quail on opening day. Bob's 
son Bob is stationed at Bremerhaven, Germany, where there were so many guests on 
Thanksgiving that the victuals were sort of picked over before the "troops'" turn to 
eat. Young Bob is the father of a bouncing heir— of which Bob Sr. carries about a 
dozen pix in his billfold. Not only does this make Julius a greatgrandfather, but 
indications are that young Bob will be an uncle, come spring, if you follow our 
reasoning. 

BELATED sympathy to the STEELEVTLLE LEDGER Websters, father and son. A year ago, one 
of their prize bird dogs was called to his reward via a heart attack on the opening 
day of the season. Then their other dog, one of the best, managed to hang himself 
while trying to jump out of the pen... Ruby McClure laughed when "Huts" was telling 
us of these two untimely passings. Such behavior is known in the trade as laughing 
in the wrong place, and there is no explanation for it other than to point out the 
obvious, that she is a woman, and women are unexplainable...It is possible, of course, 
that she thinks printing is more important than hunting. • .Anyway, there will be 
letters « 

LY NN ASHT ON in the Fischers' DUPO HERALD TRIBUNE asks, "Have you seen the new football 
hand-holding mittens?.,. Only three mittens— one a double one for the two hands... 
Some how or other hand-holding never did seem as stupid as playing footsie." 

WHEN the ALTON EVENING TELEGRAPH had its recent Open House, one of the large posters 
created by the art department "revealed" the extent of the paper's stringer system. 
Adding "color" to the picture of the display were the images of such notables as Joe 
Droragoole, now retired; John Focht, Joe's successor; Lowell Seitzinger, veteran desk 
man, and Sebastian Filippone.,,On the occasion of Joe's retirement Oct, 27, the 
TELEGRAPH also honored 35 other employees at the paper's first awards banquet*. .Paul 
B. Cousley, publisher and recently retired editor, and Henry H. McAdams, business 
manager, addressed the more than 100 employees and guests who attended. 

C.E. "CORKY" TOWNSEND . GRANITE CITY PRESS-RECORD, has "gone ABC," with the step Ming 
explained in detail to PRESS-RECORD readers ,. .The P-R circulation now is about 16,000, 
This is NOT the ABC figure because we have somehow managed not to have the ABC story 
at hand, , .Jim McLaren, Jersey County DEMOCRAT- NEWS, has so much time left from 
> running his newspaper that he also operates The Flower Shop, a travel bureau on the 
second floor of The Flower Shop building, and a McLaren office equipment business is 
about to come into being across the street. On occasion, Jim has used a double truck 
to advertise one or more of his operations ,, .When Ed Jacquin, the voice of Olin, 
visited the R00DH0USE RECORD shortly after the change in ownership, he failed to 
recognize syndicate head Paul Simon, who was covered with more ink than was on the 
rollers, 

BARRY L. PORTER , publisher of the HARDIN COUNTY INDEPENDENT and mayor of Elizabethtown, 
hospitalized Oct. 16 because of a heart attack, got "out" after 26 days and, according 
to recent reports, has been taking short walks near home,,,We think the Family and 
Home supplement is new with O.J. Lere's LEROY JOURNAL. (more) 



Page 3 

MRS. ROY RUCKER , BRIDGEPORT LEADER, rated a page 1 picture when she visited kinder- 
garten students in a temporary classroom, one of many in use when classes were 
dispersed throughout the town when the heating system failed in the public school 
building... Clint Schroeder, CASSVILLE, WISCONSIN, AMERICAN, has launched a companion 
newspaper, the PATOSI-TENNISON SPOKESMAN. 

JIM CHOISER . BENTON EVENING NEWS, got his picture into print when the State American 
Legion presented a citation for the newspaper's role in the successful staging of 
the Legion's baseball tournament in Benton. . .When the EDWARDSVILLE INTELLIGENCER 
was commended in a city council meeting for a good job of governmental reporting, a 
lone dissenter asked, "Why?" 

JOE ATOR . CHICAGO TRIBUNE veteran, has given up on a dream of many years that he 
someday would run a nursery— the bush and tree kind. Joe has reluctantly concluded 
that there just aren't enough years left for that kind of an undertaking... Which is 
taking the dim view, sort of. ..Jim Howard, Wyoming's part-time gift to Info. Service 
and former editor of the LARAMIE BOOMERANG, once worked for Harry F. Reutlinger, 
former m. e. of CHICAGO'S AMERICAN, who died Nov. 20... Jim, who has "been around," 
was a copy boy on the AMERICAN when he emerged from the Navy in 1946. 

IRVIN FRANK has been running the St. Louis AP Bureau since veteran Alan Merritt 
deserted to the POST-DISPATCH... Visited there one day with Bob Lamme, former SIU 
grad student in journalism, who seems to be doing quite well as a wireman...Leo 
Seroka, UPI news chief in St. L., formerly was in New York and Memphis... When the 
Cuban crisis was at its peak back in October, John Sheley, PINCKNEYVILLE DEMOCRAT, 
ran on page one, perpendicularly, a panoramic view of U.S. troops and the Atlantic 
Fleet at Guantanmo Bay in 1910J 

BRAVE PANA PAUSCHERT served recently in Springfield on a publicity panel before the 
Illinois Federation of Women's Clubs •••Among others participating were Pauline 
Telford, women's editor, ILLINOIS STATE JOURNAL, and Peg Keilholz, Chicago free 
lance writer whom, we suspect, was once in one of our journalism classes at Urbana 
High shortly after the turn of the century— but succeeded nevertheless. 

NEWSL. ED . submits to surgery, solicits sympathy. ••Following the 1961 physical check- 
up, we described at length the "surgery" which followed, involving removal of a sist 
from the seat— aggravated by an all-day ride on an animal known as a horse. •• 
Yesterday we had anutherin. This "operation" lasting at least 10 minutes, will not 
be described in detail because of the delicate and sensitive nature of our 12 readers 
...When we moved into Anthony Hall a few weeks ago, the furnishings and all, quite 
nice, were provided with an air of "this is what you want and the way you want it," 
and the fellow who installed the stuff was upset when we attempted to deviate some- 
what from the "plan"... We were reminded of this day before yesterday when a nurse 
suggested we enter the hospital the evening prior to the cutting and slashing... 
"Hold everything," we suggested, "This hardly warrants deluxe conditioning, but she 
relented only when the medic approved the reprieve •••Although we had been able to 
quail hunt for hours on recent occasions, when we did arrive at the hospital we had 
to SIT IN A WHEELCHAIR, properly draped, and ride to the operating room, with a 
wisp of a nurse struggling to push that contraption down the hall. After the 
"ordeal," during which we vied with the Dr. in making clever comments, TWO nurses 
helped us back into the buggy while the M, D. explained half-apologetically, "We 
have our routines, you know # " 

WAYNE LEEMAN , POST- DISPATCH, made, as far as we know, a special trip down here to 
protest that the man who does all the legwork for the P-D State Edition was not 
mentioned recently in the Newsl. when all other state desk personnel were glorified c 
•••We tried to point out to Mr, Leeman that he never is in his office, that it has 
been two or three years since he has bought us a meal and that we simply could not 
bear to mention him simply by saying that he was out* (more) 



Page 4 

SINCERE SYMPATHY to Joe Davison, CHRISTOPHER PROGRESS, whose father died last week at 
his home in DuQuoin...In October Mr. and Mrs. James A. Williams of Carrollton, 
Missouri, observed their 60th wedding anniversary. He has been in the newspaper 
business 68 years. 

R.L. SCOTT . CARROLLTON GAZETTE- PATRIOT, was of no help when Bill Crosier, ROODHOUSE 
RECORD, tried to identify Roy V. Scott, author of an article in the Illinois State 
Historical Society Journal* Subsequent "research" revealed that the writer was a 
native of Greene County and now a professor at the University of Mississippi* 

LES STONE writes a lively column on livestock and farm news for the ALEDO TIMES-RECORD 
which again sponsored its annual party in which a "whole flock" of turkeys were given 
away prior to Thanksgiving* •• John Glanzner, TRENTON SUN: "Restaurants are so swank 
nowadays that you find yourself forgetting why you went there*" 

PETE SEYMOUR . Centralia, received first mention in the glory column of the A.P. news- 
letter for his background story on racial tension in Cairo* * .Paul Cousley, ALTON 
EVENING TELEGRAPH, is credited with suggesting a series of A.P. features on recent 
developments in Illinois school districts— and contributed the first article... The 
newsletter proudly reports Jack Hanafin, LITCHFIELD NEWS-HERALD, is the 57th A.P. 
member in Illinois. 

SAM SMITH . METROPOLIS NEWS: "The trouble with most political promises is that they 
go in one year and out the other. • .It's a good thing for the American people to get 
the daylights scared out of them now and then because it makes us wake up and realize 
the importance of our free elections and the dangers of electing irresponsible men to 
office... I don't have much patience for the man who gets so concerned about the 
national and international situation that he will close his eyes to the needs of his 
own community* **If we don't have a strong community, we can't expect to have a great 
nation*" 

BILL MORG AN, SPARTA NEWS-PLAINDEALER, must be getting old* He has taken to reminiscing 
when substituting as editor of his dad's column* Bill recalls a Morgan chariot of 
1936 vintage which had a heater but no defroster— in which, during a blizzardy drive 
somewhere in Missouri, Howe drove for miles with his head out the window trying to 
see the road* 

MOSE MOSER . STAUNTON STAR TIMES, recently devoted a column to three newspaper men: 
the late Bryant Voris, WATERLOO REPUBLICAN; Paul Vannier, who so disliked work that 
he sold out the BLUFFS TIMES and the MEREDOSIA BUDGET, and Senator Paul Simon, TROY 
TRIBUNE. If Mose had been thinking more about his writing and less about float 
fishing in Missouri, he could not have referred to the Meredosia paper as the 
"MESSENGER."* **Much of a subsequent column was devoted to Vern Ittner's discontinuance 
of the HIGHLAND JOURNAL, where Mose got his start 55 years ago— learning to set type 
by hand and feeding a foot-operated job press— all under the stern eye of John N* 
Stokes, "one who was able to say more in a single paragraph than most of us can say 
in half a column." Stokes published the JOURNAL for 40 years before retiring in 
favor of brother Ittner* 

S, L. SHAW . PETERSBERG OBSERVER, carried a pix of a bloomin' apple tree on Oct, 18.., 
In his column, S. L* observes, "If it is atmosphere you're looking for, then all you 
need do is climb into the family car some sunny afternoon and drive some 50 miles 
into the southwest to visit Calhoun County", • .He explains why Calhoun County has 
never had a railroad... "On one side is the Illinois river with a valley you can almost 
toss a baseball across, and on the other side some 6 miles away is the Mississippi, 
the two rivers offer transportation, and there is little between the two streams 
except a high ridge which is covered with apple orchards. So why should a railroad 
try to compete with geography and cheaper water transportation?". ..In his "For The 
Record" column, LAWRENCEVILLE DAILY RECORD, Cal Reynolds attempts to define a "French 
curve*" (more) 



.+>&& 5 

BULLETIN 1 1— WHEN THE WINTER MEETING is held at Augustine's famous restaurant in 
Belleville, JANUARY 19, Bob Kern, BELLEVILLE NEWS -DEMOCRAT, will deliver the official 
welcome and will arrange special entertainment for the visiting notables, Pres. 
Hoffman reports. ..Bob also has invited the membership to visit the NEWS-DEMOCRAT 
plant, a most interesting place... The building is old but well preserved. It is the 
building in which Bob was born and spent his younger years "upstairs." But the 
NEWS-DEMOCRAT boasts some of the most modern equipment*—with more on the way. Bob 
will tell you about it... The program is shaping up to be one of the most stimulating 
ever, but is not quite "finalized"... A Yule card from The Voice of Olin indicates it 
was written just after Ed Jacquin and Bob Bliss had been "slithering through the 
rain" to deliver some gifts... Must be more to it.. .Can you imagine that pair 
"slithering through"? 

LATE BULLETIN : Vem Ittner, Highland, suffered a heart attack Monday night in the 
middle of a city council meeting. He was hospitalized immediately; was expected to 
be able to go home Wednesday or soon afterwards .. .Vern has filed for reelection to 
the council. This may or may not alter that decision. 

FRED PRUETT tried to buy Morris Vallow's KINMUNDY EXPRESS a few years ago but decided 
the price was too high, "thereby", as Norris comments, "passing up an opportunity to 
make millions. "...However, Fred recovered sufficiently to become a journalism prof, 
at the University of Colorado and later to launch the Pruett Press in Boulder. In 
1954 the business had one full-time employee and one part-time assistant. Today it 
has a full-time crew of 16 with five part-timers. They operate five offset presses 
plus building and shipping departments. A letterpress operation was added following 
a recent move into a new building. 

ED PAXTON , PADUCAH SUN-DEMOCRAT: "It is said that Napoleon Bonaparte had a motto 
which he lived by: 'Make no little plans. 1 

"After our first look at the artist's conception of laducah's proposed Downtown 
Civic Center, it can be said that our city planners, city commission, and civic 
leaders are indeed following Napoleon's dictum. It is a big, an ambitious, a breath" 
takingly beautiful plan. 

"Perhpas it will require many years to realize fulfillment in its entirety. But 
with the fine community morale that is now evident here in so many ways, this is not 
an impractical plan. With inspired and courageous leadership, we can make it come 
true." 

N OVEMBER 1 was the 14th anniversary for the Blanchard triun?verate, owners of the 
GILLESPIE NEWS. Charlie observes briefly: "There is little of the original 
equipment in use today. We moved to our own building, and at the time it seemed 
plenty large, but we found it necessary to add two additions, and the end isn't yet. 
There are two Linotypes where formerly there was one. We have seen the old handfed 
presses give way to automatics. The past few years have seen the addition of a 
Little Giant and a Miller press, and after years of faithful service we discarded 
the old Miehle newspaper press and hand folder in favor of a Duplex flatbed, where 
we print from rolls with the papers printed and folded in one operation. 

"We also have the only engraving plant in Macoupin county. 

"Besides The Gillespie News and The Brighton News, we publish The Illinois 
TJnion Farmer, and have recently taken over the printing of The Calhoun Herald. We 
are also the official printers for the Progressive Associated Grocers. 

"We have come a long way, but it has taken work, hard work, for many long hours, 
but we are interested in progress, not only in our own plant, but in the City of 
Gillespie and Macoupin county, as well." 

BILL SCHMITT . MACOUPIN COUNTY ENQUIRER: "'Now, please put it on the front page where 
everybody will see it' 1 How often we newspaper folks hear that... Why, bless your 
hearts, gentle readers, if we thought people read only the first page of The Enquirer, 
we'd print one page every week and quit...." 

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This is the time to say again, sincerely, thanks for your 
interest, your wonderful cooperation and, most of all, your 
friendliness. We've said it before, that without your help we 
would not be in business— which x*e never forget. Only other 
field in which we are experienced is that of peddling ice, in 
which, we are advised, labor demands have dropped sharply, 
which is only one of the reasons why we hope to continue 
pleasant relations with you. 

HAPPY NEW YEAR ! 

Sincerely, 



From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



9 

12 - 14 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Against the weird backdrop of a snowstorm, 
fisheries researchers at Southern Illinois University Monday (Dec. 10) launched a 
major new field investigation. 

While flakes swirled about their heads and with landing nets freezing in the 
air, workers in SIU's Cooperative Fisheries Research Laboratory dumped 40 channel 
catfish into a group of small ponds near DeSoto. It marked the first step in what 
laboratory director William Lewis calls a "big push" to develop programs for 
raising the sporty, tasty fish like so much corn or beef. 

Site of the operation is former stripmine land owned by Joe Moroni, an area 
businessman and sportsman. For the past two years, Moroni has sponsored a research 
project on rearing rainbow trout in a stripmine pit on his place. That panned 
out, proving that the species can be successfully developed in this area and 
held over for fall fishing. Now averaging a pound in size, some 350 of the 
southern Illinois-reared rainbows are being boarded in a small, shallow pond to 
see if they can survive in such an environment—typical of farm ponds— over the 
winter . 

The channel cat study will be aimed primarily at determining whether 
researchers can get reproduction from the pilot colony. The 40 brood fish, 
brought in from Arkansas, go about two and one-half pounds for females and three 
pounds for the males* 

"The payoff will come next June, when a successful first spawn should appear," 
says Lewis, "There is considerable potential in rearing channel catfish under 
controlled conditions, both commercially and for sport fisheries management. 
Because of other work, we're behind in this xfide-open area of research. Now 
we really intend to push it." 

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Catfish farming, says Lewis, is a big thing in Arkansas, Missouri and, more 
recently, Kentucky, but hasn't been widely exploited in southern Illinois. The 
Moroni-supported project will try to prove that channel cat can be reproduced in 
this area. One advantage would be using the product to supplement recreational 
fishing, particularly during the mid-summer months when bass and bluegill action 
wanes • 

As a field resource combined with the laboratory's own 18-pond experimental 
setup near the SIU campus, the Moroni stripmine area has produced more than one 
research benefit. 

A year-long effort to rear smallmouth bass, another relatively rare species 
in the area, paid off in October with a count of 522 yearlings (five inches) from 
an original stock of 14 brood size smallmouths. The brood crop had been brought 
up in a river -bottom pond, then transferred to a one-acre pond at Moroni's. The 
yearlings now have been replanted in a 15-acre stripmine pond to see how they 
fare over another year. 

"The smallmouth study shows promise and it could mean a lot for recreational 
fishing in these parts,' 1 Lewis says. "But we know they can't stand competition 
from other fish, so any management programs would probably require rather rigid 
environmental controls." 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 

Editors: Note local names 



12 - 14 - 62 
Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE , ILL., Dec. — They may not realize it, but high school students 
in classes from Lake Forest south to Paducah, Ky., are helping to pioneer a new 
look in English teaching. 

They're the pupils of 42 selected teachers who spent last summer at Southern 
Illinois University in a reappraisal and tentative overhauling of secondary school 
English programs. Sponsored partly by the nationwide Commission on English of the 
College Entrance Examination Board, the summer course at SIU was one of 20 at 
chosen campuses in the nation. The main objective of them all was to strengthen 
English preparation for college by more emphasis on writing— both in practice 
and rhetorical study— careful and critical reading, and more intensified studies 
of language. 

Alumni of the summer institute convened here Dec, 7 to report successes and 
failures in instituting a new look in English teaching at their home schools. After 
hearing the reports Georgia Winn, one of three SIU English faculty members who 
directed the institute, said "there is a definite spirit of freshness, of 
experimentation in these schools. The teachers have a wider range of approaches 
to use." 

Teachers praised the cooperation received from their home school administrators, 
Mrs. Winn said. "Not only more writing, but writing with a specific purpose is 
being assigned to classes; fewer assignments about personal experiences and more 
based on the reading they have done." 

A prime objective of the program as worked out in the summer institute is 
teaching of composition, language and literature as intimately related to one 
another, not as separate courses. "In literature, most of the teachers are 
abandoning surveys and coverage approaches to concentrate on a few unabridged and 

unaltered masterpieces," Mrs. Winn said. "Students are expected to read analytically 

to study authors 1 styles and how they use the English language for effective results, 

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Al though the Commission on English reports no funds to support sir.dlar summer 
institutes ne;:t year, SIU plans a graduate credit course similar to the pilot 
effort, Mrs. Winn said. Meanwhile, she is visiting home class rooms of the 1962 
institute members to see how the theory is working out in actual practice. Her 
observation to date is that classroom discussions are lively and student 
participation is improving. 

Teachers who attended the Dec. 7 report meeting, by home towns: 

ANNA-J011ESB0RO: Frances Sitter 

CAIIOKIA: James Funkhouser 

CAIRO: Helen Adams (Sumner) 

CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO.: Betty Folsom (Central); Alene Sadler (Central) 

CARBONDALE: Margaret Crowe (Community); Luella Davis (Attucks); John O'Neal 

(At tucks) 
CARMI: Mary Lou Dixon 
CARTERVILLE: Shirley Marsh 
CAVE-IN-ROCK: Robert Frantz 

DECATUR: Norman Stewart (MacArthur) 
DUQUOIH: Marvin Klein 

EDWARDSVILLE: Doris Lentz (Civic Memorial) 

FAIRFIELD: Jack Dillon 

FLOSSMOOR: Joseph Diamond (Homewood-Flossmoor) 

GENEVA: Frank Church 

JACKSON, MO.: Elizabeth Cracroft 

JENNINGS, MO.: Mother Ignatius Miller, OSU (Corpus Chris ti) 

LAGRANGE: Byford Richardson (River side-Brookfield) 
LAKE FOREST: Joseph Logsdon (Lake Forest Academy) 

MADISON: John Phelan 

MEDINAH: Donald Hazen (Lake Park) 

MURPHYSBORO: Leslie Palmer 

NORTHBROOK: Robert Neumann (Glenbrook) 

ORLAND PARK: Ruth Barwick (Carl Sandburg) 

PADUCAH, KY.: Arwilda Burton (Paducah Public Schools); Myrtle Johns (Jetton 
Junior High); Martha Dell Sanders (Brazelton Junior High); 
Lawrence Suffill (Heath) 

ROXANA: Ernest House 

SIKESTON, MO.: Ella Wilkens (Sikeston Public Schools) 

TAYLORVILLE: Elbert Songer 

WEST FRANKFORT: Afton Wolfe -pb- 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 14 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Aubrey J. Holmes, Springfield, e2:ecutive secretary 
of the Illinois Teachers Retirement System, was cited as "Alumnus of the Week" 
in the SIU News Review program telecast over Southern Illinois University's 
NSIU-TV (Channel 8) Thursday (Dec. 13). 

Holmes, winner of an SIU Alumni Achievement Award in 1959, served as president 
of the SIU Alumni Association (1955-56), as president of the Springfield Area 
SIU Alumni Club (1949-50), and is currently vice president of the SIU Foundation. 

He was principal of Johnston City High School from 1942 to 1947 when he 
accepted his present position. An auditor and public accountant, he is author of 
a series of articles on "Investment Philosophy," "Portfolio Management," and 
"Actuarial Insurance and Retirement Planning." 

He is a member of Kappa Phi Kappa and Phi Delta Kappa, honorary education 
fraternities. Holmes was graduated from Southern in 1935. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



r 



12 - 14 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Area psychologists for the Illinois Office of Public 
Instruction have turned up a case of "school phobia 1 '— an emotional upset on entering 
school buildings— in a southern Illinois community. 

The case was described Thursday (Dec. 13) at a statewide meeting of area 
psychologists at Southern Illinois University. Sam Thornton, chief psychologist for 
the 32-county area of f ice, located on the SIU campus, said the victim, a high school 
freshman, is being gradually relieved of her symptoms by a member of his staff. 

Thornton said the girl first showed the hysterical signs of school phobia 
shortly after her father died— while she was in a grade school class. He described 
her subsequent reactions as extreme fits of crying, fear and near seizures when she 
had to return to school. 

The city school superintendent, Thornton said, got her to go back by taking her 
to school himself and attending classes with her. She graduated from grade school 
but had another breakdown when she attended her first high school class. 

Thornton said the case was referred to his office, one of four maintained by 
the state to give psychological and special education help to public schools. A 
staff psychologist has returned the student to almost full-time attendance, after 
weakening her inhibitions with hour-a-day "force feedings" of school, then increasing 
the dosage. 

Thornton said school phobia is not uncommon in metropolitan areas, but it is 
the first example uncovered by the state office in southern Illinois. He said the 
phobia has been shown to exist in youngsters who have developed a deep hostility to 
their mothers, and have at soma time subconsciously had "I wish you were dead" 
thoughts. They then develop the phobia when, away at school, they think their 
wishes might come true, and want to get back home to mother's side. 



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From Bill Lyons 12-14-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec, — Ten new graduate fellowships worth a minimum of 
$6,600 apiece to winners have been announced by Southern Illinois University as a 
result of newly- approved programs under the National Defense Education Act. 

David Kenney, assistant dean of the graduate school, said the U.S. Office 
of Education has approved SIU for NDEA programs in English (five fellowships), 
psychology (three fellowships) and elementary education (two). The programs will 
become active next September. 

The fellowships pay stipends of $2,000 the first year, $2,200 the second and 
$2,400 the third and also provide $400 yearly for each dependent. Applications 
are now being accepted by SIU department chairmen. 

Kenney said SIU's three awards were among 623 approved in the U.S. for the 
1963 school year. Seven NDEA fellows are now enrolled at Southern in microbiology 
and elementary education programs first approved in 1950 and 1959. English is a 
newcomer to the list of NDEA-supported courses, 

Kenney said the grants are designed to put qualified candidates all the way 
through graduate school to doctoral degrees. 



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From Bill Lyons <pJ % 12-14-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY . J- 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



0' ^12-14- 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — College graduates becoming teachers at all levels 
are getting more money - and the demand remains constant and heavy, Dr. R.oye Bryant, 
director of Southern Illinois University's Placement Service, reported today. 

Bryant, issuing a yearly report on placement activities, said 1962 graduates 
going into education found some new things to consider - the demand for secondary 
teachers was about as much as that for elementary instructors for the first time 
in years, and the calls were more than doubled on the junior college, college, 
and university levels. 

The placement study showed the average salary for the 1962 SIU bachelor's 
degree elementary teacher was $4,670 - a 3% per cent hike over that received by the 
like 1961 graduate. The secondary (high school) bachelor's degree teacher got an 
average of $4,758, also a 3% per cent boost. The average pay for the 1962 SIU 
master's degree elementary teacher was $5,627 - about the same as last year, and 
for the master's degree secondary instructor, the amount was $5,668 - 2% per cent 
more than in 1961. 

Bryant said only 4.7 per cent of all the teaching vacancies listed were in the 
lower 31 counties of Illinois, but 49.4 per cent of SIU's graduates teaching school 
this year accepted positions in the southern portion. 

Illinois hired the most SIU graduates as teachers (504), with Missouri second 
(49), while Jackson County (53), St. Clair (48), Cook (41), Madison (31), and 
Williamson (30) led the list of counties which hired SIU graduates to teach in their 
schools. 

Bryant said 44 per cent of the total graduates entered teaching. They took 
teaching positions in 29 states, 72 counties in Illinois, and two foreign countries. 



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Area basketball fans are well acquainted with three of Southern Illinois 

University's guard prospects, left to right, Eddie Blythe, Rod Linder and 

Eldon Bigham, who are receiving instructions here from first-year coach Jack Hartman. 

Blythe formerly starred at Carbondale Attucks while Linder was a South Seven 

Conference standout at Centralia and Bigham performed for Pinckneyville. They all 

are expected to see action Thursday night when the Salukis, who won three of their 

first four games, host Worth Dakota State. With the majority of SIU's student 

population home for the holidays, fans should have no difficulty in being able to 

secure seats for the game which is to be played in the Men's Gymnasium on campus, 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 12-14-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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From Bill Lyons -Y 12 - 21 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Committees have been formed for the Fifth annual Model 
United Nations General Assembly at Southern Illinois University, Feb. 8-9, 
David P. Lauerman, secretary-general, announced today. 

Lauerman, a graduate student in government from (415 S. Railway) Mascoutah, 
said the purpose of the Model UN is to give students from SIU and colleges throughout 
the state the opportunity to discuss and debate issues currently before the United 
Nations . 

Topics on this year's agenda include: disarmament, colonialism, economic 
development and finance of the United Nations. 

All colleges in Illinois have been invited to send representatives. 
Miss Elizabeth Mullins of the student activities office and Dr. Frank Klingberg of 
the government department are advisors for the event. 

Committee members include: 

CARBONDALE: Karan Davis, R.R.I, properties committee; Emil Peterson, 334 W. 
Walnut, agenda committee; Tod D. Cornell, 418 W. Monroe, properties committee 
CENTRALIA: Morris Tolley, 531 S. Poplar, properties committee 
CHICAGO: Carol Cubra, 9347 S. Luella, reception and accomodation committee 

DECATUR: Pamela Newberry, 980 W. William, reception and accomodation committee 

KIRKWOOD, Mo.: Mary E. Craver, 101 E. Essex, delegations committee 

NASHVILLE: Willard A. Meyer, 520 W. St. Louis, delegations committee 

OLNEY: Linda Brummet, 1010 E, South, reception and accomodation committee 

PONTIAC: Carl Adlcins, 1118 S. Mill, publicity committee 

WATSEKA: Judy Mae Wallace, 119 N. Fourth, reception and accomodation committee 

Foreign students serving on the various committees include: 

EITH0PIA: Assefa Fre-Hiwet, Addis Ababa, agenda committee; Zenebowork Teshome, 
Addis Ababa, reception and accomodation 

HONG KONG: Hilary K.L. Hsu, Kowloon, agenda committee 

PAKISTAN: Abdul Lateef, Montgomery, agenda committee 

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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Car bond ale, Illionois 
Phone: 453-2276 



Jr 



12 - 21 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Dec. — Proposed changes in the makeup of the Illinois 
Division of Vocational Education and the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation 
will be discussed when the Board of Vocational Education meets here Jan. 9, 
according to one of its members. 

Guy Renzaglia, one of six lay members of the board, said the business agenda 
for the quarterly meeting will include a blueprint for "streamlining and modifying" 
the two agencies under the board's control. Renzaglia, director of Southern 
Illinois University's Rehabilitation Institute, said the board will consider a 
proposal that DVR be made an independent state agency with its own executive 
officer instead of merely supervisory control. 

The main business meeting will be conducted at the SIU board of trustees room 
in the President's Office, following a tour of the SIU campus. 

Executive members are the directors of Illinois departments: Francis J. Gerty, 
mental health; Uilliam Sylvester White, registration and education; Ray Page, 
public instruction; Ralph Bradley, agriculture; Robert Donnelly, labor and 
F.D. Yoder, public health. 

Other lay members with Renzaglia are William Gellman, head of Chicago's 
Jewish Vocational Service; George Barr, Chicago industrialist; Rilma Buckman, 
Chicago social service executive; Dr. Edward Ellisberg, Highland Park; and 
William Rutherford, Peoria attorney who also is a member of the Illinois Public 
Aid Commission. 



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From Bill Lyons 12-21-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



Eli Gilbert Lentz, Carbondale former professor of history, dean of men and 
director of alumni services at Southern Illinois University, was honored as 
"Alumnus of the Week" on the SIU News Review program over USIU-TV (Channel 8) 
Thursday (Dec, 20). 

Lentz spent 36 active years at Southern, retired in 1950 and was given the 
title of University Professor in recognition of his long service to Southern. 

He was chairman of a committee which planned the University's diamond jubilee 
in 1949 and wrote a book, "Seventy-Five Years in Retrospect," tracing the origin 
and development of SIU to commemorate the jubilee. 

He joined the Southern Illinois Normal University faculty in 1914, served as 
an assistant in the English department, as a teacher of mathematics, assistant 
in the senior high school, history and civics teacher, secondary examiner and 
adviser, and curator of the Clint Clay Tilton Library, as well as professor of 
history and dean of men during his career at SIU. The dining hall at the 
Thompson Point residence hall area is named in his honor. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbcndale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



nA \JS 



*H 



12 - 21 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



Eli Gilbert Lentz, Carbondale former professor of history, dean of men and 
director of alumni services at Southern Illinois University, was honored as 
"Alumnus of the Week" on the SIU News Review program over USIU-TV (Channel 8) 
Thursday (Dec. 20). 

Lentz spent 36 active years at Southern, retired in 1950 and was given the 
title of University Professor in recognition of his long service to Southern. 

He was chairman of a committee which planned the University's diamond jubilee 
in 1949 and wrote a book, "Seventy-Five Years in Retrospect," tracing the origin 
and development of SIU to commemorate the jubilee. 

He joined the Southern Illinois Normal University faculty in 1914, served as 
an assistant in the English department, as a teacher of mathematics, assistant 
in the senior high school, history and civics teacher, secondary examiner and 
adviser, and curator of the Clint Clay Til ton Library, as well as professor of 
history and dean of men during his career at SIU. The dining hall at the 
Thompson Point residence hall area is named in his honor. 



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Ho. 457 December 22, 1962 

S. I, E, A, N E W S L I T T E R 

"FRANK!' HANNEFIN , LITCHFIELD NEWS-HERALD, 
will tell all— the joys and sorrows, the 
high points and the low of going offset 
DAILY when the SIEA Winter Meeting is held 
at Augustine's famous restaurant in 
Belleville, Saturday, Jan. 19, a bulletin 
from Pres. Hoffman revealed today.. .This 
talk will be followed by an offset free- 
for-all, with no telling how many experts 
present to offer frank advice free--and 
freely... Of course, Jack hasn't experiencet 
all the joys yet. He's still setting hot 
type. Just wait until— but that will be 
covered in the "after session." 

THE FINAL session of the day will be the 
open forum type in which you can ask any 
question you want and rest assured that 
someone there will have the answer.. .We 
do not have the exact price of the 
luncheon at Augustine's, but it tvill NOT 
be more than two bucks. 

RESERVATION CARDS will reach you just 
about time you get back to normal after 
stuffing yourself Christmas day. ..If you 
decide RIGHT NOW to let your wife tag 
^ ■~~ :i ^^\ i ^' J | ^^^$$S*^>^ ( along (just TRY to make her stay home— go 

ahead) and decide whether to bring two or 
six guests, then you can return your card 
PROMPTLY. 

VERN ITTNER returned home Dec. 14 from the Highland hospital, where he enjoyed for a 
few days the little bit of rest that is possible in a hospital.. .Since Pres. Hoffman t 
paper is printed on TUESDAY now that he has "gone offset," and since he had all of the 
other work done by Wednesday evening, he took Thursday afternoon off and went to St. 
Louis— and accidentally bumped into the Bob Vorises, WATERLOO REPUBLICAN... We regret 
to report that they had had luncheon at the Playboy Club, where the "bunny girls" wait 
tables and such. RUSS SAID that Pat thought it was all a bit vulgar but that Bob 
thought it was— well, they're going to have luncheon at the waffle shop next time. 

HARDIN COUNTY INDEPENDENT . Dec. 14: "After undergoing more treatment in the Hardin 
County General Hospital since Tuesday, Publisher Porter was brought back this morning. 
The Sheriff went after him. There was no court order." 

THE CAP FRAZERS left Wednesday for Lakeland, Fla., ostensibly to visit son Dave, 
LAKELAND LEDGER, and wife but actually to get acquainted with their first grandchild, 
Mike., .When we complimented a friend on the fact that his wife seemed to follow his 
bidding without protest, although the "bidding" sometimes was a bit odd, he replied, 
"I'll have you know that she is not speechless". 

IT'S TIME for a change, Charlie Feirich's semi-annual change, that is. His address 

for the next few fortnights will be down in the Castro fringe area, Box 431, IslamoracU 

Florida.. .Feel free to drop in on the Feirichs at any time and stay as long as you can 

They will be only too glad to give you their bed and sleep in the carport. 

« . •» t * • ********** 

Compiled by Inrormation Service, Southern Illinois' University, for the Southern 

Illinois Editorial Association, the News litter is made possible because of the extent 
to which area editors include Information Service on their mailing lists. (more) 




Page 2 

TOM SCHERRER . GALLATIN DEMOCRAT, ran a two-column reprint from THE EAST ST, LOUIS 
JOURNAL concerning an 84-year old retired Journal printer, Philip Burris, who worked 
at the Shawneetown newspaper for the first 21 years of his newspaper life. ••From there 
he went to the MOUNT CARMEL REGISTER as a foreman from 1913-1919. "In those days 
everything was set by hand, " Burris told the Journal reporter, "taking days to do what 
the Linotype machines now do in hours," Burris possesses several prized old 
newspapers including a May 6, 1865 tabloid-sized HARPER'S WEEKLY, which was a special 
memorial to the death of President Lincoln, Burris concluded 64 years in the printing 
trade in 1954, with the last 35 years at the Journal, 

ENRIQUE CHINCHILLA ESTRADA , Associacion Guatemal A Teca De Basquetbr.i-Guatemala: wr i t es 
"Gentlemen's: I take extreme pleasure to gret you excutives of your organization. 
We should highly appeciate. If there is no inconvenient a few sport banners. Those 
banners, along wuth others of difetent countries, will be displayed in our principal 
hall,. .The addresses of Club's Universityes, amateurs and professional are unknown to 
us, We should appaciate it very much if you will forward this letter to these other- 
organizations •• .The banners don't have to difinately be basquet, footvoly, base ball's 
ect, ect, bur any others that ma be available.... Thansks for your cooperation. "Addres 
Enrique Chinchilla Estrada, 5 Av. No, 6-27 Zona, Tesopero- Admin., GUATEMALA 
SAM SMITH . METROPOLIS NEWS, used a full page ad to explain that the present cost of 
sending a 3-cent postal card to 4500 homes is $135, that on and after January 1 the 
cost will be $180 not including printing and addressing. The same amount of space in 
the Metropolis News carrying a message to 4500 homes costs only $7. 65.,, With discounts 
for frequent advertisers... Paul Simon, TROY TRIBUNE, has added many new papers to the 
long list which will carry his column beginning in January... Julius Mueller, RAMSEY 
NEWS -JOURNAL, was guest of honor at a dinner on his 80th birthday Nov. 18.... Head line 
in The Gillespie News: "Democrats Contribute For Termite Expulsion. "...The story 
concerned the debugging of the Redeemer Lutheran church and did not mention Democrats, 
but it may be that the Democrats are the only ones able to contribute. 

ED TAYLOR. PULASKI ENTERPRISE: "A rash of legislative proposals to solve problems 
incident to teen-age drinking comes in the wake of most tragedies caused by such 
behavior. • .If, in a society as materialistic as is ours, teen-agers sometimes get a 
false sense of values, who is to blame? •• .It's sad when tragedy overtakes anyone. It 
is especially sad when tragedy overtakes a teen-ager. There would be fewer tragedies 
if, instead of hastening to enact more laws in the wake of many such tragedies, we'd 
go about improving the moral climate." 

MRS. FRANK BOND , DONGOLA TRI-COUNTY RECORD: "The Record Mr. and Mrs. made a trip up 
north to visit the son and family in Oak Lawn. A side trip made to Wisconsin took us 
through a sauerkraut factory where we saw huge vats filled with cut-up cabbage, 
weighted down with large plastic sheets, covered with water to hold them in place 
(a little different but still the same idea of the earthen crock of our childhood 
that had a plate on top and a brick for weight )".... For a couple of days last summer 
we camped on the shore of the Chickahominy River in Virginia, For this reason, a 
Civil War piece was of particular interest. It dealt with a political race shortly 
after the war, and one of the candidates had much to say about his war record. The 
other countered by stating that he, too, had served his country by hiring a man to 
take his place in the draft, a man "whose bones now lie bleaching on the shores of 
the Chickahominy." 

FROM the REACTOR, campus newsletter for non- academic personnel. "Help Wanted: Writers 
for the Reactor. No salary but you can work in your own home. Experience the joy of 
seeing your words in print. "...Also, "Everyone in town is talking," remarked the wife, 
"about the Smith's quarrel. Some are taking her part and some his"... "And," replied 
her husband, "I suppose a few eccentric individuals are minding their own business"... 
"MIDDLE-AGE: I still stay out late when I choose to; I go in for dancing and such, 
And have as much fun as I used to, But I just don't enjoy it as much." 



Page 3 



-o 



"IT'S ALL PAID FOR ." said the cashier at Steeleville's leading beanery as we fumbled 
for cash after stuffing rather well following an all-day hunt Saturday,.. "Huts" 
Webster, gentleman, capitalist and publisher of the LEDGER, had been there ahead of 
us to pick up the check even before there was a check... Too busy to go out and 
somex-jhat under the weather, too, he had taken time earlier to drive his baby blue 
Cadillac out to Bud's budding ranch to be sure we had enough steam left to navigate... 
Although the guns were silent for extended periods that day, Webster the younger and 
"Cap" Frazer ref ought much of the World War II action in the southwest Pacific and 
most of the Korean campaign... In fact, the words were flying so fast that the Newsl. 
ed. never did get to tell of his thrilling record as a national guardsman (pfc) in 
the Battle of Camp McCoy, Wise... C. A., birdless until yesterday— through no fault of 
his own, recovered sensationally and was high man for the day until late afternoon, 
when Bud made a difficult shot, bringing his bird total to TWO, also... Up to that 
time, Bud had missed four or five shots in a row to bid for membership in the curved 
gunbarrell club, an organization in which the Newsl. ed. had held exclusive rights 
for more than a week... The Websters seem to have hunting privileges as far as the eye 
can see-- and we found out why. When farmers stop at the LEDGER shop to buy "No 
Hunting," signs, "Huts" makes no charge. And almost always the farmers "retaliate" 
by saying, "Of course, if you fellows want to hunt, come on out" •••"That's a lot of 
bull," someone remarked as we viewed a huge specimen of Black Angus masculinity at 
Bud's place. We had gone there in the afternoon to shoot into some "pet" coveys that 
frequented the feed lot, but the only "pets" we found were a mile away and wilder 
than a March windstorm... It was a great day to be out, and, all in all, a pleasant, 
easy hunt— so much so that next morning we were able to get out of bed on the third 
try. 

FRANCES FURLIN in Joe Davison's CHRISTOPHER PROGRESS: "While the art class was setting 
up a Christmas scene on the school lawn, one of the boys asked uncertainly, 'Where 
shall I put the three wise guys? "'•••When a fatal accident resulted from drag racing, 
O.J. Lere wrote an excellent editorial on the subject— and C. Feirich III used it for 
the lead editorial in Herschel Blazer's ALEDO TIMES-RECORD, 

IN CARROLL GERIG'S "Voice of the Village" column in the FLAT RIVER, MO., DAILY JOURNAI 
he quotes from an 1372 almanac: "There lives a merry cobler near Wilmington whose 
nose is so long that when he takes snuff he is obliged to walk forward three paces to 
reach the end of it." 

LOTS OF PUBLICITY resulted when Mt. Vernon Township High School students took a day 
off for visiting... Warren Strieker reported their stop at the OKAWVILLE TIMES... Tom 
Lee did the same regarding their call at the MARISSA MESSENGER... We presume the POST- 
DISPATCH gave them some space, because that's where they started in the first place, 
and the REGISTER- NEWS wrapped it up, 

ELMER FEDDER . METAMORA HERALD, will be getting some much-needed rest now that the 
local curfew law is in effect... Clint Schroeder, CASSVILLE, WISC ., AMERICAN, has been 
upping subscriptions by giving bicycles to kids with the most. • .Charlie Jones, 
VIRDEN RECORDER, opines that the new green and yellow license plate colors are 
"strictly John Deere"... As the plow said to the tractor, "Pull me closer, John Deere" 
— (Reprinted by popular demand.) 

BRBNDA SPIRES , Ramsey, a senior who works part-time in Info. Service, struck oil 
today, winning first prize of $150 in an Etherton Trust Fund essay contest. Her 
topic: "Religion Courses in State Universities." She is a math major! 

JOE MICHEIICH . AUBURN CITIZEN, is really trying to pep things up in his community. 
Had Santa visit the place three times •• .Wouldn't be a bit surprised to see Joe at 
Augustine's in Belleville, Jan, 19.. .The Property Owners League used a full page in 
the CENTRALIA SENTINEL to help garner votes for a community bond issue. The SENTINEL 
plugged hard for the same cause. The result? Defeat! 4 to 1, 

-more- 



Page 4 

LES HUNTER , MURPHYSBORO MURMUR, quotes some quotes from one John Kimball, such as: 
"Old age dims the eyes, interferes with the hearing, but the mouth works too much, 
the same as when young 11 ... "I do not believe that all men are born free and equal. And 
if there was any way of making them so, they wouldn't stay that way 24 hours." 

MAURICE JONES , JOHNSTON CITY PROGRESS, who thinks the person who complains about being 
up to his neck in work is just lying down on the job, reports: "For some time we have 
been looking forward to spending Christmas in Boston with the 2-year-old grandson... 
As in the past there will be no Progress published during the two weeks following 
Christmas. The Dec, 20 and 27 issues will be combined and the Jan. 3 issue will be 
combined with the paper to be printed Jan. 10, 1963. Experience has proven this the 
best way for the Progress employes to take a vacation and our subscribers have been 
most cons idar ate. We appreciate it." 

jgiEN JIM MCLAREN , JERSEY COUNTY DEMOCRAT- NEWS, lost his sports editor, he hired the 
mechanical drawing teacher at the high school--which is just a suggestion we are 
passing on to you... Jack Vertrees, WAYNE COUNTY PRESS: "Six below and not even winter 
yet!"... "Irish" McRae notes in his much-used column that the QUINCY HERALD-WHIG, "made" 
the NEW YORKER with this item: "An electric fan valued at $60 was reported stolen 
from the Helpee-Selfee laundry." 

ED AKERS . RANDOLPH COUNTY NEWSPAPERS, made a "flub" that was almost as bad as some 
that appear in the Newsl. Said HARRISON Dilliard, "formerly chief editorial writer 
for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch (Post was omitted) and syndicated columnist for 
Chicago's American," would be the speaker at the annual Woodrow Wilson dinner at Anna. 
..Now Irving Dilliard has been called many things, so he may not object. But what 
about poor Karris on?... Our sports specialist Fred Huff informs us that Harrison 
Dilliard is a colored man, a former Olympic star and is currently public relations 
man for the Cleveland Browns... We suppose Ed's excuse will be that he was so busy 
selling SDCTEEN solid pages for a tabloid-size Christmas supplement that he let some 
news copy slide by. 

LEWIDA REPPERT . ANNA GAZETTE-DEMOCRAT, explained editorially that the cost of down- 
town decorations is being paid for by merchants and is not being added to all of the 
electric bills. She adds, "All this is done in friendliness to you who, they hope, 
Will do your shopping in your home-town stores "...Dorothy Vannier will endorse that. 

NOLAND SEIL , GRAYVILLE MERCURY- INDEPENDENT: "Grayville needs a community resolution 
or two for next year"...Len Johnson, AVA CITIZEN, once panned gold in Oregon.. .Allows 
that he and his partner panned about a quarter's worth in a day— which is one reason 
why he went into the lucrative newspaper business ...Len likes seme of our releases so 
much that he uses them twice in the same issue... The NEW YORK TIMES did the same thing 
once with one of our handouts •• .Oh, it's nothing, really, but some of these stories 
are irresistable, don't you think?. ..You don't? 

LARRY HENRY , MT. VERNON, was a guest at the Info. Service Christmas party, held in the 
C.A. Frazers 1 new luxury home... Larry/ accompanied an Elkville blonde, Linda Giffin, 
who draws a fabulous salary here as a part-time student worker- -enough to buy meals 
for part of each month... Larry's dad is an operator for the REGISTER- NEWS... Larry's 
uncle, Guy, does most of Orian Metcalf 's work in the newsroom. Not all of it, of 
course. Irene Purcell does some... There will be a letter. ..Which reminds, we quoted 
one of Orian's quotes from Baker Brownell's "The Other Illinois," a couple of weeks 
a^j, It was a strongly "negative" statement pertaining to some area eateries... Lest 
yea may have gotten the impression that that was the tone of the whole book, we should 
have pointed out that Brownell is, in fact, one of the area's most enthusiastic 
boosters. In his book, however, he mentioned the "bad" along with the "good",. .It is 
true that many area eating places are not the kind you would look for, but there have 
been tremendous improvements in food and lodging services, and these are continuing... 
Even more significant is the fact that area people tend more and more to think in 
terms of AREA progress. -more- 



Page 5 

THE LETTER requesting sports banners (Page 2) worked Its way into "print" 
prematurely. We meant to explain that it was reprinted not because of the errors 
(there probably isn't an SIEA-er who could do as well in Spanish) but because you 
may have a pennant or two that you would like to send along to help provide 
atmosphere for the "principal hall" of this organization. 

DON'T SPEND your last dime (how ridiculous) on Christmas presents. Sec.-Tres. Ed 
Kirkpatrick is In a frenzy trying to get SIEA dues statements out by the first... 
Don Hecke, hibernating up in Pierre, S.D., managed to find a new shop (offset) fore- 
man. He is Fred Bradley, formerly with Ken Byerly at Lewis town, Mont... Some of you 
may have met Ken at the annual weekly conference which Howard Long has been holding 
for many summers. Don says Francis Modlin (who teaches printing here) would love 
Bradley, "an old sea dog. "...Modlin has thought for years that the Navy won the war. 

WAYNE LEEMAN of P-D fame sends a strange message for the Christmas season. He's 
going to give one of our pix 4 cols, on the state pix page. (That is not strange; 
it's astonishing.) However, he goes on: "...Now for the Newslitter. There were a 
few minor inaccuracies in the item about the Associated Press in St. Louis. Frank's 
first name is Irwin. Merritt, whose first name is Allan, never ran the office, 
'deserted' to the Globe-Democrat. The former SIU grad student is Ben Laime. At 
least that is what Irwin Frank says. 

"Frank, incidentally, is not on the mailing list for the Newslitter, but would 
like to be. Could this be arranged? Oh, yes. A key principle in the teaching of 
journalism is accuracy. Does this apply to the Newslitter, also? (Frank's inquiry.) 1 
(Wayne: First, let me point out that anything I know about journalism I learned 
from Harold Holmes on the CHAMPAIGN NEWS-GAZETTE, who, despite your implications, 
occupies one of the pinnacles in that organization. Second, anyone can make mistakes 
Some can make them better than others. You might have been charitable enough to note 
that this is the first time an error ever has appeared in the Newsl., which is more 
than you can say for the P-D, Elbert Talley notwithstanding. Finally, we can put 
IRVIN Frank on the accredited list, but if he actually reads the Newsl., what will 
this do to the AP?) 

THE JOHN DENSONS . FLORA DAILY NEWS-RECORD, pulled a tricky wrong font deal in 
including their new address on their cards... (520 Vincennes)«..Bill Young, formerly 
with Info. Service and now sports publicity man at the University of Wyoming, writes, 
"Went up into the mountains and chopped a tree. Quite a struggle, but fun"...Mentior 
this because some of you, now loaded with time and money and constantly trying to 
think up something different to do, may next year want to consider getting your trees 
the way Bill did, although for different reasons. He has just built a luxury home 
and didn't have enough cash left for a tree. 

CHRISTMAS CARDS : Because we are so occupied with spinning our wheels nowadays, 
visiting and letter writing are not what they used to be. But the sending of 
Christmas cards, a large scale operation for the past 20 years, give or take a little 
provides to some degree at least a once- a-y ear communication among friends and 
relatives .. .This does , of course, involve some record keeping. Today we received 
a second card from a person from whom we had received one yesterday... Another one 
had a warm, personal note— but no name. • .With our own list at the moment we are 
trying to determine whether a little mark beside the name means we did or did not 
send one to a Chinese graduate student. If we send a second one to this fellow, no 
telling what his reaction will be... The best greetings, of course, are those which 
include something in the way of a personal message in longhand .. .But you just can't 
take time to do that with all of them. ••Anyway, thanks to the many SIEA-ers who did 
send greetings. It's good to be remembered •..The Kinmundy Vallows, bless 'em, 
remembered us with an envelope but no card.. .That's life. You've got to face such 
things.... Wife addressing Christmas cards: "Carlyle, dear, should we send one to the 
Gaines'? We sent them one last year and they didn't send us one so they probably 
won't send us one this year because they'll think we won't send them one because they 
didn't send us one last year, don't you think, or should we?"— CHRISTOPHER PROGRESS... 
...SIEA Jan. 19 i -30- 



From Bill Lyons 12 - 22 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

SIU NEWS SUMMARY 
FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION 

Despite an increase of more than 13-hundred in student enrollment at Southern 
Illinois University, 46 fewer autos have been authorized for student on-campus 
use this year. Edward McDevitt, parking supervisor, says 2-thousand 9-hundred 
15 permits have been issued this fall. Cars have been banned for student use 
on the Carbondale campus since 1957, except for graduate students, undergraduates 
commuting from nearby communities, physically handicapped and other special cases. 
The growing trend to two-car families was noted in the parking registration. 
McDevitt says 2-hundred 75 permits were issued for students and faculty with more 
than one car. 

* * * 

They may not realize it, but high school students in classes from Lake Forest 
south to Paducah, Kentucky are helping to pioneer a new look in English teaching. 
They're the pupils of 42 selected teachers in the area who spent last summer at 
S-I-U in a reappraisal and tentative overhauling of secondary school English 
programs. Georgia Winn, one of three S-I-U English faculty members who directed 
the summer program, notes a "definite spirit of freshness, of experimentation in 
these schools. The teachers have a wider range of approaches to use," she says. 
Missus Winn noted that "not only writing, but writing with a specific purpose is 
being assigned to classes.. .fewer assignments about personal experiences and more 
based on the reading they have done, 

* * * 

An S-I-U researcher has induced ulcers in rats by giving them doses of 
caffeine amounting to about half that in a cup of coffee, George Gass (GOSS), 
associate professor of physiology, says the animals developed stomach ulcers 
within four days after being administered caffeine through stomach tubes. 

* * * 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 22 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

SIU NEWS SUMMARY 
FOR RADIO AND TELEVISION 

Despite an increase of more than 13-hundred in student enrollment at Southern 
Illinois University, 46 fewer autos have been authorized for student on-campus 
use this year. Edward McDevitt, parking supervisor, says 2- thousand 9-hundred 
15 permits have been issued this fall. Cars have been banned for student use 
on the Carbondale campus since 1957, except for graduate students, undergraduates 
commuting from nearby communities, physically handicapped and other special cases, 
The growing trend to two-car families was noted in the parking registration. 
McDevitt says 2-hundred 75 permits were issued for students and faculty with more 
than one car. 

* * * 

They may not realize it, but high school students in classes from Lake Forest 
south to Paducah, Kentucky are helping to pioneer a new look in English teaching. 
They're the pupils of 42 selected teachers in the area who spent last summer at 
S-I-U in a reappraisal and tentative overhauling of secondary school English 
programs. Georgia Winn, one of three S-I-U English faculty members who directed 
the summer program, notes a "definite spirit of freshness, of experimentation in 
these schools. The teachers have a wider range of approaches to use," she says. 
Missus Winn noted that "not only writing, but writing with a specific purpose is 
being assigned to classes... fewer assignments about personal experiences and more 
based on the reading they have done. 

* * * 

An S-I-U researcher has induced ulcers in rats by giving them doses of 
caffeine amounting to about half that in a cup of coffee. George Gass (GOSS), 
associate professor of physiology, says the animals developed stomach ulcers 
within four days after being administered caffeine through stomach tubes. 

* * * 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 20 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



J.J. Paterson, Southern Illinois University associate professor of 
agricultural engineering, has been appointed to a three-year term on the American 
Society of Agricultural Engineers committee on Vocational Agriculture Teacher 
Education. The selection was announced following the Society's annual winter 
meeting in Chicago Dec. 11-14, 

Pater son, Milton Shute and K.A. Thomson, SIU agricultural engineers, were 
among more than 1,900 from the United State and several foreign countries at the 
meeting. 



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From Bill Lyons I 12-20-62 



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SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

SIU COUNTRY COLUMN 
By Albert Meyer 

Quail hunters claiming that southern Illinois fields were too dry this year 
for dogs to find birds had a good point, according to the November weather summary 
just issued by the Southern Illinois University Climatology Laboratory headed by 
Dr. Floyd F # Cunningham. 

The laboratory's tabulation of reports from ten communities in the area 
shows rainfall in November ranged from one to three inches below the long term 
average of three to four inches. Harrisburg and Anna recorded the least amount 
with a November total of only 0.75 and 0.98 inches respectively, as compared to 
long average of 3,32 and 3.97 inches. 

The Benton and McLeansboro stations recorded the heaviest November totals of 
1.42 and 1.84 inches respectively. This is nearly two inches below the long term 
average. Some parts of southern Illinois, especially Anna, Carbondale and Sparta, 
now have an 11-months rainfall deficit of six to nine inches. Other communities, 
such as Benton, Harrisburg, Marion, McLeansboro and Mt. Vernon which had built up 
a surplus during the spotty summer rain storms, still have nearly normal totals for 
the year. 

The lack of rainfall has continued through the first half of December. Not 
only has this drouth been a handicap to quail hunters, but it also has increased 
the danger of forest and field fires and has slowed the growth of ne\7 seedings of 
winter grains and hay and pasture crops. 

Although temperatures skidded to near-record lows during the second week of 
December, thermometer readings remained quite close to the long term average 
during November, according to the summary. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 






12 - 20 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Orientation for new winter quarter students at 
Southern Illinois University will be held Wednesday (Jan, 2). 

Dean I. Clark Davis, director of student affairs, will welcome new students 
at 8 a.m. in Muckelroy Auditorium. The orientation is for freshmen for the 
Carbondale campus, transfer students and those registered at the Vocational -Technical 
Institute. 

Betv7een 500 and 600 new students are expected at SIU for the winter term. 
Each has received a personal letter from a student leader welcoming him to the 
Southern campus conraunity. 

After the opening meeting students who have pre-registered for classes will 
be shown special guidance films and will meet in small groups with student leaders 
and faculty members to discuss study aids, use of the library and any other items 
of interest. 

Students who have not pre-registered will be guided through the process of 
signing for classes, paying fees and getting textbooks. At 4 p.m. men and women 
students will meet separately to hear deans' outline responsibility and opportunity 
at SIU. 

Each of the new students has received a packet from SIU explaining rules, 
procedures and giving details of campus life. The orientation was planned by a 
student steering committee headed by Marian Dean of Collinsville. 

Classes will begin Wednesday evening. 



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From Bill Lyons / l\ 12 - 20 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY ^\ v 

Carbondale, Illinois w* 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

Number 436 in a weekly series -- "It Happened in Southern Illinois" — a series 
consisting of regional folklore and historical accounts suitable for feature, 
column, or editorial use. 

PRAIRIE DU ROCHER 
OBSERVES LA GUIANNEE 
John W, Allen 
Southern Illinois University 

This is written for two purposes. One is to tell briefly of a very old custom 
and how it came to southern Illinois. The other is in a hope that some who read it 
and are interested in ancient customs will go to see La Guiannee in Prairie du Rocher 
on New Year's Eve. 

The French came to settle in the Cahokia-Prairie du Rocher-Kaskaskia region 
about the year 1700, They first established a Catholic mission that now is the 
Church of the Holy Family at Cahokia. This was in 1699. In 1722 they laid out the 
village of Prairie du Rocher. Within a few years they had established another 
settlement, the village of Kaskaskia. A bit of France was being transplanted to the 
Illinois wilderness. 

These settlers brought with them their religious beliefs, superstitions social 
customs, and folk practices. Among these practices was La Guiannee, even then 
centuries old. Records tell definitely of its regular and continuous observance in 
Normandy, a province of northern France, a full 500 years before it came to America. 

La Guiannee came with the French to Canada. As the French spread their 
settlements they took along this old custom. At one time it was widely observed in 
practically all French settlements. Among these were Ste. Genevieve and the lead 
mine regions of Missouri, in Vincennes, Ind., and in their Illinois communities along 
the Mississippi. 

Over the years the custom has declined until it is now observed in a scant 
half-dozen places. Among these is Prairie du Rocher in southern Illinois. Perhaps 
at no other place does the manner of its observance follow the ancient custom more 
faithfully than the little town where it has been celebrated for 240 years, 

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As time for the annual event nears, simple preparations are made. A song 
leader and some musicians are selected. The position of song leader seems to be 
a permanent one, some in the past having served for 25 or 30 years. A group of 
singers is recruited and necessary rehearsals held. Singers likewise hold long 
Services, two being known to have sung with the group for 60 years. 

Shortly after nightfall on the eve of the New Year this group, masked and 
weirdly garbed, gathers to begin its round of calls that follows an established 
pattern. The leader, carrying his cane, leads the way to the front door of the 
first home selected. In a strange but marked quietness he begins tapping time on 
the front step of the house and, accompanied by the musicians, begins to sing. He 
sings the first couplet of the song, which is repeated by the other singers. In 
this manner the first stanza is completed. If the householder welcomes the group, 
and he always does, for it is considered a distinct favor to have them come, the 
door is opened and the singers enter to complete the song. Though the householder 
may be e:q?ecting them he gives every evidence of a delightful surprise. It is a 
plea that the "good master and mistress of the house" make an offering and place it 
in a sack for the needy. This same plea has been made through the long history of 
the celebration, though a bag is no longer carried. 

When the song ends there is a babel of greetings, good wishes, jokes and 
laughter. Drinks that an accompanying MC carefully distributes are served the 
singers. He is careful to see that no one repeats so often that he becomes overly 
"refreshed" or impairs his singing voice. By this manner the group is often singing 
lustily and well far past midnight. The dimly lighted streets, the glowing windows 
and gracious hosts make a delightful combination. After a short time of jollity and 
chatter the singing group and accompanying observers go to the next stopping place 
where the process is repeated. 



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The singing is in a patois, the local speech used there more than 200 years 
ago, The music distinctly folk, is plaintive ani delightful. One does not tire 
of listening, at least the writer who has heai.d it many times over more than 20 
years has never become bored. Each year it seems new. If one can stand in the 
dim light of a snowy winter night and listen to the intriguing music and the 
simple words he does not understand, the occasion will not coon be forgotten* If he 
pauses to think that the nearby rocky bluffs that gave the name Prairie du Rocher, 
''"jield of the Rock", to the village have been echoing back this same strange song 
since 1722, the experience can not fail to leave an enduring impression. 

Why not bundle up and go to look and listen. The people of Prairie du Rocher 
are a genial group and \*elcome those who come to enjoy their ancient custom. So 
far as has been learned you will be attending the ^ldest folk custom continuously 
practiced in America, in fact one of the world's most enduring ones. It may be 
that when the devoted older persons who keep La Guiannee alive have passed on, the 
song will do likewise and no chance to hear it will remain. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone; 453-2276 



s wJ 



12 - 20 - 62 



Release: IMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Planning a New Year's dinner? 

Forget the left-over turkey (pick it off the bone and deep-freeze it until 
later) and instead plan an Alaskan Frosty Cheer or an Hawaiian January Thaw. 

Jan Harper, Southern Illinois University food specialist in the School of Home 
Economics, suggests two menus, one typical of each of our newest states, which will 
perk up appetites jaded by too much Christmas turkey-' n- trimmings, candy, fruitcake 
and nuts. 

If you choose to "go north," she offers Filet of Arctic Char, fortified with 
tiny parsleyed potato balls, broiled whole tomatoes, green beans, artichoke salad 
with crab sauce, and mince pie (made with venison if you're lucky enough to have a 
successful hunter in the family). 

For your information, Mrs. Harper explains, char is a variety of trout, but any 
favorite fish filet would serve. 



FILET OF ARCTIC CHAR 
(4 servings) 



4 8-oz. filets 
2 oz, cooking oil 
24 mushroom heads 
1 pint half-and-half 
% cup flour 
Salt and pepper 



4 shallots, chopped 

% cup lemon juice 

6 tablespoons butter or margarine 

3 tablespoons flour 

% cup slivered blanched almonds 

4 lemon ifedges 



Season fish with salt and pepper and dredge with flour. Fry in oil until golden 
brown on both sides. Remove to serving platter to keep hot. Melt 4 tablespoons 
butter or margarine; add mushrooms, shallots, % teaspoon salt and % cup lemon juice; 
reduce heat and simmer 8 to 10 minutes. Remove mushrooms; add half-and-half and 
thicken with 3 tablespoons of flour blended with enough water to make a thin paste; 
simmer 10 minutes, stirring constantly. Slice mushrooms and add to the sauce. Fry 
almonds in the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter or margarine until golden brown. 
Pour the creamed mushrooms in a large platter, place filets on top, sprinkle with 
remaining lecar juice an.:! top T .7ith browned almonds. Surround with parsleyed potato 
balls and broiled tomatoes. 



CRAB SAUCE 



6 oz. cream cheese, softened 

1 10-oz. can clams 

2 tablespoons prepared horseradish 
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 
Few drops Tabasco sauce 



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% clove garlic, pressed or minced 

1 tablespoon lemon juice 

% teaspoon salt 

1/8 teaspoon black pepper 

Dash paprika 



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Drain liquid from clams and blend it with remaining ingredients, then stir in the 
clams gently. Use liberally over artichokes on bed of coarsely chopped mixed 
greens— lettuce, endive, escargot. 

If you are weary of winter and crave the sunny beaches of Hawaii, Mrs. Harper 

recommends Teriyaki, Polynesian Mingle, Surprise Laulau Finger Salads and Pineapple 

Kabobs. 

TERIYAKI 
(o to 10 portions) 

1 cup soy sauce 3 cloves garlic, pressed 

\ cup red wine 1-inch piece of ginger root or 

\ cup water % teaspoon ground ginger 

2 to 3 tablespoons sugar 3 lbs. sirloin strip, cut into %-incb 
\ teaspoon monosodium glutamate strips 

Oil for frying 
Combine soy sauce, wine, water, sugar, monosodium glutamate, garlic and ginger. Add 
meat slices, marinating for two hours, turning slices occasionally. Remove meat; 
drain. Fry meat in hot oil to desired doneness. 

POLYNESIAN MINGLE 

1% cups cooked rice 4 chicken bouillon cubes 

1% cups celery, sliced diagonally 1 tablespoon soy sauce 

\ cup minced onion 1 teaspoon sugar 

2 10-02. packages frozen peas 1 teaspoon salt 

2 cups water 

Preheat oven to 375°. Dissolve bouillon cubes in boiling water; add soy sauce, 
sugar and salt; stir. Add rice, celery, onion and peas; stir to blend thoroughly. 
Pour into casserole, cover and bake for 30 minutes. E.emove cover, stir again, and 
bake uncovered for 15 minutes. 

SURPRISE LAULAU FINGER SALADS 

Blanch large romaine lettuce leaves (two per serving) in boiling water until stems 
pliable. Cool in large bowl of ice water. Criss-cross each two leaves and place 
small tidbits of crisp fresh vegetables and relishes in the center of each. Pull 
ends up and secure with a twist of green cord or plastic covered wire Store in 
refrigerator on cookie sheet lined with paper towels. 

PINEAPPLE KABOBS 

Alternate pineapple chucks, maraschino cherries, banana chucks and seeded dates on 
skewer sticks, 



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From Bill Lyons cS) /ij ^ 12-20-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY / /J -f ^ 

Carbondale, Illinois C c 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Higher salaries in almost every position, a growing 
demand for the college graduate with good grades and a constantly increasing search 
for the talented student are treads observed in a reviev of employment 
of 1962 Southern Illinois University graduates, made by the University Placement 
Service. 

Dr. Roye Bryant, director of Southern's Placement Service, said 41.4 per cent 
of the 1962 graduates took jobs in the area generally considered as southern 
Illinois. 

Average salary paid the 1962 graduate with technical training who entered 
business or industry was $6,676— an 11 per cent hike over the 1961 average— and the 
non- technically trained graduate in business or industry received an average of 
$5,335— a 4 per cent increase. Beginning teaching salaries increased an average of 
3 per cent over 1961. 

Increase were cited in almost every category, Bryant said. For example, for 
the first time in many years the Placement Service received about as many calls for 
secondary teachers as for elementary teachers. Calls were more than doubled at 
the junior college, college, and university levels, he said. 

Bryant said the demand from business and industry was greatest for engineers, 
accoutants (public and private), chemists, and marketing personnel. Job opportunities 
for college graduates with the Federal Government also are on the increase. 

The report showed 317 interviewers came to SIU's Placement Service to recruit 
teachers and 260 to recruit for positions in agriculture, business, government, 
industry and social work - an increase of 11 per cent in the number of recruiters 
over the last year. Interviewers came from 16 states and the District of Columbia. 

The 1962 graduates accepted spots with business and industry in 29 states, 
30 Illinois counties and seven foreign countries, and teaching positions in 29 
states, 72 Illinois counties and two foreign countries. 

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Further analysis of the graduates and their new jobs showed 44 per cent 
entered teaching, 19.3 took spots with business and industry, 20.1 per cent 
entered graduate school, 9.8 went into military service, 3.7 did not want 
employment, and the others were unreported or had not yet taken positions. 

States attracting the most SIU graduates for all types of positions included 
Illinois (931), Missouri (90), California (25), Indiana (24), Michigan (17), and 
Kentucky, Texas, and New York (11 each). 

Cook county employers hired the largest number of graduates for business and 
industry of Illinois counties (57), follox*ed by Jackson (21), while Jackson topped 
the teaching preference (58), followed by St. Clair (48), Cook (41), Madison (31), 
and Williamson (30). 



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From Bill Lyons ~h ' 12-20-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. « An introductory course in sociology will be offered 
by television by the Extension Division of Southern Illinois University, starting 
Jan. 3, Raymond H. Dey, division dean, has announced. 

To be taught by Douglas Rennie, assistant professor of sociology, the course 
will offer five quarter hours of college credit. It will be aired through the 
facilities of WSIU-TV, Channel 8, with Marshall Allen of the WSIU-TV staff as 
producer-director. Viewing time will be from 7 to 7:30 p.m. each Tuesday and 
Thursday for 12 weeks. 

Area people who are high school graduates or are over 21 years of age are 
eligible to register for the course, Dey said. Registration forms may be obtained 
from the Extension Division Office, and must be completed and returned with tuition 
fee of $31,05 not later than Jan. 12, The tuition fee also includes rental fee for 
the textbook used in the course, which will be nailed to students by the University. 

Students who enroll will be asked to meet with Rennie three times during the 
duration of the course— once early in January to become acquainted with the 
instructor and participate in a question-and-answer session; once for a mid-term 
examination and further questions and answers; and finally for the final examination 
at the end of the course. These sessions will be held on the SIU campus unless there 
should be a large concentration of registrants from a particular area or community, 
Dey said. 

This is the third television course the Extension Division has offered, Dey 
said, and makes it possible for area people to start a college program in their 
own homes. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



12 - 19 - 52 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Textbooks used by Southern Illinois University 
students back when the school was young have been given to the SIU Morris Library 
by the son of an 1882 graduate. 

Library Director Ralph E. McCoy said the books were used by Mrs. Lizzie DeMoss, 
then Lizzie Deardorff from Cobden, who graduated from the two-year teacher education 
institution then called Southern Illinois Normal University. They were presented 
to SIU by her son, Samuel DeMoss of Seattle, Wash. 

Among the volumes, in addition to grammars in Latin and German languages 
and texts in elementary chemistry and zoology, were Peabody's "A Manual of Moral 
Philosophy and Vocal Culture" and "Elocution" by Prof. Robert ICidd. 

The textbook in zoology was written by H. Alleyne Nicholson, whose name on the 
title page was followed by his degrees~"M.D., D.Sc., M.A. , Ph.D., F.R.S.E., F.G.S., 
etc." Pedagogy was derived from two books by James Pyle Uickersham, "Methods of 
Instruction" and "School Economy." 



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From Bill Lyons \ 12-19-62 

SuUXIERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY ^J^Li ( ' ' 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 f- i/ Release: IMMEDIATE 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Among the prized gifts Southern Illinois University 
will count this Christmas is a historian by the name of George Worthington Adams. 
And for Adams, a Christmas in southern Illinois, snow or no, is just dandy. 

Adams is back at SIU as head of the history department after resigning that 
post in 1961 to accept a position as academic vice president and history professor 
at the University of Alaska. The pull of his home state and the SIU campus were 
too much, however. He came back this fall, and was welcomed with open arms. Said 
SIU vice president, John Grinnell, "the George Adamses are few and far between; we 
hated to lose him to begin with and when he talked about returning, I was overjoyed," 

"We missed friends and associations at Carbondale and Southern, which we now 
regard as home," says Adams. "In three years at SIU we had established ties that were 
difficult to break," 

A native of Jacksonville, like his wife, the former Mabel Rogers, Adams taught 
at MacMurray College, Lake Forest College, Harvard and Colorado College before 
becoming European director of the Salzburg Seminar in American Studies in 1954. 
He came to SIU in 1958. At Harvard, where he won master's and doctoral degrees, 
he was dean of university extension, summer school director and secretary of the 
graduate school of arts and sciences, 

"Having been a dean before, I thought I would enjoy the challenge at the 
University of Alaska," Adams said after returning. "But the professional possibilitis. 
at Southern, the administrative complexities at Alaska and outright homesickness 
brought us back," 

As academic dean at Alaska, Adams was responsible for six colleges plus the 
deansof statewide services, the museum, the registrar's office and the library. In 
addition he had to make periodic inspections of branch "community" colleges run by 
the university at Ketchikan, Juno, Palmer and Anchorage, covering vast distances by 
air, 

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"Besides the complexity of such a far flung operation, the cost of maintaining 
a university in Alaska is pretty esrpensive," said Adams. "Plumbers get $72 a day 
and common laborers $5 an hour." 

Adams found "an enormous change" t/hen he came back. The SIU history department 
now has 168 student majors, and by winter term will be teaching 2,700 others ir 
General Studies courses. To handle the teaching load the number of half time 
graduate assistants employed has gone from four, when Adams was last here, to 21 
for the 1963 winter term. 

Eleven years away from retirement himself, Adams is full of optimism about his 
department's future, A doctoral degree program proposal has been approved by the 
University's Graduate Council, and is now being reviewed by outside experts. 

The department's strong suit is American history, with an emphasis on the 
five-state region around Carbondale. Backing it up is a library of 50,000 history 
volumes with another 50,000 appropriate to historical studies. The library's 
collection of regional and western American history and of English history is 
regarded as particularly strong. 

"We would start our PhD. programs with scholars particularly interested in 
these fields," says Adams. "We are now adding more upper-level European history 
courses to broaden the department curriculum." 

Adams is the author of "Doctors in Blue: the Medical History of the Union Army 
in the Civil War," which has gone into a 30,000-copy paperback edition. He is editing 
an abridged version of "An Autobiography of a Soldier's Wife," by Mrs, John A. Logan, 
for the SIU Press, and is reassembling the threads of some old research on the health 
of Civil War prisoners, 

"It's good to be back," says the much-traveled historian and administrator. 
"This time it's for keeps." 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 19 - 52 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — A 21-year-old senior at Southern Illinois University, 
Brenda Spires, Ramsey, has won first prize of $150 in an annual Etherton Trust 
Fund essay contest, it was announced today by the Baptist Foundation. 

The contest, for students at Southern, allowed participants to pick from four 
essay topics. Miss Spires 1 winning paper was written on "Religion Courses in 
State Universities," 

Miss Spires is a mathematics major, minors in sociology, and is a student 
worker in the SIU Information Service, 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 19 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



Three Southern Illinois University faculty members will attend the annual 
meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Philadelphia, 
Dec. 26-31. 

Attending will be Carl Lindegren, chairman of the microbiology department; 
Walter Schmid, assistant professor of botany, and Richard Blackwelder, professor 
of zoology. 

Schmid will attend as the SIU representative for Sigma Xi, professional 
scientific fraternity, and Blackwelder will serve on the council of the Society 
for Systematic Zoology, of which he is past president. 

Clyde Schwartz of Carterville, a research assistant in physiology, also will 
go to the meeting. 



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From Bill Lyons W 12-19-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Lois Becker of Edwardsville, Southern Illinois 
University honor student in Home Economics, could offer a novel excuse if she 
missed a question or two on her last final examination Tuesday (Dec. 13). For 
45 minutes Monday night she was trapped in an elevator in the Home Economics 
building. 

A student janitor on duty heard her shouts and called out the reserves— campus 
police, building maintenance men and Miss Kathleen Jacob, supervisor of the 
Home Management House, a laboratory on the top floor of the building. 

A ladder was lowered to the top of the stalled elevator to rescue Miss Becker. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



12 - 27 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



JOHNSTON CITY, ILL, , Jan. — Registration for three noncredit adult evening 
courses offered by the Southern Illinois University Division of Technical and 
Adult Education and the Johnston City High School will be at 7 p.m. Thursday 
(Jan. 10) in the high school. 

The courses will be Intermediate Typing, Bookkeeping-Accounting I and 
Conversational Spanish. Each will continue for 12 weeks, meeting each Thursday 
evening. 

The typing course will be for persons with previous eicperience who want to 
increase their typing accuracy and speed. The bookkeeping course will be for 
beginners and will deal with correct procedures for keeping a set of books according 
to modern business practices. Each class will meet from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Tuition 
will be $9 for each; textbook fees, $2.25 for typing (for persons not previously 
enrolled in typing) and $4.50 for bookkeeping. 

The language course is designed to provide familiarity with and some fluency 
in conversational Spanish, and is a continuation of an earlier beginning class. 
The class will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. and the tuition fee will be $12. 

Veterans qualifying under the Illinois Military Scholarship program may be 
exempt from tuition fees. At least ten persons must enroll in a course to form 
a class. Remo Castrale, principal of the Johnston City High School, can supply 
additional information. 



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From Bill Lyons 12-27-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Jan.— Robert Rathmacher, native of Walsh and 1962 
graduate of the Southern Illinois University School of Agriculture, has received 
a second place award in the national merit trophy competition of the Block and 
Bridle Club, organization of animal science students with chapters in many 
agricultural colleges. 

As winner of the local chapter merit trophy award last year as the outstanding 
animal industries student in scholastic and leadership activities, Rathmacher 
represented the SIU Block and Bridle Club in the national intercollegiate contest. 
Awards were announced at the organization's national convention in Chicago, He 
currently has an assistantship at Iowa State University where he is studying 
for a master's degree in agriculture. He is the son of Mr, and Mrs, Homer Rathmache 
Walsh, 



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From Bill Lyons 12-27-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



MURPHYSBORO, ILL., Jan. — Registration for a winter series of noncredit 
adult evening courses offered by the Southern Illinois University Division of 
Technical and Adult Education in cooperation with the Murphysboro High School will 
be at 7 p.m* Thursday (Jan. 10) in the high school. The courses, each continuing 
for 12 ifeelcs, will be Driver Training, Sketching, Oil Painting, and Refresher in 
Gregg Shorthand. 

The driver training course will be for adults who want help in qualifying for 
a driver's license. It will include classroom and behind-the-wheel instruction" 
with Russell Bielcert as teacher. The class will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. Mondays. 
Charges will include $14.40 tuition and $3.50 for supplies. 

The sketching course will provide instruction in free-hand draxtfing and will 
be helpful for persons interested in advancing to the use of water colors and oils. 
The oil painting course will be for beginners in using this art medium. Both classes 
will meet from 7 to 10 p.m. Mondays with Robert Cale as teacher. Tuition will be 
$10.80 for each course. 

The shorthand course will be a review and speed-building course for persons 
who are out of practice in the use of shorthand. The class will meet from 7 to 
9 p.m. Mondays. Tuition will be $7.20; the textbook, $2.75. 

At least ten persons must enroll in a course to form a class. Veterans 
qualifying under the Illinois Military Scholarship program may be exempt from 
tuition fees. Additional information may be obtained from Wayne L. Perry, 
principal of the high school, or from the SIU Division of Technical and Adult 
Education. 



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From Bill Lyons ^ ' 12-27-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY ~^ \jJ 

Carbondale, Illinois 3 

Phone: 453-227 S \\ Release: IMMEDIATE 

,\J ]) , 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — More than 300 students from four states have started 
boning up on international issues in preparation for the fifth annual Hodel United 
Nations at Southern Illinois University, Feb. G-9. 

The students from Illinois, Indiana, Missouri and Kentucky will represent 
70 nations including some from behind the Iron Curtain in the meeting devoted to 
study, discussion and debate on Disarmament, Colonialism, Economic Development and 
Finance. 

During the Friday (Feb. 8) and Saturday morning (Feb. 9) sessions committees 
will tackle various problems and draw up resolutions for presentation to the 
general assembly Saturday afternoon. 

David P. Lauerman of (415 S. Railway) Mascoutah, the secretary-general of 
the Model UN, said each country is represented by a four-man delegation. Students 
form delegations on their own initiative and then submit a list of five countries 
they would like to represent. 

After countries are assigned to the delegations the students write to embassies, 
check library sources and study other data for six to eight weeks to become well vers* 
with the culture, political history and problems of the nation they represent. 

Miss Elizabeth Mullins of the SIU office of Student Activities and advisor to 
the Model UN, said the process of learning about a specific nation and then 
representing it in the model sessions is intended to "give students an awareness 
of the problems, philosophy and procedure of communications of each nation and the 
world organization." 

When the Model UN was first held at Southern in 1959 only 20 countries were 
represented compared to this year's 70 nations. The February session is expected 
to attract some 50 students from 15 other colleges and universities in the four-state 
area and approximately 250 from Southern. 

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Lauerraan was named secretary-general by the SIU Student Government and with 
the help of a steering committee appointed members of the committees necessary to 
stage the event. 

Highlight of the session is the appearance of an expert in foreign affairs. 
This year's guest speaker has not been announced. 

The 1963 Model UN will be followed by International Night at the University 
Center sponsored by the Center's programming board. Displays of dress, art, 
music and other types will give visitors an insight into the everyday life of 
nations of the world represented in the SIU student body. The international event 
will be held Saturday night and Sunday and will feature stage shows of the 
performing arts. An International Coffee House will offer coffee and tea during 
the event. 

In addition to Miss Mullins, Dr. Frank Klingberg of the government department 
of SIU also serves as an advisor. All Model United Nations sessions will be held 
in the SIU University Center. 



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From Bill Lyons \ 12-27-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY S r 

Carbondale, Illinois \ 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

Number 437 in a weekly series — "It Happened in Southern Illinois" — a series 
consisting of regional folklore and historical accounts suitable for feature, 
column, or editorial use. 

THE OLD GENERAL STORE 
John U. Allen 
Southern Illinois University 

A good businessman regularly takes inventory. This generally is done about 
New Year, just after the Christmas rush. From information gained he learns the 
value of stock on hand. This helps him to determine the profit or loss he has made. 
This article comes from boyhood observations made in a small-town general store x^here 
the process was employed. 

The building, the nearby warehouse, the stock of goods, and the merchant are 
long since gone. An image of the store, its furniture and fixtures, its confused 
array of goods and the groups of men sitting about the big stove, remains in memory. 

Since this is principally about that long vanished store, it might be well 
first to glance at the social life of the establishment which centered about the 
large woodburning stove that Mr. McPherson, the man of all work, stoked with fire 
wood, cut and hauled in to be "applied on the account" of some customers. 

The stove stood in the midst of a four by eight foot island of sawdust about 
two inches deep. This plot of sawdust was meant to receive the discarded quids of 
chewing tobacco and to protect the floor from poorly aimed streams of ambeer aimed 
at the spittoons parked on the sawdust patch. This patch also was littered with 
long thin shavings that the more expert whittlers removed from short boards and 
dry goods boxes. Even chairposts were not immune. 

Men gathered about this island and stove. Some were customers, others were 

chronic visitors driven inside by cold weather from the benches beneath the nearby 

shade trees or on the store's front porch. Yarns were told and retold, along with 

tall tales and personal experiences. The latest local news was passed along. A 

wee bit of gossip or scandal might occasionally creep in. Current issues were 

discussed, opinions were expressed and solutions proposed, often surprisingly 
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Though these men were frequently untutored they were intelligent, straight 
thinking and didn't depend upon radio or TV for ready-made opinions. Items from 
newspapers sometimes were read aloud, for papers were scarce and many could not 
read. Altogether, they were a reasonably rugged bunch. 

Many items that were inventoried then are curious now. A leather strap would 
hold a cluster of cowbells that now tinkle only in memory. Trace chains, horse 
collars, hames and rope halters that hung on the racks then are rare now. There 
also were sets of leather harness, an occasional saddle, check lines, plowpoints, 
laprings, buggy whips, singletrees, laprobes, and backhands in a motley array. 
There were tin and wooden boxes of axlegrease, and of wool fat used to put a shine 
on horses hoofs and cattle horns. 

Not far from the stove, yet where visitors could not reach into it too easily, 
was the cracker barrel. Then there was the enormous cheese almost two feet in 
diameter and a foot thick with a slicing knife poised like a guillotine above it. 
Cheese and crackers were rated as delicacies. Scattered about the store were 
barrels of rolled hominy, much like bleached corn flakes. Other barrels held 
coffee berries, both green and roasted. The green berries, to be roasted by the 
housewife, were cheaper, sometimes selling for as little as 15 cents a pound. In 
addition to the barreled roasted coffee those wishing to do so could buy packaged 
coffee, either Arbuckle's or McLaughlin's. These were among the first packaged 
named foods. 

On a low rack, generally near the back of the store, there was a row of barrels 
that held sorgum, New Orleans molasses, vinegar, and coal oil. Beneath the 

spigots of these barrels there were more framed patches of sawdust to catch dripping. 

There were barrels, bags, or boxes of bleached, sulphur smoked dried fruits. 
Then there were barrels of flour, rice, black-eyed peas, oatmeal, navy beans, brown 
sugar, and other "staples," These were weighed or measured to meet the customer's 
wishes. 

Cornmeal was sold by the bushel. Then there were shorts and "middlings" that 
have worked themselves into todays cereals. 

This store had gunpowder, bar lead, short, musket caps, felt boots, steelyards, 

sneads, one ounce bottles of quinine for malaria, and carpet warp. It had steel 

traps, window glass, horehound candy, stone fruit jars, churns and milk crocks, red 

striped candy in wide mouthed jars with glass stoppers, licorice sticks and fire 

shovels. 

If only that small-town store, primitive even then, could have been locked that 

day 65 years ago and unlocked this year._ 3 ghat a collector's heaven it would make. 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 27 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY Q Q_ 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

ATTENTION: FARM EDITORS 

SIU COUNTRY COLUMN 
By Albert Meyer 

Most farm machines should be in storage during winter months, but most farmers 
keep at least one tractor in use for a variety of jobs, such as cleaning barnlots, 
grinding and hauling feed, and other farm chores* In such instances, the tractor 
needs special preparation and care for winter use, says J.J. Pater son, Southern 
Illinois University agricultural engineer. 

Proper attention to the lubricating system is especially important. Following 
the manufacturer's recommendations on the kinds and grades of crankcase and 
transmission lubricants is best. Lightweight oils of good quality will do a better 
lubricating job in cold weather than heavier grade oils. 

Getting the tractor ready for winter use calls for an oil change and a good 
grease job, using winter grade lubricants. The tractor motor should be warmed up 
well before draining the crankcase so that sludge and dirt will flow out with the 
oil, making it less necessary to flush the crankcase before putting in the new oil. 
At the same time the farmer should put in a new oil filter. 

Using a good quality permanent- type antifreeze in the cooling system will save 
a lot of time if the tractor will be used quite frequently during the winter. It 
also will eliminate the danger of a cracked engine block from a frozen cooling 
system if the farmer should forget to drain the water during a sudden cold wave. 
Using a cover over the radiator will cut down on cold blasts of air on the engine 
during winter driving and keep the motor running more as it does during warm weather, 

A good battery is necessary for winter starting and operation. Dirt and 
corrosion may be cleaned from the battery and connections with warm water and 
baking soda, A little vaseline on the terminal posts will reduce corrosion. Test 
the acid and keep the battery well charged to make engine starting easier and to 
keep the battery from freezing in cold weather, Paterson cautions, 

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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



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12 - 27 - 62 
Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Anything from the skin and poison crystals of a 
rattlesnake to intrigue young boys.., to the lovely luna moth or an Arabian doll 
to captivate a little girl... 

These and hundreds of other objects— real, modeled in natural colors or 
depicted in slides or photographs— can be borrowed by teachers from the Southern 
Illinois University Museum to bring a breath of realism to textbook descriptions. 

Dozens of units of loan materials have been assembled by Dr. Esther Bennett, 
educational curator, which may be borrowed for two-week periods for classroom 
teaching or exhibition, ,! 0r," she says, "teachers may visit the Museum and help 
assemble a 'custom-built 1 exhibit for whatever purpose they have in mind." 

The exhibits on pioneer life include units of transportation— such things as 
a "lizard" or log-skidding sled, a log wagon, a corduroy road; lighting— candle 
mold, candle lantern, candle-making kit; weaving, from the cotton boll to the loom 
on which calico was woven; houses ranging from the old-time "house-raising" of 
pioneer days to a modern Crab Orchard house; household items such as a bundle bed 
of the early American era, a gourd dipper, horn spoon and portable food warmer; a 
copper- toed shoe and an ash-hopper for making home-made lye soap. 

Dolls authentically costumed show many of the indigenous cultures of America- 
pioneers, Indians, Pennsylvania Amish— and also those of foreign lands from Africa 
and Austria to Russia and the South Seas, 

Animal units embrace the tiny elemental protozoa, sponges and corals, the 
trap door spider, fish, frogs, snakes, the skin of a gila monster, a painted turtle, 
a mole, a wood chuck, and skunk, and birds from the blue jay and cardinal to the 
loggerhead shrike. 

Other loan exhibit materials include panels of rocks, minerals and mineral 
products, fossils, plastic models of cave men, Indian artifacts, slides, pictures 
and science aids, -li- 



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Sociologists Herman Lantz and Eloise Snyder, department colleagues at Southern 

Illinois University, have teamed for a new book on "Marriage" which stresses 

psychological factors necessary to happy home life. The collaboration is the 

result of five years of research, including student attitudes gathered from 

marriage and family courses at SIU. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 12 - 26 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 26 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Real people, not frauds, are the best candidates for 
happy marriages. 

It may sound fundamental, but that— in simple terms--is the formula agreed upon 
by the authors of a book on marriage, a collaboration between two sociologists at 
Southern Illinois University. 

Published by John Wiley and Sons of New York, "Marriage" brings the domestic 
scene into a sharp psychological focus. Say the authors, Herman Lantz and 
Eloise Snyder, "we weren't interested in giving tips on home management, family 
budgeting, consumer problems or how to raise kids. Most college texts do that. We 
were concerned with interpersonal relationships and the socio-psychological approach 
to marriage, particularly motivations." 

Filled with case histories and used in its pre-publication form in marriage 
and parenthood courses at SIU, the book owes some of its content to years of 
discussion with students over such problems as dating, courtship and sex. 

The authors say courtship problems repeatedly brought up by students ("I need 
a date," "Does she really mean it?") are not the real concerns of a person 
intelligently considering marriage. 

They say that students of both sexes think they are being exploited by the other 
in courtship relations, and that the problem of "sincerity" or "seriousness" is one 
of the foremost preoccupations of college daters. 

"The important thing in marriage," say the authors, "is that it results from 
a meaningful or mature love relationship. Much marital chaos is simply the result of 
individual personality problems brought into the marriage, and by the failure to 
recognize them beforehand." 



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Lantz is blunt about it: "Immature love can be disastrous." He says the 
"mature love" recommended in "Marriage" is based on reality, and is conducive to 
the development of the individuals concerned, 

"Real people, mature people, reveal their hopes, their fears and interests 
to one another. Immature love is characterized by deception, hiding and 
fraudulent behavior." 

Lantz, who came to SIU from Ohio State in 1950, has specialized in the 
sociology of marriage and courtship. He is a research fellow of Harvard's Center 
for the Study of Liberty in America and is now deep in a socio-historic study of 
Cairo-- "a community that failed to grow"— under a grant from the Center. 

Miss Snyder is a Pennsylvania State University doctoral degree graduate 
whose research field also covers the sociology of law and social gerontology. 

She has a pat answer when asked how an unmarried person can be an authority 
on marriage: "I have a friend who's a criminologist. I don't think he's ever 
been arrested." 



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From Bill Lyons \ ' 1 12-26-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Registration for a new winter term series of adult 
evening short courses offered at Southern Illinois University's Carbondale and 
Southern Acres campuses by the Division of Technical and Adult Education will be 
Wednesday evening (Jan. 2) in Carbondale and Thursday evening (Jan. 3) at the 
Vocational Technical Institute, according to Harry B. Bauernfeind, assistant dean 
of the division. 

Seventeen courses are scheduled for the Carbondale campus. Registration will 
be from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in Room 41, University School. The enrollment for 11 course 
at the VTI will be from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday in Room 6 of the Classroom 
Building. All classes will continue for 10 weeks. 

Courses being offered at the Carbondale campus, the time of class meeting and 
fees are: 

Beginning Typewriting; 7-9:30 p.m. Mondays; $7.50 tuition and $2.25 textbook fee 

Intermediate Typewriting; 7-9:30 p.m. Wednesdays; $7: 50 tuition, $2.25 textbook 
fee (if not previously enrolled in typing), and $1.50 workbook fee. 

Beginning Shorthand; 7-9:30 p.m. Tuesdays; $7.50 tuition and $3 textbook fee. 

Intermediate Shorthand; 7-9:30 p.m. Mondays; $7.50 tuition and $3 textbook fee 
(if not previously enrolled in shorthand courses). 

Shorthand Review and Transcription; 7-9:30 p.m. Thursdays; $7.50 tuition and 
$3.25 textbook fee. 

Calculating Machines I or II; 7-9:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays; $15 tuition 
and $1.25 textbook fee (only for course I). 

Bookkeeping-Accounting II; 7-9:30 p.m. Wednesdays; $7.50 tuition, $3.50 
textbook fee (for those not previously enrolled) and $1.50 for workbook. 

Clerical and Civil Service Training; 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays; $5 tuition and $1.50 

for workbooks. 

Wills and Trusts for Laymen; 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays; $8 tuition. 

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Conversational French; 7-9 p.m. Mondays; $8 tuition and $2.95 textbook fee. 

Conversational Spanish; 7-9 p.m. Thursdays; $8 tuition and $2.95 textbook fee 
(for those not enrolled in first class). 

Psychology of Human Relations; 7-9 p.m. Thursdays; $8 tuition and $1 textbook fee 

Intermediate Clothing Construction; 7-9 p.m. Thursdays; $9 tuition fee. 

Tailoring; 7-10 p.m. Tuesdays; $9 tuition fee. 

Intermediate Interior Decorating; 7-10 p.m. Tuesdays; $9 tuition fee. 

Oil Painting; 7-10 p.m. Tuesdays; $9 tuition fee. 

Advanced Creative Writing; 7-9 p.m. Wednesdays; $6 tuition fee. 

The following courses will be offered at the VTI campus: (fees will be the same, 
as above for identical courses) 

Beginning Typewriting; 7-9:30 p.m. Tuesdays. 

Intermediate Typewriting; 7-9:30 p.m. Mondays. 

Beginning Shorthand; 7-9:30 p.m. Thursdays. 

Intermediate Shorthand; 7-9:30 p.m. Wednesdays. 

Bookkeeping-Accounting II; 7-9:30 p.m. Thursdays. 

Clerical and Civil Service Training; 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays. 

Intermediate Machine Shorthand; 7-9 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays; $12 tuition. 

Machine Drafting I or II; 7-9:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays; $15 tuition. 

Intermediate Arc Welding; 7-10 p.m. Mondays or Wednesdays; $10.80 tuition and 
$7 supply fee. 

Beginning Gas Welding; 7-10 p.m. Fridays; $10,80 tuition and $7 supply fee. 

Veterans qualifying under the Illinois Military Scholarship program and SIU 
staff members may be exempt from tuition fees. Persons may pre-register or obtain 
additional information from the technical and adult education office, 403 West Mill, 
Carbondale, Bauernfeind says. 



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A NEWLY ESTABLISHED scholarship award of $250 for a senior Southern Illinois 

University student planning to enter the field of social service work is presented 

to Alvin Ross Frasier (second from left) of Cutler during the Illinois Welfare 

Association District 10 meeting at SIU. Others in the photo, left to right, include: 

Arthur A. Swanson, director of student financial assistance at Southern, Frasier, 

J.M. Kilbreth of Metropolis, chairman of the district association, and 

Mrs. Ruth H. McKeown of Carbondale, scholarship committee chairman of the District 

Welfare group. The district organization plans to make a similar award each year 

to a student majoring in either sociology or psychology. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 12-26-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




12 - 26 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Southern Illinois University graduate fellowships 
have been granted to three students for the winter and spring terms David Kenney, 
assistant dean of the Graduate School said today. 

The fellowships, which are granted for high scholarship, carry a stipend of 
$150 a month and remission of tuition fees. Kenney said the three award winners 
join about 40 other SIU fellowship winners presently doing graduate work. 

Recipients of the grants include: 

CARBONDALE: William F. Gale, zoology major of 803 N. Bridge St. 

Dayton L. Thomas, agricultural industries major of R.R. 4. 

WEST SALEM: Robert C. Matthes, agricultural industries major of R.R. 3. 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




12 - 26 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec, -- An exhibition of sculpture by David Smith, a pioneer 
in welded iron and steel constructions, will go on public display Jan. 4 at 
Southern Illinois University's Mitchell Gallery, 

Assembled by the Museum of Modern Art in New York with a grant from the CBS 
Foundation, the show includes 46 sculptures, spanning Smith's output from 1933 to 
1960. The exhibition will continue through Jan. 24, 

One of the important innovators in contemporary American sculpture, Smith 
worked as a riveter and welder in the midwest before beginning his career as an 
artist in 1926. He received his first one-man sculpture show in 1938 and has 
exhibited extensively in the U.S. and Europe since then. 

Benjamin Watkins, acting curator of exhibits the SIU Galleries, said the show 
"is one of the most important exhibitions we have obtained for SIU," 



-pb- 



From Bill Lyons / 12-26-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

PITTSFIELD, ILL., Dec. — Registration will be at 7 p.m. Wednesday (Jan. 9) 
in the Pitts field High School for a winter series of noncredit adult evening courses 
offered by the Southern Illinois University Division of Technical and Adult Education 
in cooperation with the high school. 

The courses will include a three-part review series in English Fundamentals, 
Mathematics and Reading Comprehension lasting a total of 18 weeks; and three 12-weekc 
courses: Beginning Typing, Bookkeeping- Accounting II, and Woodworking for the 
Householder. At least ten persons must enroll in a course to form a class. 

The English, mathematics and reading review courses will have special interest 
for persons planning to take General Educational Development tests to qualify for 
high school equivalency certificates. The classes will meet from 7 to 10 p.m. 
Thursdays. Persons may register for one or more of these courses. Tuition fees 
will be $7 for one part, $10 for two, or $12 for all three, plus $3.75 for a workbooV 
and other supplies. Additional information may be obtained from Eldon Atwood, 
Pike County superintendent of schools. 

Information about the other courses may be obtained from Richard Heitholt, 
Pittsfield High School principal. 

The typing class will be for persons who want to learn to operate a typewriter 
with accuracy and some speed. The class will meet from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Mondays with 
Charles Pinkerton as teacher. Charges will be $9 tuition and $2.25 for a textbook. 

The bookkeeping course will deal with more advanced record keeping methods and 

follows the beginning course. The class will meet from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Thursdays 

with Pinkerton as instructor. Charges will be $9 tuition, $1.50 for a workbook, and 

$3.50 for a textbook, if not obtained for the beginning course. 

The woodworking course will deal with safe use of power tools, making working 
drawings, making correct joints and wood finishes, and building or repairing 
household items. The class will meet from 7 to 10 p.m. Mondays with Edward Mitchell 
as teacher. Tuition will be $10.80. 

Veterans qualifying under the Illinois Military Scholarship program may be 
exempt from tuition fees. 

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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




12 - 26 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Claude Shaver, director of the University Theatre 
at Louisiana State University, will be visiting professor of theatre at Southern 
Illinois University during the winter and spring terms. 

Shaver is the second theatre specialist appointed this year to serve as a 
replacement for Archibald McLeod, department chairman who is lecturing in India 
on a Fulbright grant, Frederick O'Neal, New York stage and television performer, 
taught at SIU during the fall quarter, 

A native of Kirksville, Mo,, Shaver has been an editor of the Southern Speech 
Journal and drama and theatre editor for the Quarterly Journal of Speech, He has 
contributed to books and encyclopedias in the fields of theatre production, 
history and drama teaching, and also has been a playwright and performer. 

At SIU, Shaver will teach a winter term graduate seminar in theatre arts 
and a course in play directing. During the spring term he will give an advanced 
directing course and another in the aesthetics of drama and theatre. 



-pb- 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 20 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



I. Clark Davis, director of student affairs at Southern Illinois University, 
has been elected to the executive committee of Phi Eta Sigma, national scholastic 
honorary fraternity for freshman men. 

Re-elected grand president of the society at its annual convention at Indiana 
University was C.M. Thompson, former school of commerce dean at the University of 
Illinois. He was the winner of SIU's Distinguished Service Award in 1959. 



-pb- 



Pianist Robert Mueller and cellist Peter Spurbeck will open the winter term 
series of Sunday afternoon faculty recitals at Southern Illinois University 
Jan. 6 with a program of three sonatas. 

To begin at 4 p.m. in Shryock Auditorium, the public recital will include 
Bach's "Sonata No. 2 in D Major"; Brahms 1 "Sonata No. 1 in E minor" and the 
"Sonata No. 2 in F minor" by Bohuslav Martinu. 

Spurbeck, formerly of Northern Illinois University, joined the music 
department faculty this fall. Mueller is department chairman. 



-pb- 





















.' 



From Bill Lyons 12-28-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. « Donna Kratzner of Flora (524 E. Second), a senior 
music student at Southern Illinois University, will be presented in a recital 
Jan, 13 at Shryock Auditorium. The 4 p.m. program, to be given by Miss Kratzner 
in fulfillment of bachelor of music degree requirements, will be open to the public. 

A former Centralian, Miss Kratzner is a scholarship student at SIU and has 
won the Presser Foundation Music Award for the past three years. She has maintained 
dean's list academic standards and has been the chief accompanist for many music 
department stage productions. She also has been accompanist for the University 
Men's Glee Club and has sung with the Madrigal Singers and University Choir. 

Miss Kratzner will play Bach's "Concerto in the Italian Style"; Brahms' 
"Rhapsody, Op, 79"; Liszt's "Consolation III"; Chopin's "Premiere Ballade," 
and a major work by French modernist Franics Poulenc, "Les Soirees de Nazelles." 



-pb- 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 23 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



Dr. J. Murray Lee, chairman of the department of elementary education, 
Southern Illinois University, is one of 30 specialists invited to attend a National 
Education Association conference January 10-13 in Washington, D.C. He will 
represent the National Association for Supervision in Curriculum and Development. 

Purpose of the conference is to prepare a statement on vital issues concerned 
with the improvement of elementary education. 



-30- 



From Bill Lyons 12 - 28 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL. , Dec. -- A series of area meetings to acquaint teachers 
and administrators with educational television offerings will be conducted in 
January by the Southern Illinois Instructional Telvision Association. 

Coordinator Carl Planinc said the meetings will be on Jan. 9 at Marion Junior 
High; Jan, 10 at Murphysboro High; Jan. 16 at Casey Junior High in Mt. Vernon, 
and Jan. 17 at Freeburg Elementary School, 

Each meeting will start at 4:30 p.m. and will include a history of educational 
TV in southern Illinois, a panel discussion, a demonstration TV program and a 
question and ansxrer period. 

Planinc said one purpose of the sessions is to develop interest and participation 
in the SIITA programs offered over WSIU-TV at Southern Illinois University. The 
second semester of classroom telecasts will begin Jan. 23, 

Planinc said 17,955 southern Illinois elementary and high school students 
attended TV classes during the first semester, based on returns from teachers 
evaluating the courses. The most widely used programs were those in art and music 
for the primary grades* 



-pb- 



Southern Illinois University readies a TV course to begin Thursday night, 

Jan. 3, over WSIU-TV, channel 3. The introductory course in sociology will be 

taught by Douglas Rennie, left, who is shown here explaining seme of his visual 

materials to Raymond H. Dey, director of the University Extension Division, which 

is offering the course. Students may earn four credit hours for the course, which 

will be aired each Tuesday and Thursday nights for 12 weeks, from 7 to 7:30 p.m. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 12-28-62 

SOUTHERN ILLIHOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 






• 












. 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 27 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Anything from the skin and poison crystals of a 
rattlesnake to intrigue young boys... to the lovely luna moth or an Arabian doll 
to captivate a little girl... 

These and hundreds of other objects— real, modeled in natural colors or 
depicted in slides or photographs— can be borrowed by teachers from the Southern 
Illinois University Museum to bring a breath of realism to textbook descriptions. 

Dozens of units of loan materials have been assembled by Dr. Esther Bennett, 
educational curator, which may be borrowed for two-week periods for classroom 
teaching or exhibition. "Or," she says, "teachers may visit the Museum and help 
assemble a 'custom-built' exhibit for whatever purpose they have in mind." 

The exhibits on pioneer life include units of transportation— such things as 
a "lizard" or log-skidding sled, a log wagon, a corduroy road; lighting— candle 
mold, candle lantern, candle-making kit; weaving, from the cotton boll to the loom 
on which calico was woven; houses ranging from the old-time "house-raising" of 
pioneer days to a modern Grab Orchard house; household items such as a bundle bed 
of the early American era, a gourd dipper, horn spoon and portable food warmer; a 
copper-toed shoe and an ash-hopper for making home-made lye soap. 

Dolls authentically costumed show many of the indigenous cultures of America- 
pioneers, Indians, Pennsylvania Amish— and also those of foreign lands from Africa 
and Austria to Russia and the South Seas. 

Animal units embrace the tiny elemental protozoa, sponges and corals, the 
trap door spider, fish, frogs, snakes, the skin of a gila monster, a painted turtle, 
a mole, a wood chuck, and skunk, and birds from the blue jay and cardinal to the 
loggerhead shrike. 

Other loan exhibit materials include panels of rocks, minerals and mineral 
products, fossils, plastic models of cave men, Indian artifacts, slides, pictures 
and science aids, -li- 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 27 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

ATTENTION: FARM EDITORS 

SIU COUNTRY COLUMN 
By Albert Meyer 

Most farm machines should be in storage during winter months, but most farmers 
keep at least one tractor in use for a variety of jobs, such as cleaning barnlots, 
grinding and hauling feed, and other farm chores. In such instances, the tractor 
needs special preparation and care for winter use, says J.J. Paterson, Southern 
Illinois University agricultural engineer. 

Proper attention to the lubricating system is especially important. Following 
the manufacturer's recommendations on the kinds and grades of crankcase and 
transmission lubricants is best. Lightweight oils of good quality will do a better 
lubricating job in cold weather than heavier grade oils. 

Getting the tractor ready for winter use calls for an oil change and a good 
grease job, using winter grade lubricants. The tractor motor should be warmed up 
well before draining the crankcase so that sludge and dirt will flow out with the 
oil, making it less necessary to flush the crankcase before putting in the new oil. 
At the same time the farmer should put in a new oil filter. 

Using a good quality permanent-type antifreeze in the cooling system will save 
a lot of time if the tractor will be used quite frequently during the winter. It 
also will eliminate the danger of a cracked engine block from a frozen cooling 
system if the farmer should forget to drain the water during a sudden cold wave. 
Using a cover over the radiator will cut down on cold blasts of air on the engine 
during winter driving and keep the motor running more as it does during warm weather. 

A good battery is necessary for winter starting and operation. Dirt and 
corrosion may be cleaned from the battery and connections with warm water and 
baking soda. A little vaseline on the terminal posts will reduce corrosion. Test 
the acid and keep the battery well charged to make engine starting easier and to 
keep the battery from freezing in cold weather, Paterson cautions. 

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From Bill Lyons 12 - 27 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 

Number 437 in a weekly series — "It Happened in Southern Illinois" — a series 
consisting of regional folklore and historical accounts suitable for feature, 
column, or editorial use, 

THE OLD GENERAL STORE 
John I J. Allen 
Southern Illinois University 

A good businessman regularly takes inventory. This generally is done about 
New Year, just after the Christmas rush. From information gained he learns the 
value of stock on hand. This helps him to determine the profit or loss he has made. 
This article comes from boyhood observations made in a small-town general store where 
the process was employed. 

The building, the nearby warehouse, the stock of goods, and the merchant are 
long since gone. An image of the store, its furniture and fixtures, its confused 
array of goods and the groups of men sitting about the big stove, remains in memory. 

Since this is principally about that long vanished store, it might be well 
first to glance at the social life of the establishment which centered about the 
large woodburning stove that Mr, McPherson, the man of all work, stoked with fire 
wood, cut and hauled in to be "applied on the account" of some customers. 

The stove stood in the midst of a four by eight foot island of sawdust about 
two inches deep. This plot of sawdust was meant to receive the discarded quids of 
chewing tobacco and to protect the floor from poorly aimed streams of ambeer aimed 
at the spittoons parked on the sawdust patch. This patch also was littered with 
long thin shavings that the more expert whittlers removed from short boards and 
dry goods boxes. Even chairposts were not immune. 

Men gathered about this island and stove. Some were customers, others were 
chronic visitors driven inside by cold weather from the benches beneath the nearby 
shade trees or on the store's front porch. Yarns were told and retold, along with 
tall tales and personal experiences. The latest local news was passed along, A 
wee bit of gossip or scandal might occasionally creep in. Current issues were 
discussed, opinions were expressed and solutions proposed, often surprisingly 
logical ones. -more- 



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Though these men were frequently untutored they were intelligent, straight 
thinking and didn't depend upon radio or TV for ready-made opinions. Items from 
newspapers sometimes i^ere read aloud, for papers were scarce and many could not 
read. Altogether, they were a reasonably rugged bunch. 

Many items that were inventoried then are curious now. A leather strap would 
hold a cluster of cowbells that now tinkle only in memory. Trace chains, horse 
collars, hames and rope halters that hung on the racks then are rare now. There 
also were sets of leather harness, an occasional saddle, check lines, plowpoints, 
laprings, buggy whips, singletrees, laprobes, and backhands in a motley array. 
There were tin and wooden boxes of axlegrease, and of wool fat used to put a shine 
on horses hoofs and cattle horns. 

Not far from the stove, yet where visitors could not reach into it too easily, 
was the cracker barrel. Then there was the enormous cheese almost two feet in 
diameter and a foot thick with a slicing knife poised like a guillotine above it. 
Cheese and crackers were rated as delicacies. Scattered about the store were 
barrels of rolled hominy, much like bleached corn flakes. Other barrels held 
coffee berries, both green and roasted. The green berries, to be roasted by the 
housewife, were cheaper, sometimes selling for as little as 15 cents a pound. In 
addition to the barreled roasted coffee those wishing to do so could buy packaged 
coffee, either Arbuckle's or McLaughlin's. These were among the first packaged 
named foods. 

On a low rack, generally near the back of the store, there was a row of barrels 
that held sorgum, New Orleans molasses, vinegar, and coal oil. Beneath the 

spigots of these barrels there were more framed patches of sawdust to catch dripping; 

There were barrels, bags, or boxes of bleached, sulphur smoked dried fruits. 
Then there were barrels of flour, rice, black-eyed peas, oatmeal, navy beans, brown 
sugar, and other "staples." These were weighed or measured to meet the customer's 
wishes. 

Cornmeal was sold by the bushel. Then there were shorts and "middlings" that 
have worked themselves into todays cereals. 

This store had gunpowder, bar lead, short, musket caps, felt boots, steelyards, 

sneads, one ounce bottles of quinine for malaria, and carpet warp. It had steel 

traps, xfindow glass, horehound candy, stone fruit jars, churns and milk crocks, red 

striped candy in wide mouthed jars with glass stoppers, licorice sticks and fire 

shovels. 

If only that small- town store, primitive even then, could have been locked that 

day 65 years ago and unlocked this year. ~H£at a collector's heaven it would make. 



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From Bill Lyons 12-27-62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phnne: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



MURPHYSBORO, ILL., Jan. — Registration for a winter series of noncredit 
adult evening courses offered by the Southern Illinois University Division of 
Technical and Adult Education in cooperation with the Murphysboro High School will 
be at 7 p.m. Thursday (Jan. 10) in the high school. The courses, each continuing 
for 12 weeks, will be Driver Training, Sketching, Oil Painting, and Refresher in 
Gregg Shorthand. 

The driver training course will be for adults who want help in qualifying for 
a driver's license. It will include classroom and behind-the-wheel instruction 
with Russell Biekert as teacher. The class will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. Mondays, 
Charges will include $14.40 tuition and $3.50 for supplies. 

The sketching course will provide instruction in free-hand drawing and will 
be helpful for persons interested in advancing to the use of water colors and oils. 
The oil painting course will be for beginners in using this art medium. Both classes 
will meet from 7 to 10 p.m. Mondays with Robert Cale as teacher. Tuition will be 
$10.30 for each course. 

The shorthand course will be a review and speed-building course for persons 
who are out of practice in the use of shorthand. The class will meet from 7 to 
9 p.m. Mondays. Tuition will be $7,20; the teKtbook, $2.75, 

At least ten persons must enroll in a course to form a class. Veterans 
qualifying under the Illinois Military Scholarship program may be exempt from 
tuition fees. Additional information may be obtained from Wayne L. Perry, 
principal of the high school, or from the SIU Division of Technical and Adult 
Education, 



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From Bill Lyons 12 - 27 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Jan.— Robert Rathmacher, native of Walsh and 1962 
graduate of the Southern Illinois University School of Agriculture, has received 
a second place award in the national merit trophy competition of the Block and 
Bridle Club, organization of animal science students with chapters in many 
agricultural colleges. 

As winner of the local chapter merit trophy award last year as the outstanding 
animal industries student in scholastic and leadership activities, Rathmacher 
represented the SIU Block and Bridle Club in the national intercollegiate contest. 
Awards were announced at the organization's national convention in Chicago. He 
currently has an assistantship at Iowa State University where he is studying 
for a master's degree in agriculture. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Homer Rathmache 
Walsh. 



-am- 



From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



12 - 27 « 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



JOHNSTON CITY, ILL., Jan. — Registration for three noncredit adult evening 
courses offered by the Southern Illinois University Division of Technical and 
Adult Education and the Johnston City High School will be at 7 p.m. Thursday 
(Jan. 10) in the high school. 

The courses will be Intermediate Typing, Bookkeeping-Accounting I and 
Conversational Spanish. Each will continue for 12 weeks, meeting each Thursday 
evening. 

The typing course xfill be for persons with previous escperience who want to 
increase their typing accuracy and speed. The bookkeeping course will be for 
beginners and will deal with correct procedures for keeping a set of books according 
to modern business practices. Each class will meet from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Tuition 
will be $9 for each; textbook fees, $2.25 for typing (for persons not previously 
enrolled in typing) and $4.50 for bookkeeping. 

The language course is designed to provide familiarity with and some fluency 
in conversational Spanish, and is a continuation of an earlier beginning class. 
The class will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. and the tuition fee will be $12. 

Veterans qualifying under the Illinois Military Scholarship program may be 
exempt from tuition fees. At least ten persons must enroll in a course to form 
a class, llemo Castrale, principal of the Johnston City High School, can supply 
additional information. 



-am- 









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Southern Illinois University readies a TV course to begin Thursday night, 

Jan. 3, over WSIU-TV, channel 3. The introductory course in sociology will be 

taught by Douglas Rennie, left, who is shown here explaining seme of his visual 

materials to Raymond H. Dey, director of the University Extension Division, which 

is offering the course. Students may earn four credit hours for the course, which 

will be aired each Tuesday and Thursday nights for 12 weeks, from 7 to 7:30 p.m. 

PHOTO BY PHOTO SERVICE 12 - 28 - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 

Carbondale, Illinois 

Phone: 453-2276 Release: IMMEDIATE 



From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



SO 

A/ 



12 - 23 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — A series of area meetings to acquaint teachers 
and administrators with educational television offerings will be conducted in 
January by the Southern Illinois Instructional Telvision Association. 

Coordinator Carl Planinc said the meetings will be on Jan. 9 at Marion Junior 
High; Jan. 10 at Murphysboro High; Jan. 16 at Casey Junior High in Mt. Vernon, 
and Jan c 17 at Freeburg Elementary School. 

Each meeting will start at 4:30 p.m. and will include a history of educational 
TV in southern Illinois, a panel discussion, a demonstration TV program and a 
question and answer period. 

Planinc said one purpose of the sessions is to develop interest and participation 
in the SIITA programs offered over WSIU-TV at Southern Illinois University. The 
second semester of classroom telecasts will begin Jan. 28, 

Planinc said 17,955 southern Illinois elementary and high school students 
attended TV classes during the first semester, based on returns from teachers 
evaluating the courses. The most widely used programs were those in art and music 
for the primary grades. 



-pb- 




T 



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From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 



12 - 23 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



Dr. J. Murray Lee, chairman of the department of elementary education, 
Southern Illinois University, is one of 30 specialists invited to attend a National 
Education Association conference January 10-13 in Washington, D,C. He will 
represent the National Association for Supervision in Curriculum and Development, 

Purpose of the conference is to prepare a statement on vital issues concerned 
with the improvement of elementary education. 



-30- 



From Bill Lyons 
SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY 
Carbondale, Illinois 
Phone: 453-2276 




12 - 28 - 62 



Release: IMMEDIATE 



CARBONDALE, ILL., Dec. — Donna Kratzner of Flora (524 E. Second), a senior 
music student at Southern Illinois University, will be presented in a recital 
Jan. 13 at Shryock Auditorium. The 4 p.m. program, to be given by Miss Kratzner 
in fulfillment of bachelor of music degree requirements, will be open to the public. 

A former Centralian, Miss Kratzner is a scholarship student at SIU and has 
won the Presser Foundation Music Award for the past three years. She has maintained 
dean's list academic standards and has been the chief accompanist for many music 
department stage productions. She also has been accompanist for the University 
Men's Glee Club and has sung with the Madrigal Singers and University Choir. 

Miss Kratzner will play Bach's "Concerto in the Italian Style"; Brahms' 
"Rhapsody, Op. 79"; Liszt's "Consolation III"; Chopin's "Premiere Ballade," 
and a major work by French modernist Franics Poulenc, "Les Soirees de Nazelles." 



-pb" 






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From Bill Lyons ■^]S 12 - 2G - 62 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY %p^ 

Carbondale, Illinois (J >-n 

Phone: 453-2276 ( — Release: IMMEDIATE 



I. Clark Davis, director of student affairs at Southern Illinois University, 
has been elected to the executive committee of Phi Eta Sigma, national scholastic 
honorary fraternity for freshman men. 

Re-elected grand president of the society at its annual convention at Indiana 
University was C.M. Thompson, former school of commerce dean at the University of 
Illinois. He was the winner of SIU's Distinguished Service Award in 1959. 



-pb- 



Pianist Robert Mueller and cellist Peter Spurbeck will open the winter term 
series of Sunday afternoon faculty recitals at Southern Illinois University 
Jan. 6 with a program of three sonatas. 

To begin at 4 p.m. in Shryock Auditorium, the public recital will include 
Bach's "Sonata No. 2 in D Major"; Brahms 1 "Sonata No. 1 in E minor" and the 
"Sonata No. 2 in F minor" by Bohuslav Martinu. 

Spurbeck, formerly of Northern Illinois University, joined the music 
department faculty this fall, Mueller is department chairman. 



-pb- 



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FOR REFERENCE 

Not to be taken from this room